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Discussion Starter #1
I've wired a 220v/240v outlet at home and ready to buy a Level 2 charger.

What the difference between them? There seems to be quite a few options.

I'm planning to mount the charger on the inside wall of my garage and just run the cord under the garage door....maybe get one of those docks to mount to the outside wall. Are only certain J1772 charge plugs weatherproof?

Do I need a fancy WiFi one? What would that do for me other than monitor unwanted charging...Not overly concerned that someone would park in my driveway and use my charger...pretty safe neighborhood.

Are there only one or two Chevy "approved" or does that matter?
 

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I've wired a 220v/240v outlet at home and ready to buy a Level 2 charger.

What the difference between them? There seems to be quite a few options.

I'm planning to mount the charger on the inside wall of my garage and just run the cord under the garage door....maybe get one of those docks to mount to the outside wall. Are only certain J1772 charge plugs weatherproof?

Do I need a fancy WiFi one? What would that do for me other than monitor unwanted charging...Not overly concerned that someone would park in my driveway and use my charger...pretty safe neighborhood.

Are there only one or two Chevy "approved" or does that matter?
All Electrical Vehicle Service Equipment (EVSE), used for Level 1 and Level 2 charging, do pretty much the same thing. The Level 1 EVSE that comes with the Volt is designed for 120VAC and 12 amps maximum. Level 2 charging on the Volt is limited to 240VAC and 15 amps. If you install a higher power rated Level 2 EVSE than one that is specified for 3.6kw, the maximum required by the Volt, the car won't charge any faster; it takes about 4.5 hours @ 240VAC for a full charge. You may want to install a higher power EVSE in anticipation of future charging needs.

You don't need the EVSE to have wi-fi or BT or any other form of internet connectivity. The Volt has OnStar and can signal via SMS text messaging when the Volt is due to be plugged in (according to a schedule you set), when charging has been initiated, completed or interrupted. With OnStar and Voltstats you can access charging data.

The power cord on the EVSE is short, usually about 12", terminating in a molded plug. What type of receptacle did you use when you installed the 240 circuit? The length of the cord from the EVSE to the J1772 plug is about 22 - 25 ft maximum.

The popular brands (at least on the Chevy Volt forum) are Clipper Creek and Juicebox. I believe that Chevrolet uses Siemens EVSE and can arrange for an electrician to install a circuit and the EVSE at your home. You can charge the Volt using any Level 1 or Level 2 EVSE that has the J1772 specification. The Volt does not support DC fast charging, CCS, CHadeMo or the Tesla charging options. The new Chevy Bolt EV supports Level 1, Level 2 (240V, 32 amps for up to 7.7kw) and CCS (Bolt supports 50 to 55kw charging at up to 150 amps. You won't find CCS in many places yet and it is not intended for charging at home.)

The J1772 port was designed for all weather use. Current does not flow through the J1772 connection until the J1772 connector is plugged in and the EVSE and the charger (in the Volt the charger is built into the vehicle) agree on the voltage and maximum amperage for the charging session. The manufacturer will specify if the EVSE is weather proof or needs to be installed indoors such as inside a garage.
 

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Do I need a fancy WiFi one? What would that do for me other than monitor unwanted charging...Not overly concerned that someone would park in my driveway and use my charger...pretty safe neighborhood.
Usually the WiFi enabled ones will give you access via the internet to extra data. Power used, cost, and time, etc. A nice feature if you are prone to play with numbers and data graphs.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
All Electrical Vehicle Service Equipment (EVSE), used for Level 1 and Level 2 charging, do pretty much the same thing. The Level 1 EVSE that comes with the Volt is designed for 120VAC and 12 amps maximum. Level 2 charging on the Volt is limited to 240VAC and 15 amps. If you install a higher power rated Level 2 EVSE than one that is specified for 3.6kw, the maximum required by the Volt, the car won't charge any faster; it takes about 4.5 hours @ 240VAC for a full charge. You may want to install a higher power EVSE in anticipation of future charging needs.
So it sounds like the cheap $300 - $400 Level 2 chargers would work OK for me. I have a 50amp circuit available.
You don't need the EVSE to have wi-fi or BT or any other form of internet connectivity. The Volt has OnStar and can signal via SMS text messaging when the Volt is due to be plugged in (according to a schedule you set), when charging has been initiated, completed or interrupted. With OnStar and Voltstats you can access charging data.

The power cord on the EVSE is short, usually about 12" terminating in a molded plug. What type of receptacle did you use when you installed the 240 circuit? The length of the cord from the EVSE to the J1772 plug is about 22 - 25 ft maximum.
the receptacle isn't an issue. I can re-wire whatever type is needed. They are fairly cheap at HomeDepot/Lowes. The cord length from teh included EVSE that came with the Volt is plenty long enough. What's its length?
The popular brands (at least on the Chevy Volt forum) are Clipper Creek and Juicebox. I believe that Chevrolet uses Siemens EVSE and can arrange for an electrician to install a circuit and the EVSE at your home. You can charge the Volt using any Level 1 or Level 2 EVSE that has the J1772 specification. The Volt does not support DC fast charging, CCS, CHadeMo or the Tesla charging options. The new Chevy Bolt EV supports Level 1, Level 2 (at up to 6.6kw) and CCS (you won't find CCS in many places yet and it is not intended for charging at home.)
I watched a youtube review of the JuiceBox. I like the smartphone app features but the 40A Pro...but isn't that overkill for my 2017 Volt? Seems like more EVSE that I need unless I had a Bolt?
The J1772 port was designed for all weather use. Current does not flow through the J1772 connection until the J1772 connector is plugged in and the charger (in the Volt the charger is inside the vehicle) agree on the Voltage and maximum amperage for the charging session. The manufacturer will specify if the EVSE is weather proof or needs to be installed indoors such as inside a garage.
OK...I don't need weatherproof EVSE since I'm installing inside mt Garage....and the J1772 plug can remain outside, run under the garage door.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Usually the WiFi enabled ones will give you access via the internet to extra data. Power used, cost, and time, etc. A nice feature if you are prone to play with numbers and data graphs.
I watched a youtube review of the JuiceBox 40 Pro. I like the smartphone app features of the 40A Pro...seems overkill for my 2017 Volt, though...no?
 

