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Summary: the car allows rapid charging only once per journey (once per day?). The second attempt to rapid charge is much slower.

Also the range is less than expected. 235 miles advertised, but 168 by the WLTP standard.
 

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Seems Nissan’s ideas of “thermal management” are working just fine—make customers wait longer, and bury the fact!

Surprised about the MUCH lower-than-advertised range, though.
 

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Wow, I'd be super pissed.

But Mr Pitcairn was also disappointed by the range of the new Leaf, which he bought specifically for long journeys.His marketing brochure claimed the car could do 235 miles on a single charge. But having bought the car, he found the range was actually 155 miles.

"That was a disappointment to start with," he said.
"So we have, in my mind, been misled twice, because the claimed range on a full charge is not 235 miles. Secondly, nowhere does it say that you will only be able to rapid charge in 40 minutes only once."

When journalists from What Car? tested the new Leaf, they found a "real world" range of just 108 miles.
Nissan. You pay less and get even less than that.
 

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Summary: the car allows rapid charging only once per journey (once per day?). The second attempt to rapid charge is much slower.

Also the range is less than expected. 235 miles advertised, but 168 by the WLTP standard.
The range is actually in line with expectations. EPA is 151 and WLTP is 168, both easily achievable in real-world driving. The NEDC, which they used initially, requires hypermiling in any car. For example, the Bolt EV's NEDC rated range is 323 miles.

As for the fast charging, it might be worse even than that. Apparently, the way the Leaf works, it checks the battery temperature at the beginning of the DC fast charging session, and it restricts it accordingly. The initial restriction of charging rate starts when the battery is somewhere between 95 and 100 degrees F. To put that into perspective, in one of my recent trips in the Bolt EV, about 150 miles into my first leg, the battery was already 95 F and battery conditioning represented 1% of my total energy usage. In other words, if I were driving the 2018 Leaf, I'd be unlikely to ever see faster than 30 kW charging, which sucks when you're taking a 500-mile trip.
 
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