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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The fix is in!!!

On the Chevy Volts EVSE, DO NOT CONNECT the Proximity Pin (PP) onto pin 5. It is for lighting the diode or whatever else you want to power with 15VDC. The Control Pilot (CP) on pin 4 needs 150 ohms across it, to ground. You do NOT need the 330 Ohm resistor and switch, though it will not power down the car as you remove the plug.

One switch will work. It has to have one side Normally Closed (NC) and the other side Normally Open (NO) with a common ground. The NC side has the 330 ohm resistor across it, and a 150 ohm resistor in series with it. When NOT depressed you'll read 150 ohms from CP to ground (PE), when it IS depressed, it will read 480 ohms. The other side has the LED wired from the Gray w/Purple striped wire coming from the EVSE, to a resisor, (I used a 1K ohm resistor) to Ground (PE).

NEW CORRECT DIAGRAM


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I broke my EVSE. Ripped the wires right out of the pins, didn't break the plastic handle, but it came apart where the pins are.

I've since taken it completely apart, interesting design, and am trying to put it back together without using the switch or the LED light.

I've looked everywhere and have found lots of info, some counters that of others, but what I ended up with is that...

As you are looking at the car, the bottom large pin (6 o'clock) is the green ground. Just to the left (towards front of car, 8:00) is the pin for the squarewave. On top of that (10:00) is the large pin for the white (nuetral) wire, the right of that (2:00) is the black L1 wire and down at (4:00) is the pin that you connect a 150 ohm resistor to and the other end of the resistor goes to the green wire.

Problem is, this doesn't charge the car. It's a spare EVSE I use to charge the Volt using my solar panels. So no big deal.

Any ideas what I'm doing wrong? I even tried using a diode and 330 ohm resistor, but only succeeded in simulating the car saying it was OK to send the line voltage. The car still would not use that voltage! Very finiky!!
 

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...down at (4:00) is the pin that you connect a 150 ohm resistor to and the other end of the resistor goes to the green wire.
The proximity circuit should have 2 resistors: 150 and 330 ohms in series (480 ohms total) When you press the switch to disconnect the plug it shorts out the 330 ohm resistor, so the total resistance becomes 150. The whole point of the switch is to shut off the power before the plug is pulled. If you omit the switch, there will be current flowing when the contacts separate, causing arcing.

If you're connecting the proximity to ground through 150 ohms, the car assumes you're unplugging the EVSE. You need 480 ohms (I'd just keep the switch)
 

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAE_J1772

See the section about the pilot circuit. Certain sequence of conditions must be met when plugging in the J1772 to signal ready to charge. That is achieved thru the resistor/diode network with the switch.
 

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You have to use the switch, its integral to the ESEV's design, won't pass self tests without it connected, as others have posted its also required for the proper disconnect of the AC before the plug is pulled to prevent arcing
 

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Since this EVSE unit is being used to charge from your solar panels you could "use" the proximity switch in concert with your solar panel's inverter to swtich charging on/off based on current loads. It's a simpler approach than throttling the pilot signal and telling the onboard charger to reduce it's load on the circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The proximity circuit should have 2 resistors: 150 and 330 ohms in series (480 ohms total)...
From the diagram I'm looking at, www.ecarconnectors.com/pdf/DSI-EV16P-XC.pdf , it shows the switch is normally closed which shorts the 330 ohm resistor leaving a total of 150 ohms. Pushing the switch opens the circuit, giving 480 ohms and telling the car to quite pulling amps, not the other way around. If the car were not fully charged there would be arching, but at this point, I'm not worried about it. Though I did try with both resistors when other attempts failed. It didn't work either.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAE_J1772

See the section about the pilot circuit. Certain sequence of conditions must be met when plugging in the J1772 to signal ready to charge. That is achieved thru the resistor/diode network with the switch.
This is one of the first places I started. Interesting though is that thier diagram shows the switch as normally open vs the other diagram at www.ecarconnectors.com/pdf/DSI-EV16P-XC.pdf which shows it normally closed. I have tried both versions of this wiring with no luck.

Also, checking my GOOD EVSE for resistance, it shows 150 ohms with the switch NOT activated and 480 with the switch pushed. So a single 150 ohm resistor should work.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
You have to use the switch, its integral to the ESEV's design, won't pass self tests without it connected, as others have posted its also required for the proper disconnect of the AC before the plug is pulled to prevent arcing
I have plugged in my Volt without pressing the button, but I just looked at it, and it seems when you plug it in without pushing the button, it won't matter because the hook end gets pushed up, and in effect activates the button. I have tried it using the full 480 ohms then shorted out the 330, didnt work, but I'll try again.

But, I've also had the Volt plugged in and disconnected power going into the EVSE and plugged it back in, and the car starts charging, without pushing the button...
 

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You have to use the switch, its integral to the ESEV's design, won't pass self tests without it connected, as others have posted its also required for the proper disconnect of the AC before the plug is pulled to prevent arcing
The design of the plug is that the pilot and proximity will physically disconnect first in case the switch is defective.I am not aware the J1772 specs call for detection of whether the switch or activating mechanism is defective or broken. This would still give the vehicle enough milliseconds to attempt a ramp down in charging current to prevent arcing on the line connectors. You may still get a vehicle error code when disconnecting as I am not sure if the Volt requires that it sees 150 then 480 ohms prior to disconnection on the proximity.

