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Discussion Starter #1
On 07/11/2018 we had a lightning strike very close to our house and did significant damage to several electronics equipment components including our 6 yr old Voltec L1 EVSE. Also damaged were cable modem, wifi router, network switch, 2 desktop computers, satellite receiver, entertainment sound system, and spa digital controller. Power was out for maybe 1.5 hours then it came back on without any visits from the power company. Neighbor also got hit. Lots of hassle recovering, but we will live through it.

Everything, but the EVSE, is covered by my homeowner's insurance policy. The insurance company says the EVSE is considered an "accessory" to the car and would be covered by the auto policy. Lots of back and forth discussion with the adjuster but he wasn't changing the "definition". I felt that if it had been hardwired to the house and bolted to the wall it would have been covered, but being able to unplug it and take it with me made it an "accessory" in their world. The down side is the deductible on the auto policy is higher than the replacement cost of the EVSE, so it will be my dime.

I feel that if I were to sell the Volt it should have a portable L1 EVSE included. I have lived comfortably for the last 7.5 years with only 12amp L1 charging and don't feel the need to move on to L2 at this time (retired, short trips, etc). So my question to the group is what EVSE should I purchase from the following options (other suggestions accepted).

1) Local Chevy dealer - P/N 24276685 = $486+tax = $525
2) Shopchevyparts dot com - P/N 24276685 = $370 (tax & shipping ??)
3) GMpartsdirect dot com - P/N 24276685 = $370 (tax & shipping ??)

All are OEM replacements for my dead P/N 22914085 and I assume they all have the capability to select 8amp or 12amp on the EVSE like the original 2011-12 EVSE. At least the photo on the websites looks right. Anyone with experience?

4) Clipper Creek L1 - P/N PCS-15 = $395 (no tax or shipping)

However, Clipper Creek is only 12amp EVSE not switchable - at least with my 2011 Volt. Should I care about not having the ability to switch to 8amps for a future owner?

I'm putting the Volt in Mountain Mode each time I start it to keep the battery near mid charge as a precaution so that it will maintain the battery temp at least when it is being driven. We have been seeing 110F for the past few days with not much lower for the near future.

Thoughts?

Oh yeah, I guess this answers the question of should you unplug during a lightning storm.

VIN # B0985
 

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thanks for the insurance info.
So if it was a Level 2 then the house coverage would do?

What about any extended car coverage you may have ?

All 3 ( house /car/extended car coverage ) are same USAA so not sure how they were handle that.

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At lease with some new Level 1 charger cords you can get one with a Level 2 option for later use.
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What's the problem? Just get from one which brings it quickest so you can enjoy silent ride.

My lawn movers 100hrs maintenance costed more than that..
 

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Yes, hardwired EVSE seem to be treated differently. Plugin models are considered an appliance. Still, what's a computer power brick then?

I usually unplug the car during lightning.
 

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However, Clipper Creek is only 12amp EVSE not switchable - at least with my 2011 Volt. Should I care about not having the ability to switch to 8amps for a future owner?
Your OEM EVSE was also 12 amp. The car decides whether to call for 8 or 12 amps.

The EVSE that comes with the Gen 2 Volt is convertible to use as a 240V cord. Get one those and you'll be covered for 8/12 amps at 120V or 12 amps at 240V for much faster charging.
 

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The original 2011/2012 EVSEs were switchable 8/12, and the car obeyed the charger. Different from 2013+.

After I converted my OE 2014 EVSE to 120/240 operation, I also felt the car should have it's own OE EVSE, should I sell it or trade it in. You may be able to find one here, or FB, eBay etc. I ended up buying a used 2013 model (same as 2014), from a user on this forum, for about $225 + shipping IIRC.

If you can't wait, I wouldn't sweat the 8A/12A thing too much, if you want to buy a different unit. My wife's C-Max only had fixed L1 12A charging. With disclosure, to the buyer of course, that it isn't the original make. The original 2011 EVSE had a lot of problems based on what you'll read here.
 

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Why not pick up a Duosida? They can be had cheap, and do level 1 and 2 charging. Pretty light, waterproof, and in fact the only downside is it doesn't stow in the OEM spot. I just coil mine up and put it on the floor behind the driver's seat for easy retrieval.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Your OEM EVSE was also 12 amp. The car decides whether to call for 8 or 12 amps.

