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Is there anything inherent in the 2014 Volt that would cause that Tire to consistently lose air?

It's been replaced once because I had a puncture be even before that, and now on a new tire,

It is consistently at lower pressure and loses air at a much faster rate than the others.
 

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Is there anything inherent in the 2014 Volt that would cause that Tire to consistently lose air?
...
Yes, there is!! :p

It has a tire, on that particular corner, made of rubber.

It has a leak. Find a good tire shop that can find, AND fix, that leak.
You may have a defective rim.
A good tires shop should be able to find that condition also.
 

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Yes, there is!! :p

It has a tire, on that particular corner, made of rubber.

It has a leak. Find a good tire shop that can find, AND fix, that leak.
You may have a defective rim.
A good tires shop should be able to find that condition also.
+1 Time for Big O to step in. :)
 

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This is a solvable problem. If your current tire shop can't do it, try another one.

It could be corrosion of the rim where the tire seals against it. Or a cracked rim.

You are using a tire pressure gauge right? It may be a problem with the TPMS.

If it's leaking that fast, a dunk in a water tank could reveal the issue.
 

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Yeah, you either have a wheel issue, or an issue on your new tire.

Story time: I hit a storm drain with an old car I had, that was deep enough to cause a leak in my oil pan. Luckily caught it and had it replaced. The next day, I went through some construction and was forced by people directing traffic to drive over some large rocks. One struck my brand new oil pan and I had the same issue.

I was briefly known as the "oil pan man" at the car dealership. If I had ignored the oil warning light assuming that it can't be my brand new oil pan, I'd be out an engine. The main point is, just because you fixed an issue, doesn't mean a new one hasn't come up with your replacement.

The easiest explanation is usually the right one.
 

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few suggestions ... check valve stem. check that tire is tightly sealed against wheel. check for damage to wheel.
BINGO, before doing ANYTHING else, mix up some dish detergent in a small cup and drizzle it over the valve stem. Look for bubbles. Cost's almost nothing to eliminate that and then move on to bigger more expensive problems.
 

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This is a solvable problem. If your current tire shop can't do it, try another one.

It could be corrosion of the rim where the tire seals against it. Or a cracked rim.

You are using a tire pressure gauge right? It may be a problem with the TPMS.

If it's leaking that fast, a dunk in a water tank could reveal the issue.
Not everyone has a water tank big enough for a tire. Another option is to spray some fantastik (or anything soapy) on the tire. As for whether there is anything thet causes the rear tires to get more punctures than fronts, if there was a tack on the road, often the front tire hit some it, sets it so the pointy part is up, so the rear tire gets the puncture. Although about a month ago, my left front tire got an interesting crack in the rim. Luckily, I was able to buy a new matching rim (custom Sport Edition P4).
 

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GM test

Most cars have alloy rims nowadays. And unlike steel rims, a fair number of these wheels leak air. It's not a bead-seat surface leak, where air can creep out between the rim and rubber, but a leak through porosities(the state or quality of being porous...:) ) in the cast-aluminum alloy. GM has a published repair procedure for this problem: Inflate the tire to 40 psi or so, and immerse the whole thing in a conventional dunk tank. Mark the rim with a grease pencil where the bubbles form. Then pull the rim out of the water, and demount the tire from the rim. Scuff lightly with 80-grit sandpaper. Dry off and clean the area corresponding to the leak on the inside of the rim with carb cleaner or mineral spirits, and cover it with a thin layer of silicone gasket sealer. (Don't use silicone tub caulk, which outgases acetic acid as it cures; it will corrode the metal wheel and may damage any tire-pressure monitoring-system sender.) Allow it to cure a few hours, then remount and rebalance the tire.
 

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In Texas, we have swimming pools and lakes. Just sayin'. :)
I hear ya'! But how do you differentiate between the bubbles from the cabin as opposed to the tire/wheel? I can't figure that out.:p;)
 

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I hear ya'! But how do you differentiate between the bubbles from the cabin as opposed to the tire/wheel? I can't figure that out.:p;)


In this case they are testing just the left side tires for leaks...
 

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In this case they are testing just the left side tires for leaks...
Funny, all of my tire punctures have been on the passenger rear tire. So to make sure, you should just submerge the entire car with the windows open so those bubbles come out first. The tire leak will have a continuous stream of small bubbles.
 

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Is there anything inherent in the 2014 Volt that would cause that Tire to consistently lose air?

It's been replaced once because I had a puncture be even before that, and now on a new tire,

It is consistently at lower pressure and loses air at a much faster rate than the others.
I have the same problem with my '12.

Left rear consistently lower than the rest. Dealer rotated it to RF, ignoring my complaint it lost air. Later removed the nail in the RF that I found and properly patched the leak. Now LR again is lower than the rest.
 

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Funny thread. My '11 Volt has a right rear tire leak that has been looked at twice. Replaced valve, sanded/filed rim for any rough spots, dunk tank doesn't show it, etc. Nothing has seemed to work. It was our 3rd car and not used by my son while he was in college so limited usage. (now it may be my driver tho... we'll see). We fill it up every once in a while as we watch it. Figured we were replacing all tires in the future and that would be the end of it.
 

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I was just getting started with angeling out my car (opposite of murdered out) and discovered my passenger rear rim has a crack in it. This is my second rim in 2 months. I blame a specific spot with railroad tracks that I've felt like someone took a battering ram and hit my car. These are aftermarket 18" wheels, so I have less rubber to cushion the blow. So basically, I need to drive much more carefully and avoid any and all potholes. New rim from Tire Rack already ordered. It's hard to tell whether I'm just rough with them or whether these are flaws from the factory that work themselves in over time. If I end up replacing any more, maybe I should spend a little more than $114=118 per wheel for something built a little better. Needless to say, I no longer drive on Randolph or State north of Church (corner of church and state) in Champaign, IL as that's the only time I remember hitting something hard.
 

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OP, are you still on the OEM Goodyears? If so take a close look at that tire and see if it has surface cracks in the sidewall. If so replace it. The OEM Goodyear Fuelmax Assurance tended to have thin sidewalls and any surface cracking could be a sign of dry rot. I had one like this on my 2012 Cruze ECO and ended up replacing the tires early.
 

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Ever since I started keeping my tires at 40-42 psi, my tire pressure has remained rock steady except for seasonal temperature variations. Previously, the tires were always needing a top off.
 

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Ever since I started keeping my tires at 40-42 psi, my tire pressure has remained rock steady except for seasonal temperature variations. Previously, the tires were always needing a top off.
Does your comment imply that the bead of the rim (higher pressure tighter fit) is where you thought the leaking was occurring?
 
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