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The beautiful ($120,000. British Pound) Lighting GT all-electric premiered July 22, 2008 at the British Motor Show. Features rapid (10 minute) recharge capability.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/07/22/lightning_fast_charge_supercar/



Well, if we are to believe what they claim the quick-charge BEV is almost here! I wonder what lithium-ion technology they are using and who will supply it but if it works then the hydrogen car just died. I'm not getting ahead of myself however. I want to see the car function and for sale.

They also stated the obvious that home chargers will also have the same battery technology. That way it is charged throughout the day and then a very fast battery-to-battery quick-charge is performed. The 80% full in 2 minutes would be more that enough to change the world. Thus, let's see what happens. I am quite confident that this technology (quick-charging batteries or capacitors) is the future but I'm not yet convinced it will come this early. I'm looking forward to hearing more details on production plans and 3rd party verification. Oh, and that car is unbelievably beautiful. Bye bye golf cart image. Hello sexy modern. Even James Bond will wet himself when he first drives it. ;)
 

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For sure if they've refined the quick recharge technology it could be a breakthrough, but as you say, let's see some real world reviews. Looks like the 10 minute "quick recharge" feature requires a very very large circuit panel!

For ($240,000.) U.S. they could nickname it "the Jolt" . . .whatever. . .
 

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At $240K, there will be fewer buyers than for Tesla and Fisker. As with hydrogen, there is going to be an infrastructure problem for rapid recharging, but at least they can still slow charge. At the moment, the Fisker Karma is the only vehicle capable of rapid refill given their gasoline ICE.

I like the looks of the car, except for the rear roof. The back end of the Fisker Karma is much better looking.

None the less, the more the merrier. I love that there is such an explosion of creativity / competition in the auto industry.
 

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Well, if we are to believe what they claim the quick-charge BEV is almost here! I wonder what lithium-ion technology they are using and who will supply it but if it works then the hydrogen car just died. I'm not getting ahead of myself however. I want to see the car function and for sale.
It's using Altairnano batteries. It drives too, if you can believe the pictures at this link. Link

I'm pretty sure we'll get more specific performance reports before too long. Although it's definitely an expensive car, it's pretty much cutting edge tech. Supposedly, there are already a bunch off rich Brits on a waiting list.

I just want to see it race the Tesla Roadster.
 

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They also stated the obvious that home chargers will also have the same battery technology. That way it is charged throughout the day and then a very fast battery-to-battery quick-charge is performed.

Where did you see this? I'm sure it can be done for $80K or so but I couldn't find anything suugesting this is an option. What is the need for this at home?

Could anyone find battery capacity or range figures?
 

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Motor wheels.... yesss.... we need more of these for GM and others to understands this is so much more efficient to use motor wheels..... more power in a smaller package...
 

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Where did you see this? I'm sure it can be done for $80K or so but I couldn't find anything suugesting this is an option. What is the need for this at home?

Could anyone find battery capacity or range figures?
150 to 180 miles from a 36 Kwh battery pack. If you need more range than that, the pack is expandable. See it in action.
 

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For sure if they've refined the quick recharge technology it could be a breakthrough. .
Eh... you are aware that A123 cells have been capable of 10 minute charges for a few years now? That breakthrough is old news. What limits the charging speed now is your hookup to the power grid (assuming you have an appropriate high power charger). What it boils down to is, how much are you willing to pay for speed?

Plus if you want to look way back for breakthroughs in fast charging, nicads have been able to do that for a long long time. My first experience with that was 30 years ago with a 15 minute fast charger for an electric model airplane.. and a few years later I made a digital peak detector and modded my charger for higher currents and got that down to 7 or 8 minutes... fast charging is not new. What could be new is bringing the costs of car sized packs, fast chargers, and high power grid hookups down to reasonable levels.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Eh... you are aware that A123 cells have been capable of 10 minute charges for a few years now? That breakthrough is old news. What limits the charging speed now is your hookup to the power grid (assuming you have an appropriate high power charger). What it boils down to is, how much are you willing to pay for speed?
You're right, high speed recharging is not new technology. It looks like the folks at "Lighting" are asking for nationwide improvements to their electrical grid to accommodate rapid recharge capability for future vehicles.

If the folks at Lightning, or anyone else, finds a way to mass produce battery packs and in-home rechargers at low cost that would be the breakthrough. It's a beautiful design but how long does it take to charge on 110-220v?
 

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Eh... you are aware that A123 cells have been capable of 10 minute charges for a few years now? That breakthrough is old news. What limits the charging speed now is your hookup to the power grid (assuming you have an appropriate high power charger). What it boils down to is, how much are you willing to pay for speed?



Not new technology?! This technology is so new that a practical car using these batteries does not yet exist. Sure they are coming but when exactly is anyone's guess. The cost compared to standard lead-acid is a complete joke.

The limits of charging speed are not an issue at all. Any quick-charge station will require a similar battery technology that charges all day and night using standard industrial line hook-ups. That way a direct battery-to-battery energy transfer can be achieved. That actually is the easy part. The hard part is getting a good and practical battery technology in high volume production. One where the specifications (including what the specifications are over the life of the battery) are well know and verified. No, quick-charge large format vehicle batteries are most definitely on the cutting edge of new technology. I myself am waiting for a practical battery. I love what I hear but my wallet and the engineer in me doesn't.
 
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