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I bought my 2011 volt in March 2011. I have always been able to get 34-40 miles on a charge. Now I am only getting 26 miles on a charge I brought it in to the dealer and they charged me $ 200 diagnostic fee and said there is no a problem and handed me a stack of how to drive the Volt. I have been driving it for 7 years so I think I know how to drive it. There has to be a reason it has dropped miles. It is hot here in southern Arizona so it is not the cold and I am not using the AC.
 

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What has changed? New tires?
 

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You know your car better than anyone. Obviously something is wrong, but now it's time for the real detective work since the dealership is useless.

Lot's of culprits here that you'll need to explore. Run through the usual suspects of sticky brake rotor (use a temp sensor on all of them after a ride). Check tires, tire pressure, etc. Since the 2011 doesn't offer the kWh used guesstimate, which can at least theoretically flag a real issue, you might need an OBD scanner to check your SOC and kWh used. A meter for your charger could help too. Do a full discharge and check if you notice that the meter shows that the car is accepting less kWh than it should before considering itself "full."

Start there and narrow it down. Too bad the dealership doesn't know to do these rather basic things for its Volt customers who often go in complaining about these exact issues.
 

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VoltenRock brings up a good question: are you regularly fully discharging and fully recharging the battery or are you doing mostly many small "top-offs" of the battery instead?
 

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All batteries will degrade over time and the Volt's won't be an exception. So you should expect some degradation. However, going from 40 miles to 26 is a huge drop. Take it to the dealer.

FYI the reason for the questions about whether you exhaust the battery before charging is that we've had reports about the battery management system getting confused on where the bottom of the charge is. If you're driving until the battery goes flat and then recharging this won't happen.
 

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If you change routes from 45 mph surface streets to 78 mph freeways then the range on the guessometer could indeed drop from 38 to 26. Got a new job which taking the freeway is the best commute?
 

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If you change routes from 45 mph surface streets to 78 mph freeways then the range on the guessometer could indeed drop from 38 to 26. Got a new job which taking the freeway is the best commute?
Or did you do like me? I used to hypermile like a grandpa, eeking out every Ev mile I could, then I changed to new 18” wheels, better performing tires and drive it like a jackrabbit.

Or are you hauling an Olympic weight set in the hatch, or your overweight father in law in the passenger seat?

I’m voting for Voltenrock’s stuck caliper theory.
 

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>>> Miles on a charge dropping

Problem is, charge is measured in kWh. Miles may always vary, for a variety of reasons.

Because you have a 2011, the vehicle does not report kWh used after each trip. so, you will need to get an OBDII meter and measure the SOC and kWH used on multiple trips. Make sure some of these trips fully drain the battery.

After doing this for some time, if you notice you are getting ~9.5 kWh out of the battery after each full discharge, your battery is fine. You have to look at other stuff like tires (my AER went down significantly after I replaced my OEMs tires with better tires ... was expecting it). Bad brakes, change in terrain, change in speed, change in temperature, and a variety of other factors outside of the battery could also cause the AER to go down. You have been using your Volt for a while, so I am sure you know a lot more than your dealer does.

Even if you get 8.5kWh, you lost less than 10% of battery capacity. If you are getting significantly less (like 6.5kWh), you may have a case.
 

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Even though you aren't using AC, doesn't mean the battery pack isn't using it to cool.

Years of living in a hot climate is hard on EV batteries. It's very possible you have lost some capacity.
 

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All of the replies posted have good thoughts, the heat where you live will cause the most loss of battery range, but your dealer must be claiming that the capacity of your battery has not dropped below 80%, or the Voltec warranty would apply (assuming that you do not have more than 100K miles).

I have a 2011 Volt, SN 1586, with 88K miles. I live in Michigan and in the winter the range can drop below 25 miles. However recently I have gotten as much as 42 miles, no AC and outside temp around 70 degrees. With AC and outside temp about 90 degrees, 36 miles of moderate driving. At highway speeds that would drop to about 30 miles. I keep 38 to 40 PSI in my original equipment type tires.

If the suggestions listed in this thread don't help, you might want to get a second opinion from a better dealer. The heat where you live may have caused the battery to degrade to the point where the warranty should replace it. Note the warranty battery may not be as good as new (read the fine print), but it should get you back up to 28 to 32 miles. (assuming your driving and tires are similar to when you were getting the better range.
 

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I note the OP has not replied to anyone. Hit and run "I have a problem." Where's the love?
 
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