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Here's my situation: I bought a car involved in an accident. Nothing major, 1 suspension and bumper. However, the fire rescue team followed the emergency procedure even if there was no risk at all...

In case of emergency, the first responder guide suggest to cut the main harness in the left rear compartment where the yellow tape is. Normally you do this when a car is on fire.

They totalled the vehicle as the insurer wrote on the damage estimate that a new battery was required because this wire was cutted. 10K$ for that. Hopefully it's not the case...

I think I may now need to replace the main harness which will still be quite of a job.

Anybody have more information of this wire section?
 

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I don't know anything about that harness but sometimes cutting wires results in more than just the harness needing to be replaced: fuses, connectors, etc. Although I guess if it was "designed" to be cut, maybe not.

Mike
 

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Here's my situation: I bought a car involved in an accident. Nothing major, 1 suspension and bumper. However, the fire rescue team followed the emergency procedure even if there was no risk at all...

In case of emergency, the first responder guide suggest to cut the main harness in the left rear compartment where the yellow tape is. Normally you do this when a car is on fire.

They totalled the vehicle as the insurer wrote on the damage estimate that a new battery was required because this wire was cutted. 10K$ for that. Hopefully it's not the case...

I think I may now need to replace the main harness which will still be quite of a job.

Anybody have more information of this wire section?
Perhaps 'Rear of Vehicle Harness Routing' or a similar area on this page helps:
https://www.autocats.ws/manual/chevrolet/tis0911/en/documents_2012/Volt/SM-R/92565233.en.html

Google search: https://www.google.com/search?q=site:autocats.ws+volt+harness
 

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What year and model of car?

I would think that brighter minds would have designed this wire as a replaceable link...
 

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If you cut the harness there, it blows ALL the fusible links inside the battery. You have to drop the battery and replace each of them. It also may have blown the 350 amp "main fuse" in the center console/ top of the battery.

You can watch the deep dive video, its in there somewhere. they totally disassemble the whole pack.

https://insideevs.com/chevrolet-volt-battery-deep-dive-2-hour-video/

Fuses are at 1hr 38 mins

for up close look

https://youtu.be/eWYtq0hxhQg?t=5918 and https://youtu.be/eWYtq0hxhQg?t=6623
 

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A friend of mine had to replace the wiring harness in his car after a squirrel ate through a bunch of wires in the engine compartment. It was $6,000 to replace as they had to basically disassemble the car and the harness itself took well over a month to get. Imagine replacing all the veins in your body... Cables can run everywhere. So interior, headliner, engine bay, etc. Now add to that any blown fuses, dropping the battery. Yes, it could be $10k. Or it could be your new hobby for the next 6-10 months depending on how handy you are.
 

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I don't understand all the doom and gloom.:confused:

I see the 'First Responders' .pdf. and these cut points simply isolate and turn off 12 Volt power to the High Voltage relays.
This keeps the 400 Volts in the big battery and nowhere else.
How could cutting low voltage wires 'Pop' fuses throughout the High Voltage battery?

These guys are not cutting into 400 VDC wires with their big cutters....

Just buy the correct size butt-splices and the required crimpers and repair the cut wires.
Of course have the 12V battery disconnected and that High Voltage cutoff connector removed while doing this work.
 

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I don't understand all the doom and gloom.:confused:

I see the 'First Responders' .pdf. and these cut points simply isolate and turn off 12 Volt power to the High Voltage relays.
This keeps the 400 Volts in the big battery and nowhere else.
How could cutting low voltage wires 'Pop' fuses throughout the High Voltage battery?

These guys are not cutting into 400 VDC wires with their big cutters....

Just buy the correct size butt-splices and the required crimpers and repair the cut wires.
Of course have the 12V battery disconnected and that High Voltage cutoff connector removed while doing this work.
best way is to solder the wires together and use heat shrink over the joint to protect wires
no corrosion problems down the road
 

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I thought there was a main fuse you could pull under the floor of the centre consul that you can pull to cut power to the main battery for those incidences. Wouldn't that be easier?
 

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I thought there was a main fuse you could pull under the floor of the centre consul that you can pull to cut power to the main battery for those incidences. Wouldn't that be easier?
If you can get in there, sure. Sometimes the doors are locked. Then you need to disable the HV pack from the OUTSIDE of the car.
 

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best way is to solder the wires together and use heat shrink over the joint to protect wires
no corrosion problems down the road
This is not the best way and it's never used in aviation.
Soldering makes for a brittle area in the wire which can crack and the flux that is left behind is corrosive.
Proper butt-splices are the way to go and you could add environmental heat shrink tubing on top if you like.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
That’s better and more logical too. I don’t know how many wires is this harness but quite a few for sure!!! Thanks guys!!! I should see the car tomorrow...
 

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This is not the best way and it's never used in aviation.
Soldering makes for a brittle area in the wire which can crack and the flux that is left behind is corrosive.
Proper butt-splices are the way to go and you could add environmental heat shrink tubing on top if you like.
It's not used in automotive either! GM has special structural splices for these types of repairs.


I thought there was a main fuse you could pull under the floor of the centre consul that you can pull to cut power to the main battery for those incidences. Wouldn't that be easier?
I recall some console parts need to be unbolted to get to it. Regardless, "the fuse" is under this cap. If cutting the link shorted out the battery, the fuse should be able to be changed by just popping it out of the cap.
 

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This is not the best way and it's never used in aviation.
Soldering makes for a brittle area in the wire which can crack and the flux that is left behind is corrosive.
Proper butt-splices are the way to go and you could add environmental heat shrink tubing on top if you like.
When both are done properly, one is just as good as the other. The brittle area in the wire from soldering (and flux) is mitigated by the proper length of heat shrink tubing. Butt connectors can sometimes "rot" from the inside out (where the connector touches the wire) because unlike with proper soldering which seals the marriage between wire and connection, moisture can get to the connection between the wire and the butt connector. Six in one hald, half a dozen in the other. I use both in certain situations but I have no knowledge of the harness in question here so wouldn't know which I'd use until I see it. I'm sure both would work.

Mike
 

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don't know much about airplane wiring
but the chances of the airplanes wires getting splashed with water usually means your flying it wrong
in humid conditions or just the non similar metals in the but splice can corrode the connection, I just solder
 

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If you can get the exact size needed with the proper crimp tool size...the crimp can be pretty good. But I’ve certainly seen a LOT of those crimps fail.
I they first had a tiny bit of conductive silver grease in the crimp- then all the other proper stuff...I would suspect it would be pretty darn corrosion proof. (Well- within reason).

I’ve never had a solder connection I’ve done fail. Certainly I’ve read the drawbacks, but mitigating the potential brittle/vibration issue with strapping the ends of the wire- it seems pretty darn good.
Some of the best I’ve done are ones that I crimp, then solder. I’m many say That is the worst of both worlds, but it has worked quite well for me.

I always shrink tube the connections, best if the type that have the glue inside that seals them really well. Of course, shrink tube needs to be proper sized also.

Now high voltage AC is different.

Just my experience.

Mark
 

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power connection I do with butt splices that are copper and have a flat screw to tighten the wires
then the gluey heat shrink overtop but that's in the ground 3 feet, so constant, more or less temperature and cooling of the wires, are there
my hot rod of forty years has had every butt splice that failed, witch was all of them ,replaced with solder , never had a solder connection fail, hard to tell me otherwise
flux I remove with my finger nail or I use acetone
 
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