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So, I just bought a used 2016 Volt, and am absolutely LOVING it! Now, I know the new 1.5L engine used in these things is known to be pretty bullet-proof (Ward's 10 best!), and even with 46,000mi all on that ICE engine, I still wouldn't really worry, but: after using the car for a while, definitely over 50% in EV-mode, I was noticing the lifetime mileage, which was about 40mpg, was barely changing; ok, hmm, I thought that 40 was "just to start" and would adjust quickly. Since it wasn't, that means that the car really has 46k mi on it and the average of all those miles is 40mpg?! Did the previous owner just NEVER plug it in?? So, I went to voltstats.net, and saw the same thing: as of the first voltstats reading @ ~46k mi, the car has something like 332 EV miles on it! WTF?! Who buys a Volt and refuels it like a Prius?

Am I missing something here? Is it really possible this person drove the car in EV mode basically from the dealership to home, and just put gas in it from there on out? Has anybody else bought a used Volt and seen something different, like a more reasonable split in their EV/gas miles on voltstats.net? Thanks so much everybody!

EDIT: Just tried to post the link to my car's voltstats.net page, but I don't have enough posts yet. My car# is:#2016-26901; hope this helps!
 

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A couple of ideas, first somebody bought for HOV access and/or another party was paying for the gas.
Back in 2013 I talked to a GE field engineer who never plugged in his corporate volt. Had a company gas card, drove many miles per day, and hotels don't have chargers.
 

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I had a similar situation when I bought my 2017 used in September 2017. In one year, they had put 18,000 miles on it and only 1/3 of the miles were electric. I suppose with that many miles in a year, maybe the commute was just horrendous and they obviously charged it some in order to put 6000 EV miles on it in a total of 18,000 miles. So nowhere near as drastic as your situation but yeah, someone bought yours and just used it as a gas car.

Mike
 

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It makes a fine, well-performing hybrid. Much zippier than most other 40+ MPG cars.
 

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Maybe they lived in an apartment or condo where they could not recharge it at home at all - They bought it knowing that it gets 40 mpg and gave them access to the HOV lanes

Don
 

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Some Volts are bought by companies to greenwash their image and get a tax incentive. Maybe some individuals do that too. It is a nice car even if you don’t take advantage of all the capabilities.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Water under the bridge. From this point, if you are like many Gen 2 Volt owners, your 2016 Volt will probably be driven close to 90% EV miles, eventually the lifetime EV miles driven will be higher than the ICE miles.
 

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Keep in mind that MPG is a meaningless number for a vehicle capable of moving down the road without using any gas at all or one that can choose to use gas when it does not need to do so.

If your daily commute, for example, is 21 miles to work, then 21 miles home again, you can choose to drive the entire trip in Hold Mode, using 1 gallon of gas at window sticker rates, and for the daily commute, MPG= 42.

Choose to use the battery in one direction, Hold in the other, and for the same daily commute, MPG = 84.

Choose to drive the entire commute on battery power only, and for the same daily commute, MPG = 250+.

By the by, increasing your "lifetime mileage" will, indeed, be a very slow process because your car has already consumed a lot of gas. With 47,475.59 miles on the odometer and an MPG of 41.08, your Volt’s lifetime gas consumption is odo/MPG = 1,155.7 gallons. That’s also the number of electric miles you need to drive without using any gas at all to increase the MPG by 1.0000.

IOW, if you can drive on grid battery power only for the next five weeks or so (at 200+ miles per week) until the odometer reads 48,631.29 miles, you will increase your lifetime MPG to 42.08.

By the by, not all battery powered miles are recorded as Electric Miles. The energy usage screen tracks miles driven in Electric Mode (using grid battery power) vs miles driven in Extended Range Mode (when using the range extender), not miles driven on battery power vs miles driven when the engine is running. If you drive down a long hill in Hold Mode or with a fully depleted battery, regenerative braking will put some charge back into the battery. At the bottom of the hill, the car will then use that regen battery power to drive some battery powered miles that will be counted as Gas Miles.
 

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Regarding "gas miles" coming from regen power - how else would you propose to count them? If you've used your whole battery pack so you're in mandatory CS mode, then you go down a long hill and regen say 500 watts. Those 500 watts are used while sustaining the charge via the ICE.

