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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Cannot find a dealership who does the 5 yrs 3 systems coolant replacement... the dealership who sold me the VOLT in 2013, after a great resistance confessed "we do not have the device", "we have never done it","it is not neccesary". We need a list of dealers who perform this mandatory? Warranty procedure.
 

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Vac-n-fill is a name brand tool, any dealership that sells Volts should have this tool. Ours has never been used and is falling apart. Most techs have a tool that does the same thing but is much easier to use. Mine is a Snap-on RADKITPLUSA and works very well at removing air from the cooling systems and back filling. After using this tool, I do not have to perform the bleed procedure with the GDS2 scan tool. Just about any Chevy dealership can perform this procedure, there is no reason to disable the high voltage system so the tech does not need to be Volt cert. I would recommend having a Volt tech to do the coolant exchange but not needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was considering to replace the 3 coolants with a partial replacement of the 3 reservoirs, including the big battery ( 6.3 qts,) the electronic (3.2 qt), and the ICE, 7.7 qt, so if I removed 1or2 quarts of each reservoir, and replace it with fresh coolant ,after 3-4 exchanges probably I have replaced at least 50% of the old coolant...The question is would GM honor the 8 yrs warranty or not ? Thank you "mpmoore" for your expert opinion...perhaps I should drive to Phoenix to do the job. LOL. Kind regards.
 

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GM will not block your warranty for lack of coolant service, only if you ran the car without coolant and they could prove it. Best to keep the receipts for the coolant so you can prove you did replace it if somehow they need that information. I have only seen warranty declined for lack of oil changes and only one time in 22 years working at a dealership.
 
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I would think they would jump at the chance to void a warranty if coolant not changed (most would). The five year change is overkill for most Volts especially if they aren't in hot or cold climates, they are just playing it extra safe. I wouldn't chance it. However once the warranty is up (one replacement) I would buy that $200 tool as it would pay for itself the first time you used it (if you are going to keep the car).
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
The "dilution method" for coolant exchange(removing fluid from the reservoirs) . The ICE ENGINE, if you could change 2 qt of the 7.7 qt in two dilutions you will have 4new qt, 3.7 old> 50% replacement, and if you repeat a third time 6qt new, old 1.7 qt around 68% replacement. The BATTERY with 6.3 qt with 1 qt replacement (smaller reservoir then the ICE) you will need 6 exchanges and get 79% replacement. The small system of the ELECTRONICS coolant (3.2 qt total)with 1 qt exchange in 3 exchanges you are over 50% replacement....I will keep the receipts of the 12 qt / 3 gallons of new DEX-COOL that I will buy at the local GM Chevy dealer for more credebility. Probably I will run the car for a full month between exchanges, so the old and new coolant can mix well. Thank you for your advice. PS.- I have removed the coolant with a turkey baster, but the maximum amount I was able to withdraw was 1 quart in each of the 3 reservoirs...so for the ICE & battery will have to increase number of exchanges to 6 giving me almost 80% replacement...I will reduce the interval to 2wks between procedures or it will be an eternal project...LOL
 

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GM will not block your warranty for lack of coolant service, only if you ran the car without coolant and they could prove it. Best to keep the receipts for the coolant so you can prove you did replace it if somehow they need that information. I have only seen warranty declined for lack of oil changes and only one time in 22 years working at a dealership.
You would be surprised what GM and the Dealer is not covering under that voltec warranty. I am still going between both to cover the 840 bill they just gave me on changing the high voltage harness between the charge port and the module which on page 16 of my warranty book refers to both of the areas of high voltage wires covered yet GM supposedly is telling the dealer no or supposedly is. Next stop....BBB autoline and attorney general armed with their own printed warrante of 8yr 100k warranty it clearly is printed in black and white! It seems they can pick and choose is the point!
 

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If I correctly understand what you plan to attempt, your "dilution" math is off.

