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I recently replaced both my front and rear turn signal bulbs with LED bulbs from ijdmtoy.com which required load resistors to avoid the hyper flashing issue. They worked and looked great, so I decided to replace the reverse bulbs and brake lights with LED as well. I bought these bulbs to replace the reverse lights. I didn't think that I would need load resistors for reverse lights, but when I installed them, I noticed that they stay dimly lit all the time, only turning off after about 10 minutes when the vehicle system goes into "sleep mode" I suppose. They light up full powered when shifted to reverse. I have read elsewhere that this is because there is a weak current that runs through the circuit all the time that doesn't have an effect on incandescent bulbs, but cause more efficient LED lights to light up all the time. Does anyone know if there is a fix to this problem other than adding load resistors? I already have load resistors zip tied behind the tail light assembly for the turn signals and theres not much room to add another load resistor on each side for reverse lights as well, so I'd like to avoid that if possible. I'd appreciate any advice!
 

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I recently replaced both my front and rear turn signal bulbs with LED bulbs from ijdmtoy.com which required load resistors to avoid the hyper flashing issue. They worked and looked great, so I decided to replace the reverse bulbs and brake lights with LED as well. I bought these bulbs to replace the reverse lights. I didn't think that I would need load resistors for reverse lights, but when I installed them, I noticed that they stay dimly lit all the time, only turning off after about 10 minutes when the vehicle system goes into "sleep mode" I suppose. They light up full powered when shifted to reverse. I have read elsewhere that this is because there is a weak current that runs through the circuit all the time that doesn't have an effect on incandescent bulbs, but cause more efficient LED lights to light up all the time. Does anyone know if there is a fix to this problem other than adding load resistors? I already have load resistors zip tied behind the tail light assembly for the turn signals and theres not much room to add another load resistor on each side for reverse lights as well, so I'd like to avoid that if possible. I'd appreciate any advice!
Pretty sure you'll need the load resistor. The current is there all the time so that the car can warn drivers if the bulb is out. No current = bulb out.
 

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I replaced both my reverse lights and license plate lights with LEDs, and I noticed this same behavior. Since it turns off after the car completely powers down, what is the problem? Just curious.

--Chris
 

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I replaced both my reverse lights and license plate lights with LEDs, and I noticed this same behavior. Since it turns off after the car completely powers down, what is the problem? Just curious.

--Chris
The problem comes in two parts.
1) They aren't supposed to be on when driving and even a "glow" may attract the attention of a cop
2) In some cases you may wind up throwing an error code because the system thinks the bulb is "out" due to the low resistance.

It's up to you to decide if this is something you want to worry about.
 

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You only need to add one resistor to the backup lights. Pick a side. If after you add the resistor, if the backup lights start to blink, reverse the bulb where you put the resistor.

Search for the posts below by Teksavy. He soldered together three 1/4 watt, 470 Ohm resistors. They don't take up much space. You can find them on Amazon.

LED "bulb" upgrade... hit some roadblocks

It's Post #32 below the dashes.
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Dare I say that I have finally licked all issues? Jinx? No.. I think I got it!

The last problem I had to overcome was the autodimming mirror (LTZ trim only) stopped dimming with the reverse LED bulbs installed. This was because the autodimming mirrors have a reverse +12V line going to them to tell the mirror to turn off when you are in reverse to aid backing up.

What was happening was the 470 Ohm resistor I installed prevented the LEDs from glowing, but it was allowing a charge of more than 5 volts to build up on the reverse line. (9 volts to be exact.)

Trial and error led me to a value of 156 Ohm (Qty 3 1/4W 470 Ohm resistors wired in parallel) to be the ideal value to keep the voltage build up at bay while not burning up when the reverse lights were engaged. Lower values (say 75 Ohm for example) got really hot when the reverse lights were on.

The autodimming mirror works like it should and all issues have been resolved. Next up... a new DIY!

-Ed
 

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If you have a radio shack nearby you can get resistors in their electronic parts section. Otherwise most electronics repair shops should be able to get you some.
 

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You also need to take the wattage into consideration. Watts dissipated by a resistor is the square of the voltage divided by the resistance. For 470 ohms at 14.5 volts,, this is .45 watts. The 1/2 watt resistors referenced would work, but I would be more comfortable with 1 watt resistors. When you parallel the 3 resistors, try to separate them somewhat so they can better shed the heat.

Dick
 

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Any updates on this?

I ordered a set of these and have some 50 watt resistors laying around here somewhere, when needed.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01H57FXWA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00
Yeah, those didn't work and in fact seemed to knock out my reverse lights for a minute.

These white LED's worked great:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MC6RQAM/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage

and used one of these resistors:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0776P82J8/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage

I soldered the resistor to the wires by the left rear socket and heat-shrinked everything.
 

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I’m somewhat surprised that there are any non-LED bulbs in the Volt at all with energy consumption being a big issue and how inexpensive LEDs are now
 

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I’m somewhat surprised that there are any non-LED bulbs in the Volt at all with energy consumption being a big issue and how inexpensive LEDs are now
When Gen1 was designed there was probably limited availability and high cost. Perhaps even when Gen2 was designed.
 
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