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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been looking at Trading in my 2014 with 70,000 miles in great one owner condition. Dealers only offering $9,000 trade in my Zip code. Based on this quote today I no longer fear a future bricked car due to a bad battery 2 years from now. The business case is crystal clear based on its scrape value of $3,500 :KEEP

This is truly great news to me because at 9k trade value now, say 7k trade in value in 2 years knowing I can recover $3,500 or so even if it bricks minimizes the financial risk to keep, and this was the first quote. These hold value even as junk!

Just answered a few questions to get scrap value
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I am of the opinion that your Volt's scrap value to "Peddle" is nearly directly based on my Volt's value to me.
If I like mine, and want to keep it on the road, I'm going to need replacements as items deteriorate. Your "scrap" car is as likely to be sold part by part as it is to be processed back into elements.
Were everyone of of us to scrap our gen1 Volts, that used part market value would drop, as would a future 'peddle' offer.

The first car to be scrapped has more value (less supply) than the very last car (no further demand).
PowerNationTV(dot)com, June 9, 2020: "Well, it didn’t take long. The first 2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8 has been spotted at a salvage auction. The car is listed on Copart which is valuing the Corvette at $107,699. That’s around twice the asking price of a new base model."
 

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I'm not sure what an HV battery "core" is actually worth to those who refurbish them, but I see 2kWh (24v) sections offered for a couple hundred dollars on the solar/energy forums all the time which suggests that a 16kWh can be parted out broken down for well over $1k. I paid $1600 (+shipping) for mine a few years ago and feel like I got that much value back from the (not yet nearly dead) subpacks I kept when I swapped in.

From the numbers I see here for unobtanium parts (I just shipped the HV relay from MY old battery pack to another member here because GM only swaps the entire $800 unit which is deeply back ordered) it seems like there is still a good demand for many parts as long as one is willing to do the pulling/shipping.

On the other hand, a local Volt owner had a salvaged 2013 that I tried getting some parts from and the parts I needed (2011) were not a perfect fit and he seemed to struggle to unload more than the battery and some other HV components from it. Maybe he wasn't willing to ship?

I still monitor the Gen1 Insight forum which was my last daily driver and there is still a brisk business in keeping them on the road by enthusiasts. They are (in most ways) easier to DIY mod/work on (IMO) than a Volt but are nominally 10 years older. Probably more were made originally by an order of magnitude?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I am of the opinion that your Volt's scrap value to "Peddle" is nearly directly based on my Volt's value to me.
If I like mine, and want to keep it on the road, I'm going to need replacements as items deteriorate. Your "scrap" car is as likely to be sold part by part as it is to be processed back into elements.
Were everyone of of us to scrap our gen1 Volts, that used part market value would drop, as would a future 'peddle' offer.

The first car to be scrapped has more value (less supply) than the very last car (no further demand).
PowerNationTV(dot)com, June 9, 2020: "Well, it didn’t take long. The first 2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8 has been spotted at a salvage auction. The car is listed on Copart which is valuing the Corvette at $107,699. That’s around twice the asking price of a new base model."
True. Based on yesterdays visits to dealers and my desire to no longer have strangers come to my home to test drive a car I want to sell, the maximum dealer offer for my nearly excellent condition 20114 with 70K miles Was a measly 9K.

This tells me to keep it a couple more years until the risk of battery failure is at the right hand side of the bathtub curve. So yes, scrap value could be less in two years but perhaps more. Best scenario is the car is fine and I can sell or trade it for 7K, worst case it bricks and I lose a few K for my decision to keep it.
 

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This tells me to keep it a couple more years until the risk of battery failure is at the right hand side of the bathtub curve.
The trick is knowing when that is. Right now, we don't know what those odds are for the unanalyzed fleet. We can only make a good guess only for individual vehicles based on recurrent measurements from cell group voltages at full discharge. Which basically leaves every owner responsible for their own.
 

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This tells me to keep it a couple more years until the risk of battery failure is at the right hand side of the bathtub curve. So yes, scrap value could be less in two years but perhaps more. Best scenario is the car is fine and I can sell or trade it for 7K, worst case it bricks and I lose a few K for my decision to keep it.
Definitely. Even worse case, how can you not justify $5500 for two more years of the Volt experience? Not to mention increased insurance, taxes, registration etc.

My 2014 has 81,000 almost completely trouble free miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The trick is knowing when that is. Right now, we don't know what those odds are for the unanalyzed fleet. We can only make a good guess only for individual vehicles based on recurrent measurements from cell group voltages at full discharge. Which basically leaves every owner responsible for their own.
Agree. So when I tested my 70K mile 2014 a couple weeks ago I started out with all Cells equally charged at
4.02 V.
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After driving it like a teenager with a rental for an hour it switched over to ICE with 35 miles and 9kWh used.

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So when as fully discharged as I could do the cells were all with one hundredth of a volt

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So I think the risk is very low at this point, but I’m going to start paying attention to this baby and protect what seems to still be a very healthy battery.
 

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I'm glad the scrap value is good on the Gen 1 volts. I hope the price of battery rebuilds starts to come back down so that people can continue to drive them a long time. I still have friends that drive Gen 1 versions. That said, 2 days ago, I traded my 2014 Gen 1 in for a Tesla. No, I'm not a Tesla fanboy, either. I had just really wanted an AWD EV, for our rough winters, and the price cut they just had was enough to push me over the edge. I traded a 76K Gen1 in basically perfect condition. They gave me $7800 which was a little less than the OP and a little less than I would have liked to get, but was enough to get me to do the trade. A friend of mine traded his earlier this year for a Model Y and his was a 2012 with maybe 130K on it and they only gave him 3K for his, so I was a little worried it wouldn't work out well for me. If they wouldn't have given me at least $7500, my plan was to just keep it, as I really liked the car and it's still the only EV that I can drive an unlimited distance without hitting a charging station. My commute to work, when I go, is 5+ hours, and now I'm going to have to find a convenient route with fast charging. The Volt made that a non-issue. I owned 2 Gen 1's and loved them both, as well as loving my original '17 Bolt EV. GM did a great job. IMHO, their biggest mistake was not getting something out on the road that was mid-sized and AWD, about 5 years ago. They got a bit behind the curve at this point. At any rate, glad the Gen 1's are still a real viable vehicle!
 
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