The EVSE that comes with the Gen 2 Volt is convertible to use as a 240V cord. Get one those and you'll be covered for 8/12 amps at 120V or 12 amps at 240V for much faster charging.
I was hoping to avoid this but the 2011-12 Volts are different than later Volts. The 8/12 amp level is selected on the EVSE NOT in the car. For L1 the 2011-12 Volts will take what ever the OEM EVSE says is available (8/12 amps).

What ever I purchase will go with the car when I sell/trade it. I'm fine with L1 12 amp, bumping to 240v would cost me the install of the higher voltage system which I don't feel a need for.

VIN # B0985
 

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Your OEM EVSE was also 12 amp. The car decides whether to call for 8 or 12 amps.
Not on a 2012 (or 2011). The EVSE signals on those, and the car uses that signalling to determine what draw to use. Only the 2013 and later allow the draw to be selected in/on the car.
 

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That's why I installed a (20A) rocker switch on the charge outlet to isolate the EVSE except for those times it is actually in use or in danger of bad power. We don't get lighting here (hardly ever) but we get winter wind storms that can bring down trees (lots of those) on power lines with the same result. It also isolates the EVSE from bad power (spikes, surges, brown outs) when it's not being used.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
That's why I installed a (20A) rocker switch on the charge outlet to isolate the EVSE except for those times it is actually in use or in danger of bad power. We don't get lighting here (hardly ever) but we get winter wind storms that can bring down trees (lots of those) on power lines with the same result. It also isolates the EVSE from bad power (spikes, surges, brown outs) when it's not being used.
I've wondered about adding a switch in line. Do you think that a high voltage lightning strike could/would jump the contacts inside the switch? How about the circuit breaker in the service panel? Most of the electronics were plugged into surge suppression power strips which probably weren't robust enough to make a difference.

VIN # B0985
 

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Lightning screws stuff up by flooding the "ground". It's like trying to throw a 5 gallon bucket into a thimble. The voltage ripples back and forth rapidly as it doesn't know which way to flow. It goes everywhere. Breakers won't isolate you from a direct hit, the ground is always connected and the transient and induced voltage will still fry your stuff.

The only only real way to avoid lightning is to have very very good deep ground spikes and not to get struck in the first place. On the flip side if you have a really good ground tied to a large deep well or something you can end up making yourself a terrific lightning rod.

There is no device or protection at all from a direct hit. You have to be completely isolated, within an adequate faraday cage.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Lightning screws stuff up by flooding the "ground". It's like trying to throw a 5 gallon bucket into a thimble. The voltage ripples back and forth rapidly as it doesn't know which way to flow. It goes everywhere. Breakers won't isolate you from a direct hit, the ground is always connected and the transient and induced voltage will still fry your stuff.

The only only real way to avoid lightning is to have very very good deep ground spikes and not to get struck in the first place. On the flip side if you have a really good ground tied to a large deep well or something you can end up making yourself a terrific lightning rod.

There is no device or protection at all from a direct hit. You have to be completely isolated, within an adequate faraday cage.
To be honest, this has been my thoughts all along. The only way to completely avoid lightning damage is to unplug all equipment from the wall outlet - if possible. How likely are people to do that? My guess is not many people will run around unplugging every bit of electronic equipment which seems to be in nearly every electrically powered device now. Even our new cloths dryer is wi-fi enabled.

On the upside my insurance paid for everything that was damaged except for the EVSE. So in the future it will get unplugged for sure.

BTW, I went with the Clipper Creek L1 EVSE. I guess their reputation won me over.

VIN # B0985
 

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A large part is how well your house is grounded. The one (big) experience I've had with power surge wasn't from lightning but from a tree falling on power lines. It knocked out the washer , dryer and fridge and the surge suppressor was a blackened mess with soot blown out the plug in slots. Fried to a crisp. Surprisingly the printer, computer and screen plugged into it were all OK and checked out fine. I don't know who was more surprised, me or the home owner.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
A large part is how well your house is grounded. The one (big) experience I've had with power surge wasn't from lightning but from a tree falling on power lines. It knocked out the washer , dryer and fridge and the surge suppressor was a blackened mess with soot blown out the plug in slots. Fried to a crisp. Surprisingly the printer, computer and screen plugged into it were all OK and checked out fine. I don't know who was more surprised, me or the home owner.
In my part of the world the overhead power lines are higher than any trees that grow in the desert. In the rural areas like ours, the power company goes around and whacks down anything that looks like it could gets close to the lines. In most new housing developments the power, telephone, and cable lines are all underground.

VIN # B0985
 
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