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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well it has been a good ride, but it is time to leave
I leased my 2015 volt in October 2015 and it had 31 original miles on her.
I tried to keep my volt, but GM just wanted me to jump through hoops
No thank you!
I bought a 2017 Hyundai ioniq sel
With fully loaded options, it us equal in accessories including backup camera and lane avoidance and heated seats/ door mirrors
 

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Personally, I'd have shopped G2 Volts. Shopping right, with $7500 Fed credit, private offers, and GM points keeps the pricing attractive. I don't drive a Volt to save the planet or save money, I drive because I like driving it.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I got a great deal from Hyundai on the his great hybrid
I got a 10 year/100,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty
And a lifetime battery warranty
I also got it for $23,000
$5,000 off the list price
I got it is the day after labor day
 

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I got a great deal from Hyundai on the his great hybrid
I got a 10 year/100,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty
And a lifetime battery warranty
I also got it for $23,000
$5,000 off the list price
I got it is the day after labor day
That's about what we paid for the max trim 2017 Volt Premier with all options but custom paint. $7500 Fed, $1500 State, $450 Utility, $6800 GM and dealer. Work electricity is free, and it's needed 35 gallons of gas in 11,000 miles so far with 1/2 tank left in it.

Had to add AutoX worthy self-sealing tires, but no other operational cost other than <$100 of gas and a free GM servicing.
 

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Well, Chevy had 5 or 6 years to create a sales chain reaction, but for many reasons it hasn't happened. Now, real competition has arrived
and Volt's only selling point is having best in class range, but that won't last. Sure hope there's a mid-cycle rabbit in Chevy's hat.
 

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I got a great deal from Hyundai on the his great hybrid
I got a 10 year/100,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty
And a lifetime battery warranty
I also got it for $23,000
$5,000 off the list price
I got it is the day after labor day
Is this the hybrid or the plug in version? Sorry to see you leaving the best kept automotive secret in America. Let us know how the Ionic holds up as I haven't been impressed with Korean appliances or cars so far.
 

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Is this the hybrid or the plug in version? Sorry to see you leaving the best kept automotive secret in America. Let us know how the Ionic holds up as I haven't been impressed with Korean appliances or cars so far.
Went to the Hyundai web site to check the ioniq out and learned the plug in version is only available in California.
 

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Went to the Hyundai web site to check the ioniq out and learned the plug in version is only available in California.
So going from a gen1 volt to an Ionic hybrid is a huge step backwards, unless you are driving hundreds of miles a day

So next question to the OP, did you buy or lease the Ioniq Hybrid?
 

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So going from a gen1 volt to an Ionic hybrid is a huge step backwards, unless you are driving hundreds of miles away.

So next question to the OP, did you buy or lease the Ioniq Hybrid?
It sounds like he bought since he got 5k off the MSRP.

Probably could have got a gen 2 Volt for near the same price after all rebates and discounts are considered. I agree, seems like a step backwards to keep tightening the noose of oil around your neck, but oh well, you must love buying gas and people like what they like no matter what other people may think.
 

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That's about what we paid for the max trim 2017 Volt Premier with all options but custom paint. $7500 Fed, $1500 State, $450 Utility, $6800 GM and dealer. Work electricity is free, and it's needed 35 gallons of gas in 11,000 miles so far with 1/2 tank left in it.

Had to add AutoX worthy self-sealing tires, but no other operational cost other than <$100 of gas and a free GM servicing.
^ This guy gets it ^ :D
 

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Well, Chevy had 5 or 6 years to create a sales chain reaction, but for many reasons it hasn't happened. Now, real competition has arrived
and Volt's only selling point is having best in class range, but that won't last. Sure hope there's a mid-cycle rabbit in Chevy's hat.
What competition specifically?
 

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Well, Chevy had 5 or 6 years to create a sales chain reaction, but for many reasons it hasn't happened. Now, real competition has arrived
and Volt's only selling point is having best in class range, but that won't last. Sure hope there's a mid-cycle rabbit in Chevy's hat.
G2 Volt selling points:

  • The only true EREV without compromise. 161HP (the 120kW thrust is advertised 111kW or 149HP) EV propulsion. Comes with a 9 gallon tank and 101hp DI range extender which will push 161HP via Voltec.
  • 53 mile EV range is perhaps a conservative rating for mixed driving, but in any case, it's REAL EV range, not Limp Mode range.
  • No Hybrid Lag. Full power on tap at all times and all altitudes. 7.5s 0-60mph vs. 8.9s 0-60mph for the Hyundai at sea level.
  • Chevrolet chassis. Some of the world's best engineers create the GM chassis. Doubtful? The Camaro was just compared to some of the fastest $200k cars on earth. http://www.caranddriver.com/features/lightning-lap-2017-every-lap-time-and-full-data-feature This is why a Volt feels so at home in the corners and the highway. It's got Chevy DNA inside.*
  • OnStar, some don't want it, but I love it. Not sure I'll buy a car without an equivalent system. Perhaps the Tesla Model 3 could get an exemption.

