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Discussion Starter #1
I want to get an L2 charger for my 2013 and in doing my research there's one point i don't get the nuances of: why are there so many NEMA outlet options? for instance, Clipper Creek offers the plug-in LCS 20 with four different NEMA configurations. I've done my best to search the forum but I couldn't find a discussion on why one type of plug might be preferable over the other. Is it simply a matter of what a home may already have so you want to make sure you get that connector? If one is installing from scratch, like I am, which is the optimal choice?
 

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I want to get an L2 charger for my 2013 and in doing my research there's one point i don't get the nuances of: why are there so many NEMA outlet options? for instance, Clipper Creek offers the plug-in LCS 20 with four different NEMA configurations. I've done my best to search the forum but I couldn't find a discussion on why one type of plug might be preferable over the other. Is it simply a matter of what a home may already have so you want to make sure you get that connector? If one is installing from scratch, like I am, which is the optimal choice?
Good question. To be in compliance with the national electrical code for North America the receptacle must match the circuit breaker and wiring for the circuit. The CC LCS-20 requires a dedicated 240V circuit. That said, the LCS-20 can be purchased with different plugs or without a plug depending on your application. A 30 amp circuit requires a 30 amp receptacle and plug, same for a 50 amp circuit requiring a 50 amp rated receptacle.

Why there is no option for the LCS-20P for an L6-20 plug is unknown. If you plan to install an LCS-20 on a 20 amp circuit (the minimum that meets the power and amperage requirements of the LCS-20) then it must be hard wired into the circuit. The plug configurations (30 amp and 50 amp) are in common use today. For example, the NEMA 14-50 receptacle is found in RV parks all over North America, it is very popular for Level 2 EVSE provided your home's electrical panel and service will support an additional 50 amp circuit. If not, then a 30 amp circuit and receptacle or a hard wired 20 amp circuit will have to do. If your home already has an existing 30 amp circuit, such as for a clothes dryer, and a different 30 amp receptacle than NEMA L6-30 or NEMA 14-30 receptacle the receptacle can be easily changed to accommodate the LCS-20P with either an L6-30 or 14-30 plug.

Know that your Volt will never draw more than 15 to 16 amps @ 240V so a circuit and even an EVSE capable of 24 or 32 amps, for example, won't charge your Volt any faster. The higher amperage circuit and EVSE would be for a future EV that can charge at a higher amperage than the Volt. If you are going to install a 240V circuit for charging any EV, it only costs a little more to install heavier gauge wiring for a higher amperage circuit so unless your home's electrical service and panel are already maxed out it makes sense to install a 50 amp dedicated circuit for the future even though the Volt would charge at the maximum charging rate on just a 20 amp circuit.
 

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For example, the NEMA 14-50 receptacle is found in RV parks all over North America
Thank you. Now I know which adapter to purchase from ChrisTX's Etsy store.
 

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Because we have 3 EV's and a total of 5 EVSE's, I 'standardized' my plugs and sockets using L6-20 twistlocks - No matter what plug came on the various EVSE's, I replaced them all with a 20 amp twistlock. They are an industry standard connector, usable for both 120, 208 and 240 volts. I have several receptacles in my garage to plug them into and I've made up a couple of twistlock extension cords which I use for both 120 and 240 volts. I also have a selection of 6 inch adapters with a twistlock on one end and various 120 and 240 volt plugs on the other end which I use when we travel. I like the twistlock plugs and sockets because they lock together and won't pull apart, they have large pins and they don't wear out as quickly as most household plugs and sockets

I agree here in the US we have far too many sockets, especially for 240 volts and that can make it difficult to have the proper plug for use depending on where you want to plug in, but my little bag of adapters from twistlock to the various plugs has me pretty well covered, no matter where I go. I can plug into range outlets, dryer outlets, welder outlets, RV park outlets and any standard socket found in any home and I'm 'legal' because I have extension cords rated for 240 volt use

Don
 

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When I had the garage wired for 240v, I had the electrician use a NEMA 14-50 socket and I ordered a Clipper Creek LCS-20P with NEMA 14-50 plug to match. At the time, had a Tesla Model 3 on pre-order and that is what the Tesla EVSE required. Ended up cancelling the order when I realized that the $35,000 Model 3 was a figment of Elon Musk's imagination.
 

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For me it came down to what I would be most comfortable wiring - 3 wires or 4 wires that included a neutral. My garage was grandfathered such that neutral and ground was not separated at the sub panel. But that is not code now. The NEMA 14-30 and 14-50 receptacles are both 4 wire receptacles. In the end I replaced my NEMA 10-30 circuit with a NEMA 6-20P. We just disconnected the old NEMA 10-30 plug. This way there won't be any accidents if someone plugs something else into the plug. He had to change the amp to 20 amp but I had him wire 8 gauge wire that will support 30 amps if I want that in the future.

