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A handful of times this fall/winter I've gotten in my car in the morning or during the day with liquid water coating the inside of the front windshield to the point it actually starts running down the inside of the windshield. No windshield or body leak to be seen, and no wetness in floorboards or trunk - it's condensing moisture though (that's also on the other windows but only fog). So much water that the Max defog doesn't make a dent whatsoever and I have to wipe it off with a rag before being able to drive. Any solutions? I drive with outside air, not recirculation, and keep all windows very clean with rubbing alcohol.

I also have the bad, vinegar-like smell after using the air-conditioner in the summer, so I wonder if water stays in the air-conditioner evaporator compartment causing odors in summer and evaporation in fall/winter? and if so, has anyone gotten GM to correct either of these issues. Thanks!
 

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owned 3 volts but have never experienced anything like this. Actually, no maintenance issues or problems whatsoever except for the recalls.
 

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Your condenser drain could be plugged. I've heard of it happening to others. And it very might well be the source of your issue. Take it to the dealer they should be able to clean out the drain if that is the problem.
and if it has been plugged for a while, they should do a complimentary "foam clean" of the heater core to get rid of any mold or nasty stuff that would have grown in there.
 

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I've had similar issues with my Gen 1 on a few occasions. Documented the first one here: http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?24753-Defogging-fail I ended up taking it to the dealer to make sure the humidity sensor was working, and everything checked out normally.

My only/best guess is that the Volt seals off the cabin air very tightly from the outside when the vehicle is turned off, so if you have warm, humid air trapped inside, and then the outside temperature drops significantly while the car is parked, the humidity condenses on the windows. What I can't quite come up with a theory for is why the Volt would be any different from any other vehicle in this regard. My previous car was a '95 Civic with less-than-perfect seals around the doors, so I can't really compare to how other new-ish vehicle behave in these conditions.
 

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It would help to always use recirculate, that is the only way its going to be effectively to dehumidify the air. What your currently doing is pumping the cabin full of moist air and then bottling it up.
 

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It would help to always use recirculate, that is the only way its going to be effectively to dehumidify the air. What your currently doing is pumping the cabin full of moist air and then bottling it up.
If the HVAC drain is plugged, then recirculating will not remove any moisture from the cabin. If outside air brought into the cabin is colder than the cabin temperature then the relative humidity will fall as the air is warmed. By cracking a window while pulling in outside air it should be possible to expel some moisture even if the HVAC drain is plugged. But a plugged drain is the most likely cause and the best solution is to have it cleared.

KNS
 

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If it is a plugged drain, one fix is to find the hose under the car and blow compressed air up to unclog the hose. But if you are really full of water, that might send liquid up into your dash and all over the interior floor before the water can drain out. The other option is to climb around underneath the dash (you need to be a chinese acrobat to successfully perform that feat without wrenching your back) and take stuff apart, sucking out the liquid with a wet-dry vac through a makeshift straw (duct tape and a small hose works well). I'm sure there are other McGyver tricks that could be used.
 

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It would help to always use recirculate, that is the only way its going to be effectively to dehumidify the air. What your currently doing is pumping the cabin full of moist air and then bottling it up.
My experience is usually the opposite. Granted, the climates in Chicago and Portland are different. But if the air inside the cabin is already so humid that severe fogging/condensing is happening in the inside surfaces of the windows, it seems likely that the outside air is less humid and turning off recirculate would be beneficial.
 

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I've owned three Volt's since March 2012 and operating them in all weather conditions here in southern Illinois and have NEVER experienced anything close to what you are describing/experiencing.

My advice is to have your local Chevy dealer. Good luck.
 