* Whether the fastest non-1LE ZL1 is truly $65k+ is debatable. The automatic trans option puts it $830 over the limit, but does it truly lap faster? If the manual (the 1LE is manual) lapped faster, it belongs in the LL2 category.
 

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After enjoying all our dirt cheap electric driving (our gas here in Canada is WAY more expensive vs the US) I could never fathom going to a hybrid that basically runs on gas most of the time. Just last weekend alone for the distance we drove across a 3 day long weekend we saved about $40+ vs what even a Prius would have cost us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I bought my Hyundai Ionia del hybrid
I make just under $30,000 a year, so the $7,500 tax credit won't work for me
Thus car uses EV power up to 50 mph
So I really get better fuel mileage on the highway
It holds 11.7 gallons of gas giving me a range of 633 miles
I am happy
GM wouldn't work with me, so I left
If it is true in 2020 the volt will be no more as we know it
At least my resale value will be better,
But I don't plan on trading it in
 

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I bought my Hyundai Ionia del hybrid
I make just under $30,000 a year, so the $7,500 tax credit won't work for me
Thus car uses EV power up to 50 mph
So I really get better fuel mileage on the highway
It holds 11.7 gallons of gas giving me a range of 633 miles
I am happy
GM wouldn't work with me, so I left
If it is true in 2020 the volt will be no more as we know it
At least my resale value will be better,
But I don't plan on trading it in
When you cannot collect the $7500 credit, you lease, and the price is reduced accordingly since the mfr collects it.

Volts go 101mph uphill on pure EV power. It's the gas engine that is weak, not the electric motor.

My Volt gets better economy than any hybrid the way I use the car, which is almost pure EV. Just over 1000 miles a month.

My gas range is not important in my Volt. The furthest 2 gas stops in the USA are 265 miles apart which is in Alaska heading up to Deadhorse. Big gas tanks are so you don't have to refill often, not for range. It give the impression the fuel economy is better if you put a bigger tank in the car. Downside is it uses valuable room, increases cost and weight (you must support a heavier tank with a stronger and larger structure.

If you are happy that's all that matters. Congrats! It probably is better than a Prius.

Nobody has any idea what's in a 2018 Chevrolet Bolt EV, much less what GM will sell in 2020.

You will not know the resale for years to come. Volt resale is heavy affected by rebates and incentives. Lots of folk paid $25k or less for their Volts, so when the resale is under $15k people freak since the sticker was about $40k.
 

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All good comments right above as usual by Qinsp. Regarding leasing if you can't colllect the $7,500, there are other potential hidden costs in leasing if you are not accustomed to it. You either go under the miles and pay more per mile used or you go over, they bend you over, and it cost more that way too. Then there is the turn in at the end where they determine what is normal wear and tear.

If you are familiar with leasing, know the ins and outs (like bro), it can be a good deal as well. For me, buying has always been the better way to go as we tend to keep our cars for 10+ years...so in my use cases buying works, for others leasing can work if they are savvy.

There are no right and wrong answers as to whether to get an Ioniq (EV available here in CA as well) vs. another Volt, just what's right for each individual. Most of us, me included, would tend toward another Volt. I will say that I'm more interested in pure EV down the road and even that Ioniq pure EV model caught my eye, but the range is still a bit short. The Bolt would be more interesting to me but it is missing ACC and that's a big deal for me after having it now. I just drove my old ICE, no ACC of course, and it does change the driving experience to the downside, especially on the freeways here in So Cal.

For the reasons above I recently signed up for a reservation on a M3 as I may be moving my Volt to my son in the next year or two. My problem with the M3 is the form factor. Limited cargo space and I've really grown the like the hatchback of the Volt. Really, the Volt is an almost perfect vehicle, even as an EREV. If they could pop the range of the Bolt in a Volt, or similar sport sedan hatch, I'd be very happy. I'm pretty sure I'll not be acting on that M3 reservation, just preserving an option when my number is in about a year or so. In that time maybe another option or two will pop up with ACC or equivalent in a form factor that appeals to me.

Back to the OP, congrats on the Ioniq hybrid, I saw one in the wild today on the freeway, my first spotting and it looks as good (to me) in person as in pictures. Not a bad choice at all...
 

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The Ioniq does look better than the Prius. Wayne Gerdes from cleanmpg.com is reviewing a 2017 Hyundai Ioniq Blue, the base model. It looks like it may be the most fuel efficient vehicle you can buy in the U.S. At a steady speed of 70 mph he recorded over 58 mpg, and at
50 mph 85.7 mpg.

http://www.cleanmpg.com/community/index.php?threads/52768/page-9#post-427198

The Volt really shines if you electric rates are low. If you pay high electric rates, .25 KWH or more, the Volt is not your best option. In that case the
Ioniq is an excellent choice.
 
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