Just to be clear for the OP. It is the pilot that requires the various resistances (which are supplied by the vehicle) but the 150 and 330 are for the proximity and are physically built into the connector. If you want to test out your EVSE without being connected to the vehicle, you have to use the diode and resistances on the pilot circuit. Don't worry about the proximity for testing purposes (unless someone can chime in that the OEM evse does detect this).
 

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Don't worry about the proximity for testing purposes (unless someone can chime in that the OEM evse does detect this).
Thats what I said, the GM OEM 120V charger has all sorts of safety checks and self tests that have nothing to do with the open ESEV project which other keep pointing too. Since this is the stock ESEV that got the handle ripped off, the OP has to connect EVERYTHING back on, or the ESEV won't pass its self test and hence no charge
 

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Thats what I said, the GM OEM 120V charger has all sorts of safety checks and self tests that have nothing to do with the open ESEV project which other keep pointing too. Since this is the stock ESEV that got the handle ripped off, the OP has to connect EVERYTHING back on, or the ESEV won't pass its self test and hence no charge
I would have expected that the OP to notice the charger showing red or no leds if it did not pass self test.
 

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Discussion Starter #13

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Discussion Starter #14
I would have expected that the OP to notice the charger showing red or no leds if it did not pass self test.
The EVSE has all green lights, unless I swap the PROXIMITY and whats the other one called? SIGNAL wires, then I get a flashing top right light which I believe is for a ground fault?

As I look at the Volts charge plug on the car... the PROXIMITY pin is pushed into the right side, the SIGNAL wire is on the left. GROUND is of course on the bottom, and I forget where I last left the white and black wires...

It could be the EVSE may have been damaged when I broke the charge handle. Maybe something shorted out?

As of now, I have the wires re-soldered onto the pins, with the pins out of the connector, and shoved into the charge plug of the Volt, so I can swap them around if I decide I'm reading a diagram backwards. So I don't have a switch, no led, and I'm convinced all I need is a 150 ohm resistor between the PROXIMITY wire and GROUND.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thats what I said, the GM OEM 120V charger has all sorts of safety checks and self tests that have nothing to do with the open ESEV project which other keep pointing too. Since this is the stock ESEV that got the handle ripped off, the OP has to connect EVERYTHING back on, or the ESEV won't pass its self test and hence no charge
Makes sense, but there are no wiring diagrams that show how the switch and resistors were connected. When I pulled the handle apart, first the outter shell came off, then the inner shell revealed where they had stuffed all the wiring, switch resistors and diode, and injected a hard rubber goo that filled in all the air space. I tried peeling it back, but ended up with a huge mess and a hard rubber thing with wires poking out all over!

The best I can do is using my GOOD EVSE, I get 150 ohms at GROUND to PROXIMITY without the switch depressed. I may have to open the EVSE's main enclosure to continue. Did it before with an old EVSE that got water logged.

Wierd thing is if you measure the ground at the charger plug to the ground at the input ac plug, you don't get a reading! Maybe this is normal.
 

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Makes sense, but there are no wiring diagrams that show how the switch and resistors were connected. When I pulled the handle apart, first the outter shell came off, then the inner shell revealed where they had stuffed all the wiring, switch resistors and diode, and injected a hard rubber goo that filled in all the air space. I tried peeling it back, but ended up with a huge mess and a hard rubber thing with wires poking out all over!

The best I can do is using my GOOD EVSE, I get 150 ohms at GROUND to PROXIMITY without the switch depressed. I may have to open the EVSE's main enclosure to continue. Did it before with an old EVSE that got water logged.

Wierd thing is if you measure the ground at the charger plug to the ground at the input ac plug, you don't get a reading! Maybe this is normal.
You need to fix that last part first.
 

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The Ground pin as are ALL the pins are on relays, so when there is no power, nothing can cause a fault if the pins touch something. In addition there are internal to the ESEV wiring to test for loop back.

When you power up the unit, you will hear a sequence of clicks, first ground, then the proximity and light, and if all is deemed ok, the neutral and hot, each one has its own relay
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The Ground pin as are ALL the pins are on relays, so when there is no power, nothing can cause a fault if the pins touch something. In addition there are internal to the ESEV wiring to test for loop back.

When you power up the unit, you will hear a sequence of clicks, first ground, then the proximity and light, and if all is deemed ok, the neutral and hot, each one has its own relay
So that explains a few things.

Anyone have a diagram for the inside of the Volts EVSE plug? I've got to be doing something wrong. All diagrams I've looked at so far DO NOT show the diode that lights up when you push the switch. Maybe thats got something to do with it?

When I pulled apart the plug, I was able to see some of the wires in the hard rubber that was injected inside the inner plug assy. I also managed to find the 150 ohm resistor, LED and switch, but that was about it. And sadly, I've allready tossed what was left in the trash. Maybe I should have tossed it in the oven to see if I could've got it to let me see its secrets.
 

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So that explains a few things.

Anyone have a diagram for the inside of the Volts EVSE plug? I've got to be doing something wrong. All diagrams I've looked at so far DO NOT show the diode that lights up when you push the switch. Maybe thats got something to do with it?

When I pulled apart the plug, I was able to see some of the wires in the hard rubber that was injected inside the inner plug assy. I also managed to find the 150 ohm resistor, LED and switch, but that was about it. And sadly, I've allready tossed what was left in the trash. Maybe I should have tossed it in the oven to see if I could've got it to let me see its secrets.
Not sure why he hasn't mentioned it, but you may want to read through Henry's thread a bit closer:
http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?12205-The-anatomy-of-a-Volt-EVSE
 
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