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"I watched a youtube review of the JuiceBox. I like the smartphone app features but the 40A Pro...but isn't that overkill fo rmy Volt? More EVSE that I need?"

A 40 Amp EVSE is overkill for the Volt and would be much more expensive than what the Volt requires. Many choose a Level 2 EVSE like the Clipper Creek LCS-20 EVSE, designed for a maximum load of 16 amps on a 20 amp circuit (Volt draws a maximum of 15 amps) at 240VAC.
 

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Go with a 40 amp charger since you have a 50 amp outlet. You will be good (future proof) for many years with a 40 Amp charger.
Juicebox, Clipper Creek or Leviton chargers are good and have 3 year warranties.
 

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J1772 is J1772. You're not really going to get a "wrong" one per se, and they'll typically have weather resistant (not waterproof) features.

The maximum you're going to get your Volt to charge is ~3.6kW, which is around 16 amps. Anything above that is overkill, for the Volt. The car can let you know what's going on with the charge sessions, so that makes having a WiFi connected unit less important.

Or you could save some money, and for less than $100, use an L2 adapter on the EVSE that came with your car. ;)
 

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J1772 is J1772. You're not really going to get a "wrong" one per se, and they'll typically have weather resistant (not waterproof) features.

The maximum you're going to get your Volt to charge is ~3.6kW, which is around 16 amps. Anything above that is overkill, for the Volt. The car can let you know what's going on with the charge sessions, so that makes having a WiFi connected unit less important.

Or you could save some money, and for less than $100, use an L2 adapter on the EVSE that came with your car. ;)
The standard EVSE is limited to 12 amps so charging with the L2 adapter will take longer than it would at 15 amps.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
J1772 is J1772. You're not really going to get a "wrong" one per se, and they'll typically have weather resistant (not waterproof) features.

The maximum you're going to get your Volt to charge is ~3.6kW, which is around 16 amps. Anything above that is overkill, for the Volt. The car can let you know what's going on with the charge sessions, so that makes having a WiFi connected unit less important.

Or you could save some money, and for less than $100, use an L2 adapter on the EVSE that came with your car. ;)
Yea...I made an adapter to hook-up the stock charger to our construction generator (240V) at work. we power the construction tools and construction trailer with a diesel generator. Charges up from dead in 4 hrs.
 

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I'd go with the LCS-20 EVSE (see my signature)
I've had it since February 2014 and have had no issues at all with it charging my 2014 and now my 2017 Volt.
yea...wow...that pretty inexpensive considering the cost of all others out there (AV, JuiceBox, GE, Seimans, ect). Where to buy from? Amazon? Elsewhere?
 

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Yea...I made an adapter to hook-up the stock charger to our construction generator (240V) at work. we power the construction tools and construction trailer with a diesel generator. Charges up from dead in 4 hrs.
Are you charging a Gen 1 or Gen 2 Volt? If Gen 1 that could be why it only takes 4 hours. Gen 2 makes more of the total battery capacity available for use.
 

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yea...wow...that pretty inexpensive considering the cost of all others out there (AV, JuiceBox, GE, Seimans, ect). Where to buy from? Amazon? Elsewhere?
Right here: chevy-volt-chevy-bolt-ev-level-2-charge.

Pick your plug and your net cost delivered is less than $80. Chris TX is a regular contributor to this forum and the owner of that etsy business.
 

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Right here: chevy-volt-chevy-bolt-ev-level-2-charge.

Pick your plug and your net cost delivered is less than $80. Chris TX is a regular contributor to this forum and the owner of that etsy business.
This doesn't make sense. The converter being offered is a 240 female to 110 male. Don't you need the exact opposite? And then wouldn't you just need a plug adapter which is a lot less expensive?
 

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This doesn't make sense. The converter being offered is a 240 female to 110 male. Don't you need the exact opposite? And then wouldn't you just need a plug adapter which is a lot less expensive?
It actually looks like a NEMA 5-15r to a nema 6-50p so 120 to 240 adapter.
But this is kinda getting off topic to OPs question.
 

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This doesn't make sense. The converter being offered is a 240 female to 110 male. Don't you need the exact opposite? And then wouldn't you just need a plug adapter which is a lot less expensive?
The adapter cable in the photo looks like it has a 14-30 or 14-50 male connector (for 240V) on the left end and the text states that the female connector on the right is 5-15r (normally used for 120V) locking connector with warning labels on the 5-15r that it is wired for 240V.
 

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The adapter cable in the photo looks like it has a 14-30 or 14-50 male connector (for 240V) on the left end and the text states that the female connector on the right is 5-15r (normally used for 120V) locking connector with warning labels on the 5-15r that it is wired for 240V.
Maybe you guys are looking at a different picture than me. It sure looks like a standard 5-15r male connector on the left. Can't see the right female end.
 
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