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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saudi funded Reuters has published another propaganda/attack piece aimed at electric vehicle battery technology. You can read "Lithium-ion batteries too dangerous?" here: http://www.iol.co.za/motoring/industry-news/lithium-ion-batteries-too-dangerous-1.1498104

The author, Deepa Seetharaman is based in Detroit and covers the auto industry. "Previously, she was based in New York where she covered the airlines and hotels, as well as the stock market."

Previously, Ms. Seetharaman was critical of the auto bailout:

Evidently, Ms. Seetharaman's expertise extends well beyond Wall Street and the auto industry even into dance:

You can email her with your reaction to her hit piece at: deepa.see[email protected]
 

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I don't believe any email from our members will convince her to change her views, be them from a professional reporter or imposed by her employer.

It could be a futile attempt, such as shouting in a well. You will make a loud noise but no one will hear you. The satisfaction of having the best American vehicle is proof that these negative views of the bailout and battery investment are meaningless.
 

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Saudi funded Reuters has published another propaganda/attack piece aimed at electric vehicle battery technology. You can read "Lithium-ion batteries too dangerous?" here: http://www.iol.co.za/motoring/industry-news/lithium-ion-batteries-too-dangerous-1.1498104

Geez, I was just falling in love with my new Black & Decker Cordless drill with its tiny Lithium-ion battery pack - that seems to last FOREVER on a charge.

Oh, and I'd better hand over my R/C helicopter batteries [that I've been using for 3 years now] before they burst into flames. :)
 

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Come on, give her a break, she looks tired (or drugged). Imagine if she had to list all the dangers and issues of gasoline. Instead of one page, she would have had to write something the size of an encyclopedia. Besides, it's always easier to scare old folk and the feeble minded with a new tech horror story than it is with something they all use everyday. Keep in mind, DC electricity used to get the same yellow-journalism treatment.

"When George Westinghouse suggested using high-voltage AC instead, as it could carry electricity hundreds of miles with marginal loss of power, Edison waged a "War of Currents" to prevent AC from being adopted.

The war against AC led him to become involved in the development and promotion of the electric chair (using AC) as an attempt to portray AC to have greater lethal potential than DC. Edison went on to carry out a brief but intense campaign to ban the use of AC or to limit the allowable voltage for safety purposes. As part of this campaign, Edison's employees publicly electrocuted stray or unwanted animals to demonstrate the dangers of AC; alternating electric currents are slightly more dangerous in that frequencies near 60 Hz have a markedly greater potential for inducing fatal "cardiac fibrillation" than do direct currents. On one of the more notable occasions, in 1903, Edison's workers electrocuted Topsy the elephant at Luna Park, near Coney Island, after she had killed several men and her owners wanted her put to death.His company filmed the electrocution."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Edison#War_of_currents
 

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The war against AC led him to become involved in the development and promotion of the electric chair (using AC) as an attempt to portray AC to have greater lethal potential than DC. Edison went on to carry out a brief but intense campaign to ban the use of AC or to limit the allowable voltage for safety purposes. As part of this campaign, Edison's employees publicly electrocuted stray or unwanted animals to demonstrate the dangers of AC; alternating electric currents are slightly more dangerous in that frequencies near 60 Hz have a markedly greater potential for inducing fatal "cardiac fibrillation" than do direct currents. On one of the more notable occasions, in 1903, Edison's workers electrocuted Topsy the elephant at Luna Park, near Coney Island, after she had killed several men and her owners wanted her put to death.His company filmed the electrocution."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Edison#War_of_currents
This is just another incident of converting a great invention of mankind into a terrible way to kill. But we know better now. and I personally know that DC kills more easier than AC. I have suffered hundreds of electric shocks while working with high voltage in home circuits, old telegraphic circuits and vacuum-tube equipment for over fifty-five years (my first shocks were with the common household AC outlets as a curious child), yet I don't fear working with electricity at all. The high DC voltage generated on a spark plug can kill you, and I felt that, too! GM also knows that DC can kill, and they have done superb engineering work on the Volt to prevent any accidental shocks to the technicians that work with them, or to the casual Volt owner who is just trying to keep the engine bay clean..
 

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I emailed her. Here is my email and her response-
Deepa,
I recently read your article on lithium ion batteries and think that you are spreading mis-information with no real world proof to back up your conclusions.

"GM overcame an early problem when a Volt caught fire during tests run by the US National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, for instance, and after all, car and plane engineers successfully tamed gasoline and jet fuel."

The battery did not catch fire during the test the car was crashed then stored vertically without draining the fluids. After 2 weeks of storage the car was smoldering due to fluids on the battery. I hope that if I am in an accident I can get out of the vehicle with in 2 weeks prior to it catching on fire.

You as well as others in the media are spreading fear propaganda and scaring people away from new technology that this country desperately needs. Please in the future investigate all of the facts when you write an article.

RESPONSE-

Hey Scott,

Thanks for your note and you're right that the crash happened weeks later. We worded it that way because the Volt was being tested by NHTSA over a period of several months. So we were saying the fire happened during that testing period.
I can see how that can be interpreted differently. We'll have to be more precise in the future.

Not trying to spread lies. I think the story hits on the complexity of lithium ion batteries and how it can be tough and costly it is to rein it in for widespread adoption. There isn't an OEM that wouldn't tell you it's a costly, complex engineering puzzle.