After the first removal, each removal will take out some old, some new.
Add two new quarts and your mixture is 75%/25% old to new.
Next removal is only 1.5 quarts old removed. And goes down from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes you are correct, with further dilutions you are removing more and more fresh coolant, however I feel safer then having the main battery full of air bubles and codes and MIL all over...I heard that even with the VAC&FILL device you cannot removed 100% the old coolant, the best you get is a 90% removal. In my first change I have notice the ENGINE coolant was pink, while the battery and electric was like new very Orange color,must be the thermal difference in the systems. Tomorrow will chech the Ph differences between 5 yrs old and the new coolant. I promise will NOT open the can of worms of the "Dex-killer" acid seal-destroyer.
 
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Mine is a Snap-on RADKITPLUSA and works very well at removing air from the cooling systems and back filling. After using this tool, I do not have to perform the bleed procedure with the GDS2 scan tool.
The YouTube video of this tool just attached to a reservoir that had regular pressure cap saying an adapter wasn't needed. The Volt cap is a screw on cap so you must have an adapter. Where did you get it? Snap On?
 

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You do not need a adapter for the snap-on tool. The end that goes in to the reservoir is rubber and you twist the top to expand the rubber so the tool will seal. You do need a good air compressor to run this tool, it requires a good amount of air flow/pressure.

As far as the high voltage wiring not being covered, you need to find out their definition of "high voltage wiring". They may define the high voltage wiring as the traction battery wiring at 300 volts and above and not the 120/240 volt charge circuit wiring. I tried to find a labor operation for this wiring harness and was not able to find one. The labor op will show if this is covered under voltec warranty or not.
 
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I usually grasp concepts real quick but am a little thick about this one. I've seen the Weber Auto YouTube of this working but can't quite figure it out. I know the compressed air creates a vacuum (not sure how it does this but I'll give you that) but how does that vacuum suck out the coolant while replacing it with fresh stuff without being connected to an inlet port and an outlet port? It's just hooked to the top of the reservoir. Are there any flow diagrams out there? Does any one else have a conceptual problem with this? I'm not doubting this works, I just like to know how things work.
 

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The tool does not drain the coolant out, it just pulls a vacuum on the cooling system. The tool uses a venture effect creating a low pressure (vacuum) area inside the cooling system. Then you open the coolant supply line that is connected to a coolant bottle or reservoir that holds the new coolant. The coolant is then pushed in by atmospheric pressure in to the low pressure area of the cooling system. You must drain the coolant before using the tool.
 

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Vac-n-fill is a name brand tool, any dealership that sells Volts should have this tool. Ours has never been used and is falling apart. Most techs have a tool that does the same thing but is much easier to use. Mine is a Snap-on RADKITPLUSA and works very well at removing air from the cooling systems and back filling. After using this tool, I do not have to perform the bleed procedure with the GDS2 scan tool. Just about any Chevy dealership can perform this procedure, there is no reason to disable the high voltage system so the tech does not need to be Volt cert. I would recommend having a Volt tech to do the coolant exchange but not needed.
I had mine done just this past Saturday at 6 years. When I made the booking I had the same info from the service manager. I don't know what they used but it was not Vac-n-fill as I was told they did not have or use one, and the Volt certified tech does not work Saturdays. BTW, it was done at the same time as the dreaded coolant sensor replacement, and for that I paid only a $100 deductible.

It's all good now and I'm happy.

P.S. Just wanted to thank mpmoore1979 for the expertise he brings to the forum. It's always on point and useful.
 

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.....After using this tool, I do not have to perform the bleed procedure with the GDS2 scan tool.
So using the "fill under vacuum" procedure you're able to get enough of the air out such that it's not necessary to run the pump? Is this true for all three systems?

I rigged my own vac-n-fill system to flush the coolant on a 2008 Prius. My guide is posted here: https://priuschat.com/threads/diy-airlift-for-easy-and-quick-coolant-change.174844/

This worked perfectly on the Prius and it's running fine 40K miles later. I'm confident I've got the skills to pull this off and if it's really not necessary to cycle the pumps then this should be reasonably easy.

Thanks.
 
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