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My experience is usually the opposite. Granted, the climates in Chicago and Portland are different. But if the air inside the cabin is already so humid that severe fogging/condensing is happening in the inside surfaces of the windows, it seems likely that the outside air is less humid and turning off recirculate would be beneficial.
Going by your forum location, I live about a half hour north of you, and I agree...recirc only causes my cabin humidity to go up. I get steamy windows in the winter unless I turn it off. Of course, with "Eco" mode and recirc off, I get unpleasant Chicago winter air blowing in my face, so I guess it's a tradeoff...
 

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I thought I would add to this thread rather than start a new one. We've had our 2017 almost a month now and every time you get in the car to start it after it has been sitting (overnight or just while in the grocery store), the inside of the windshield fogs up upon startup.

Turning on the defrost yields mixed results. In my other cars, the AC comes on with the defrost and will usually clear the fog in seconds. In the Volt, it takes quite a bit longer -- and sometimes never really clears up. We have tried playing around with all the settings and have not found a combination that seems to help with this problem.

Hoping to avoid a trip to the dealer...checking to see if there's any other recent experience like this from the group.
 

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I thought I would add to this thread rather than start a new one. We've had our 2017 almost a month now and every time you get in the car to start it after it has been sitting (overnight or just while in the grocery store), the inside of the windshield fogs up upon startup.

Turning on the defrost yields mixed results. In my other cars, the AC comes on with the defrost and will usually clear the fog in seconds. In the Volt, it takes quite a bit longer -- and sometimes never really clears up. We have tried playing around with all the settings and have not found a combination that seems to help with this problem.

Hoping to avoid a trip to the dealer...checking to see if there's any other recent experience like this from the group.
Just to be clear, (pun intended) the windshield icon with MAX under it is the defog control. The other one, in the center without the MAX is the air flow control. The one with MAX will turn on the AC, the one without will not.

 

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I had this happen to me. Well, we went to attend wedding in Hawaii and did a rain dance there at the wedding party, so it diverted the pineapple express to deliver the much needed water in California. We were gone for ten days. My 2017 Volt was parked outside, plugged in while we were gone.

I used the Volt the following morning when we came back and was surprised that the inside windshield is covered with thick moisture. I did not precondition the car before I used it like I usually do. It took a while for it to clear out using the MAX Defogger, so I have to wipe off the inside with a paper towel. I've always preconditioned my car except for this one time after I parked it for 10 days.

I don't see the problem anymore as I always precondition it as soon as my alarm clock goes off and I prepare to work.
 

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Just to be clear, (pun intended) the windshield icon with MAX under it is the defog control. The other one, in the center without the MAX is the air flow control. The one with MAX will turn on the AC, the one without will not.
Yup...understood. My experience is despite using the MAX setting, which is why it's bothersome.
 

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Just to be clear, (pun intended) the windshield icon with MAX under it is the defog control. The other one, in the center without the MAX is the air flow control. The one with MAX will turn on the AC, the one without will not.
Are you sure about that? I every time I hit the "Non-Max" defrost button, also with the controls set to "fan only" I feel the AC (heat in this weather) come on and the energy screen shows the Climate percentage going up.

Thanks,
Rick
 

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Are you sure about that? I every time I hit the "Non-Max" defrost button, also with the controls set to "fan only" I feel the AC (heat in this weather) come on and the energy screen shows the Climate percentage going up.

Thanks,
Rick
Yes. I have tested it while the car is stopped. There is no additional power consumed with the non-max windshield air. The Max-Defog immediately switches on heat and or AC.
 

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Yes. I have tested it while the car is stopped. There is no additional power consumed with the non-max windshield air. The Max-Defog immediately switches on heat and or AC.
Then I am wondering if there is something wrong with my defroster. I seem, though, to remember the manual saying something to the effect of depending on the humidity, defrost MAY use the air conditioning.

Thanks,
Rick
 

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Then I am wondering if there is something wrong with my defroster. I seem, though, to remember the manual saying something to the effect of depending on the humidity, defrost MAY use the air conditioning.

Thanks,
Rick
I believe that it is worded that way because it "may" ONLY use heat if the outside air is really cold.
 
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