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Discussion Starter #1
Got to drive my friends Model 3- Wow!. Very fast and very tight car. The fit and finish are good. Interior materials are ok not super premium. This car is the future. I was very impressed with the handling and solid feel of the car.
 

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I had a Bolt for a week, impressed, but not a fan of the weak CCS infrastructure. I want to test out a Model 3, but I'll probably wait a year or two and get one used.
 

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I had a Bolt for a week, impressed, but not a fan of the weak CCS infrastructure. I want to test out a Model 3, but I'll probably wait a year or two and get one used.
I wonder how long it's going to be before the CCS infrastructure is usable. When I look at Plugshare the CCS chargers are never in good locations, they tend to be at car dealerships and malls not on highways. Electrify America isn't helping, CARB states only. Tesla sites their superchargers based on drivers needs not on the needs of mall owners.
 

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Yes I have- it's quick, but it does not come off as a quality car- interior is very cheap and the styling is boring- the model Y will bury it if it comes in at under $50,000. The Bolt is unfortunately like the Gen 2 Volt- it's not interesting enough for someone to plunk down $40,000.
 

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It would help a lot if there were charging station signs on the roadways, like the P signs for parking.
It would help even more if there were actually any CCS charging stations along roadways. I agree that signage will be extremely important to future of EVs, people won't buy them unless they believe that they will be able to charge them and the best way for that to happen is for the charging stations to be clearly marked.
 

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Just an opinion, much like you'd see on Tesla Forum:

A Volt will hold more stuff, has far better instrumentation (LED HUD Collision Warning, Blindspot Mirrors, instrument cluster), nicer interior, has Carplay and AA, OnStar if you love OnStar, and never any range anxiety. In California, there is $11,000 (7500 Fed + 1500 CA + 1000 SCE + 1000 GM Region) off the price plus whatever other discounts. The M3 is $7250.

The Volt remains (and retires) as the most pragmatic choice for those who enjoy driving in pure EV mode yet don't want the hassle with remote charging. Even the Tesla is still a hassle with remote charging. Some folk enjoy waiting 40 minutes for gas, or having the location of gas stations plan my trip for me, but I'm not one of them. Now that you can add 25 miles of range per hour in the Volt, it's even a better choice than before, but it is never limited by the availability of infrastructure.

It was not a difficult choice between a 2019 Volt and 2019 Model 3. Nor between the I-Pace and the Model S/X (M3 lacks cargo space).

Tesla makes some great cars that happen to be electric, but like all cars, one size doesn't fit all. If long range driving is what you are looking for, the Volt will hammer conventional EVs. Cruise at 85+ mph all season with the heater on, anywhere, anytime. Commute daily on just electricity? The Volt has the EV range for the lion's share of commuters.

IMO, the Model 3 is inherently a 'second car' just like my Jaguar and all BEVs. It's still priced at entry level luxury, yet doesn't have it.

But ... it's actually easier to get a 2019 Model 3 than a 2019 Volt Premier, so there's that.
 

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Haha, the Tesla forum, (at the Tesla website) is not really tolerant of any slightly negative opinions. Very hostile over there.

As a counterpoint, I would just say that I often have to transport my mom, 89yrs old in a wheelchair, and I had a hard time putting the wheelchair in my 2016 Volt, with the rear seat up, and the high rear sill. I would always put it down. In the Model 3, it's surprisingly deep, with a low sill so that I have no problem putting in the same wheelchair. Would be better if it were a hatchback like the Volt, but even with a trunk, I did not find the storage space to be as bad as others.

As for long-distance travel, I suppose you could wait 40minutes at a Supercharger for a fillup, but why, we know it's not like an ICE? If you do any travel planning, almost all the trips I have mapped out or driven, require only 10 to 20 minute stops, because you only plan to fill enough to get to the next stop, plus some buffer. I use 15% SOC as my buffer. I've mapped out trips from Maine to Boston, Maine to Philly, Maine to Ithaca, Maine to Baltimore, and Maine to NC, all regular trips that I either have already done, or plan to do. I've also mapped out a regular trip that I take out West, LA to Mammoth. I use Winter temp settings, with reduced range efficiency to match real conditions. All of those trips, only need 10 to 20 min stops, every 100 to 200 miles. The LA to Mammoth route, we always stop once or twice in the Audi to fillup and eat dinner. In the Tesla Model 3 LR AWD, the route planner estimates one stop in Lone Pine for 15 minutes. That's less time than we normally stop in the Audi. The reverse trip takes even less time for charging since it's downhill the first part into Bishop. If you're stopping for 40minutes, then you either have the bladder of an elephant, or the constitution of Job, or are just doing it wrong. With a family, you stop even more. Sure, it's only a 300 mile trip, but the further the trip, the less often you do it, right? That's a fairly common one since my brother has a ski house in Mammoth.
 
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