I ordered my level 2 from amazon and came with a nice case and free shipping. Seems to be working well:

https://www.amazon.com/Duosida-Port...1544387423&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=level+2+evsa

There is a review of this one on you tube.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks to all for helping me figure this out. my electrician said we could put in whatever i wanted and ultimately for a multitude of usage reasons i've gone with the Duosida which has the NEMA 6020p. at some point for travel options i might also pick up NEMA 14-50 adapter.

i appreciate your help.
 

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For me it came down to what I would be most comfortable wiring - 3 wires or 4 wires that included a neutral. My garage was grandfathered such that neutral and ground was not separated at the sub panel. But that is not code now. The NEMA 14-30 and 14-50 receptacles are both 4 wire receptacles. In the end I replaced my NEMA 10-30 circuit with a NEMA 6-20P. We just disconnected the old NEMA 10-30 plug. This way there won't be any accidents if someone plugs something else into the plug. He had to change the amp to 20 amp but I had him wire 8 gauge wire that will support 30 amps if I want that in the future.

I ordered my level 2 from amazon and came with a nice case and free shipping. Seems to be working well:

https://www.amazon.com/Duosida-Port...1544387423&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=level+2+evsa

There is a review of this one on you tube.
I got one of these about 6 or 7 months ago. Now it is a little cheaper and it comes with an adapter!

The only issue I had with mine is that it was extremely hard to plug into the car when I got it. A few shots of silicone spray and now it slides in almost as easy as the one that came with the car.

Level 2 charging is such a nice perk, especially if you want to do a few trips in a day.

I will have a 120v outlet outside I can use when I come home from work (working nights) and I can plug into when I park. Wifes car is in the garage where the 240v is. I move the car in when I get up, and it charges in less than 3 hrs for what I drive.

Now when I will get up it should have most of the charge done, at least enough to where if I want to go somewhere right away, I can go! The 240v will not have much to do to top it off.

I've had the car for about 16 months or so and it still puts a grin on my face when i drive it. Or even look at for that matter! Ha Ha

Done the plasti-dip on the front "grill", blacked out the bowties front and back. Changed out the center wheel caps to the Camaro ones, black w/silver bowtie. A couple of other little odds and ends to make it mine.

I would buy another one in a heartbeat.
 

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My used 2013 Volt came with a new L2 charger with twist lock (and pigtail with something else). I had a 240V 20amp outlet sitting there used for air compressor (which is used sporadically in summer mostly for sandblasting and air tools). I changed outlet and connector on air compressor to twist lock because it locked in and has relatively big contacts as well. As the subpanel and wiring is external (I added it after the carport was long changed to garage) it was easy to add a 20 amp rocker switch to isolate the EVSE when not in use(which is most of the time).
 

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For 240v (or 208v) charging, EVs only need a three-wire NEMA 6- style connection. That is - 2 hots and safety ground. However as a matter of practicality, NEMA 14 (2 hots, neutral, and safety ground) receptacles are generally used because they are far more common. For example, NEMA 14-30 receptacles are found in newer homes for clothes dryers. And as mentioned previously, for folks on the road, RV parks all over North America offer "50 amp" (NEMA 14-50) receptacles.

The older three-wire NEMA 10- series (2 hots + neutral) are no longer used in new construction. The 1996 NEC (Nat'l Electrical Code) started requiring new construction to use NEMA 14- instead. Obviously almost any home built before 1996 will likely have a 10-30 receptacle for the clothes dryer and kitchen range. Might even have a 10-50 for the range.

Since both NEMA 10- and NEMA-14 include a neutral wire, they can support both 120v and 240v operation. This might be useful for a kitchen range or a clothes dryer - where the electric heating elements run at 240v and the clock/timer/lights run at 120v. Same with an RV where some things run at each voltage.
 

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One of the factor in so many plug types is the current rating of the outlet. A nema 6-20 is for 20 amp circuits. The wiring and breaker has to support 20 amps. Where a NEMA 6-30 is for 30 amps. So if you buy a L2 tha can do 30 amps it won't come with a 6-20 as pullimg 30 amps overloads the outlet. And for each amp rating there are several styles of outlet.

The <gen 1> volt can't pull more than 16amps so a 20 amp outlet and L2 chord works out just fine. I installed a 20 amp circuit for my L2 and bought a 20 amp L2 chord. It came with a nema 6-20 plug so ats the outlet I used :)
 
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