Thanks for your note.
 

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Jesus f'ing christ. Are we really dredging up personal photos of journalists now and encouraging people to hassle them directly to their work email accounts because they write about the fact that EV lithium battery packs are complex and expensive and special care has to be taken to engineer them to be safe? REALLY?



Of course this is a legitimate topic to cover. Please learn to accept the fact that not every single mention of EV's, lithium batteries, Volt's, etc. anywhere on the entire Internet is going to be worded exactly to your liking.

If it matters, the original article has a different title: "Rethinking the lithium-ion battery revolution over cost, safety" http://in.reuters.com/article/2013/...feedName=everything&virtualBrandChannel=11709 instead of "Lithium-ion batteries too dangerous?". Idk how the OP found that re-post with the different title on an obscure South African news website.

My advice: chill the f out. Stop surfing the web looking for any and every slight against the Volt, EV's, lithium batteries, etc. and posting it to this site. If you want to post comments to those articles, fine, have at it. But for f sake, have some perspective. Haven't we had enough thousands of these mostly-pointless posts the last few years? "OH MY GOD! Someone somewhere on the internet said something bad about something that I think is good! EEK GAD!"

But then to make it overly personal towards the journalist? C'mon. Grow up.
 

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Now THAT is a post with VITALITY! Apologies, jsmay, I realize that your post was meant to be more scolding than funny, but I'm still chuckling at my desk as your words (especially your intro) continue to play in my mind. I must say this is one of the greatest forums on the internet. Keep it coming folks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Come on, give her a break, she looks tired (or drugged)
laughs, yes she does.

@jsmay311: Reuters is being scrutinized due to their long standing participation in a smear campaign against the Volt. It was during an election that Reuters reported that each Chevy Volt cost GM $89,000 to manufacture, and that GM was losing $49,000 per Volt sold. Given Reuters conflict of interest funding from Saudi Arabian oil, combined with their deliberately inaccurate reporting on the Volt, they ought to recuse themselves from any further coverage of electric vehicles and battery technology (i.e. any coverage from Reuters is now inappropriate regardless of content). These people are public figures, and they are responsible for what they print; so don't expect me to cry a river for them.

They come down to the ball park gloating that they are going to strike us out, so don't feign surprise when we swing the bats. Man up or man down, jsmay311.

Note that the article is being re-vomited by the usual right wing whack jobs:
http://nlpc.org/stories/2013/04/11/chevy-volt%E2%80%99s-battery-technology-questioned-after-billions-wasted

Chevy Volt Battery Technology Questioned After Billions Wasted

It appears that the Mainstream Media folks may finally be starting to expose one of the worst cases of taxpayer abuse that this country has ever seen. Kudos to Deepa Seetharaman who wrote a piece for Reuters which questions the feasibility of the government-subsidized, lithium-ion based battery technology behind electric vehicles (EVs) like the Chevy Volt. While Seetharaman acknowledges the limitations of lithium-ion batteries, what remains unchallenged is the continued waste of billions of taxpayer dollars to support the failing, pseudo-green technology.

The evidence that the Obama Administration's EV subsidization has been a costly fiasco (particularly regarding the Chevy Volt hoax) continues to mount. While I'm certain that green extremists and General Motors' supporters will claim that the criticism is limited to right-wing parties with ties to the evil oil industry, a simple review of the facts reveals that some very credible and unbiased sources are admitting that, despite the billions of taxpayer dollars spent, plug-in EVs are not the solution for America's environmental and energy needs.
 

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Jesus f'ing christ
This guy shows a lot of disrespect to people of faith. And throwing the F-bomb around like a three year old playing with his father's revolver does not impress me. This individual is the one who needs to grow up. Really.
 
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The Internet Never Fact Checks Itself And Never Forgets!

Thank you James and a giant Cyber Nod to you.
Our friend James is heavy into computers, business networks and IT Security. He understands completly the title of my comment here and in a moment you will as well.

The bird cage is gone! Back in the day the newspaper would rin an editorial, opinion or article. It would be read be subscriber's then discarded as another paper would show up the next day. Often as the joke went, it would end up in a bird cage.

If a responsible publisher discovered a factual error there was a section in the paper for the retraction or correction.
With the internet there is no birdcage. Search engine's find it all, good bad, fake, fraudulent, you name it, forever!

I have no way on my portible device, laptop, desk top to know if what I am reading is accurate, an orchestrated hit peice or just another uninformed opinion.
The new knowledge statement is simply this- "The Internet Says..."

...which bringsbme to our OP. The opinion writer that James has highlighted IS throwing unsupported ideas around as fact. Yesterday on the AutoNews.com web site her colume on the li-ion battery state of affairs played as fact to an otherwise tech savy Dealer reader base.
Leading with rumor, misleading facts, dated information she described the very robust sustainable transportation industry as a floundering flop and futther in such a bad light that I will not link it here.
No mention of the fast approaching quarter million EV World Wide Sales since the limited beta deployments of late 2010, an achievement just short of stunning!

Always remember- "But the internet says!" The bird cage is gone and there is no more retraction pages.

Keep up the great work James!

My opinions are my own!

Best-

Thomas J. Thias

517-622-6081

@AmazingChevVolt
 
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