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:eek: what happened to all the knowledge from the EV1 why does this Volt only get 40 miles on charge. Did the EV1 really get over 100 miles on a charge. I would love to buy a Volt and I will not at this low low low low mpc.
 

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berton893 said:

"...Did the EV1 really get over 100 miles on a charge. ..."

According to the U.S. Department of Energy testing.

ACCELERATION 0-50 mph
At 100% SOC: 6.3 sec
At 50% SOC: 6.5 sec
Max. Power: 104.0 kW
Performance Goal: 13.5 sec
MAXIMUM SPEED @ 50% SOC
At 1/4 Mile: 78.3 mph
At 1 Mile: 79.6 mph
Performance Goal: 70 mph in One Mile


CONSTANT SPEED RANGE @ 45 mph
Range: 220.7 miles
Energy Used: 28.15 kWh
Average Power: 5.81 kW
Efficiency: 127 Wh/mile
Specific Energy: 58.5 Wh/kg


CONSTANT SPEED RANGE @ 60 mph
Range: 160.6 miles
Energy Used: 27.04 kWh
Average Power: 10.28 kW
Efficiency: 168 Wh/mile
Specific Energy: 56.2 Wh/kg


DRIVING CYCLE RANGE
Range per SAE J1634: 140.3 miles
Energy Used: 25.14 kWh
Average Power: 5.28 kW
Efficiency: 179 Wh/mile
Specific Energy: 52.3 Wh/kg
Performance Goal: 60 miles

NiMH EV1 specifications
http://avt.inel.gov/pdf/fsev/eva/ev1_eva.pdf

Kris Trexler test drives the Gen 2 EV1 with NiMH batteries
http://www.ev1.pair.com/charge_across_america/charge_html/nimh_test2.html


 

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:eek: what happened to all the knowledge from the EV1 why does this Volt only get 40 miles on charge.
Here is your homework assignment: Look up the specifications and operating procedures for both the EV-1 and the Volt. Compare and contrast. Post a two paragraph explanation to your question above. Of coarse, please sight your references.:D
 

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Well, the range of the Volt could be boosted up to 100 miles, but are you willing to pay $60K for that?
With the frenetic pace of battery research going on right now, I'm willing to bet that price comes down considerably over the next 5 years. Just hang in and watch.
 

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:eek: what happened to all the knowledge from the EV1 why does this Volt only get 40 miles on charge. Did the EV1 really get over 100 miles on a charge. I would love to buy a Volt and I will not at this low low low low mpc.
The EV1's battery pack weight about 1200 pounds. In a hybrid, that weight will kill your gas mileage once the gasoline engine kicks in. It's like towing an extra car.
 

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Dude in theory the volt can get 80 miles per charge, because your only using 50% of its 16KWh battery. A full Charge and discharge is so bad for any battery. This should give the battery 80% capacity which means 32 miles of electric only driving at 160,000 miles.

Thats the thing about Lithium ion batteries they very slowly lose their power capacity. A Older lead battery rapidly begins to suck after only 400 cycles.
For the vast majority of the country 40 miles is great are you really that lazy you wont plug your car in at night? For me i would plug it in every 2-3 nights nights a week.
 

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Cost is the reason we don't see large battery packs. There's no conspiracy, lies, or forgetfulness here. It's just that large packs require large amounts of money. GM estimated the cost of the EV1 to be around $80,000. Add a getset, make it bigger with 4 doors and 4 seats, and you are looking at perhaps a $90,000 car.

Critics of the Volt sometimes forget the biggest benefit of EREV. 40-miles all-electric-range will cover most Americans daily driving. So GM focused on that. Then the genset is there just in case you run out of juice. In my opinion, it's a perfect combination.

Most EV drivers today still own a gas car (or borrow or rent them when they need to go beyond their cars max range). The Volt puts 2 cars into one.
 

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Cost is the reason we don't see large battery packs. There's no conspiracy, lies, or forgetfulness here. It's just that large packs require large amounts of money. GM estimated the cost of the EV1 to be around $80,000. Add a getset, make it bigger with 4 doors and 4 seats, and you are looking at perhaps a $90,000 car.

Critics of the Volt sometimes forget the biggest benefit of EREV. 40-miles all-electric-range will cover most Americans daily driving. So GM focused on that. Then the genset is there just in case you run out of juice. In my opinion, it's a perfect combination.

Most EV drivers today still own a gas car (or borrow or rent them when they need to go beyond their cars max range). The Volt puts 2 cars into one.
I've said it many times: the stated 80,000 dollar cost of the EV1 is not a very telling figure. You just can't compare such a limited run vehicle hand-assembled and made of specialty parts to an actual full production vehicle. Besides, the RAV4EV cost half that and it was also made in very few numbers. We're talking a much bigger, heavier, and less aerodynamic vehicle that gets similar range at almost half the cost. So it's pretty obvious that the stated cost of the EV1 is just a GM talking point and not in any way a good measure of the feasibility of a NiMH electric car.
 

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com'on vader
The RAV4 was basically an EV conversion of an existing product not a "ground-up" EV like the Volt was.
You keep wanting to compare apples to apples but you refuse to yourself!
WOT
 

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com'on vader
The RAV4 was basically an EV conversion of an existing product not a "ground-up" EV like the Volt was.
You keep wanting to compare apples to apples but you refuse to yourself!
WOT
Obviously the EV1 as we know it wasn't an economical car. I'm saying that the project was crushed before the technology had a chance to prove itself, and that GM uses (exaggerated) EV1 figures to make it look like electric cars were nothing but a pipedream back then.
The RAV4EV shows us what the technology in question could do when put into a mass-production body.
 
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