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I noticed that some level 2 - 240 volt chargers require 16amp, some 20amps and some even 40amps. What is the difference? Is it charging times?

LS.
 

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That is amp capable ratings. The volt can only charge at 3.3KW and so at 240v that is under 15A draw from the EVSE. The unit you are talking about is not a charger, but the device to supply the AC power to the on board charger in the Volt. Those cars like the 2013 Leaf can draw up to 6.6KW so that means a 30A rated EVSE is needed, like the Schneider. Using a 30A EVSE for a volt is fine but only is supplying 3.3KW or under 15A.
 

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They are cApable of delivering more than the car can use. You are limited to 3.3 kWh by the car. The car sets the rate used, the charger may be capable of higher rates with other cars. ...like the Leaf. The GM owners manual recommends at least a 20 amp circuit for 240v on page 9-52. It is conservative.
 

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For the Volt a 20A 240V breaker is fine. But if you may be getting another EV in the future, a 40A 240V service would be more capable and future-proof.
 

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I noticed that some level 2 - 240 volt chargers require 16amp, some 20amps and some even 40amps. What is the difference? Is it charging times?

LS.
Obviously a higher amperage equals a faster charge. As others have pointed out, the Volt doesn't care if it's more than 16A because that's the most it will ever need given the 3.3kW onboard charger. However if you're thinking of another EV it might be worth the extra capacity.

Another thing to keep in mind is that the NEC and CEC guidelines state that electrical circuits should only be loaded to 80% of the circuit's maximum current. Thus, on a 15A circuit you shouldn't draw more than 12A. Subsequently, a 16A EVSE requires wiring sized for 20A, and a 32A EVSE requires a 40A circuit.
 

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I have been told if I was installing a brand new dedicated 240V line for a EV I should consider a minimum of a 30 amp circuit to future proof your investment. I will ask for two quotes one for a 30 amp and one for a 40 amp circuit.

When it comes to moving this much electricity through my house I subscribe to Big Daddy Don Garlit's mantra as it relates to HP - If SOME is GOOD and MORE is BETTER than TOO MUCH is just RIGHT.
 

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BAZINGA,

I would do the 20 or the 40 amp because not all EVSEs have their charge rates adjustable and the 40 amp supply supports most stock 32 amp Level 2 EVSE models. It's not worth installing a 30 amp circuit in my opinion, it would limit your EVSE purchase options to get more than 16 amp out of it anyways. Personally a 40 amp line would be my choice and would suit most EV needs. The cost of 8 gauge wire is not astronomically higher than 12 gauge wire, the installation labor is your major cost consideration.

Stephen

I have been told if I was installing a brand new dedicated 240V line for a EV I should consider a minimum of a 30 amp circuit to future proof your investment. I will ask for two quotes one for a 30 amp and one for a 40 amp circuit.

When it comes to moving this much electricity through my house I subscribe to Big Daddy Don Garlit's mantra as it relates to HP - If SOME is GOOD and MORE is BETTER than TOO MUCH is just RIGHT.
 

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This thread is 8 years old! But as long as you revived it.....

In my new house, I had a spare 30 amp 220v circuit so I put a Clipper Creek LCS-25 on it. Really only needs a 25 amp breaker since it only draws 20 amps max. It can output 4.8 KW.

At my old house I had my a Clipper Creek CS-60 installed, it’s a monster. 60 amp breaker, it can draw 48 amps and output 11.5 KW. I gave it to my son to install for his Tesla when he buys a house.
 
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