If they didn't count towards the gas miles, then the car would probably struggle to hit over low 30 mpg. It only gets higher than most other compact small ICE cars by regenerating a lot of the otherwise waste heat during braking.


I've seen this point highlighted here before, and I'm confused why people think it's not the right way to do it.
 

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"noticing the lifetime mileage, which was about 40mpg"

Yeah, that's a good indicator of how the car has been used in the past. Mine says 76mpge, and I've driven 70% electric.

As others have noted, it's not that odd for a company car to have only been driven on gas, with gas paid for on a company credit card. The employee probably didn't have an outlet, and the company may not have offered to pay to have a 240v one put in.
 

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Just curious, do you need to actually have onstar active to use voltstats?

I checked the site, it's not in their FAQ (but seems pretty darn relevant).
 

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Yes, an active OnStar account of SOME KIND is necessary.
Just to add, OnStar does have a free plan for new subscribers. They'll give you 3 months of their best plan and drop you down to the free plan for the remainder of the 3 years. That free plan also works for Voltstats and also gives you fob capability through their app so you can lock/unlock and precondition from your phone.
 

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Just to add, OnStar does have a free plan for new subscribers. They'll give you 3 months of their best plan and drop you down to the free plan for the remainder of the 3 years. That free plan also works for Voltstats and also gives you fob capability through their app so you can lock/unlock and precondition from your phone.
The OnStar plans have changed, the new plans are effective May 1, 2018. The article in this link does a good job of explaining the various plans: http://canada.autonews.com/article/20180430/CANADA01/304309996/gm-positions-onstar-as-revenue-centre-brand-builder
 

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So, I just bought a used 2016 Volt, and ... WTF?! Who buys a Volt and refuels it like a Prius?
I had to laugh at the "WTF". There was another used Volt purchaser on Volt-stats who named his car "WTF? All miles on gas!" or something very close to that. I would look him up every so often, and cheer him on from my living room as the MPG s..l..o..w..l..y crept higher. Haven't seen him for a while. I guess his Onstar subscription expired (or he changed the name of his car!).

Looks like I'll be rooting for you now! Go, White Lightning!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks everybody for your input; actually, the whole "it was a company car" thing make perfect sense now, the way the used car came – if that makes sense – seems to support that now that I think of it. I also agree with most of you that it really doesn't matter as far as ICE wear and tear, but what does worry me is the idea of the battery pack being dead for 3 years...any thoughts on that one? Thanks again!
 

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Thanks everybody for your input; actually, the whole "it was a company car" thing make perfect sense now, the way the used car came – if that makes sense – seems to support that now that I think of it. I also agree with most of you that it really doesn't matter as far as ICE wear and tear, but what does worry me is the idea of the battery pack being dead for 3 years...any thoughts on that one? Thanks again!
My guess, and that's all this really is, would be Chevy designed the battery to withstand many different kinds of extremes.

All that said and done my recommendation to you is to not worry about it. You've already committed by virtue of having purchased the car. Worrying about it won't change anything (unless you plan to immediately dispose of it). Enjoy your new car!
 

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... but what does worry me is the idea of the battery pack being dead for 3 years...any thoughts on that one? Thanks again!
The battery was never "dead". It was maintained at the minimum state of charge, and propelled the car for most (if not all) of its 48000 miles. Don't worry. Be happy. You've got a Volt!
 

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Thanks everybody for your input; actually, the whole "it was a company car" thing make perfect sense now, the way the used car came – if that makes sense – seems to support that now that I think of it. I also agree with most of you that it really doesn't matter as far as ICE wear and tear, but what does worry me is the idea of the battery pack being dead for 3 years...any thoughts on that one? Thanks again!
It wasn't dead. It was charging and using about 4-5% of the available capacity every time it was being driven -- regen still happened, there was still the Charge Sustain "window" between running the engine and not running the engine at lights and stop signs, Mountain Mode still put a buffer onto the battery if the owner used it, and all that stuff counts as "gas miles" in any post-2012 car. That's perfectly reasonable use for lithium ion batteries, and leads to VERY long life.
 
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