GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,860 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

Iraq's Insurgency and the Threat to Oil

Americans might have forgotten about the Iraq war, but they’re about to feel it at the gas pump.


The insurgent drive poses little immediate threat to oil production or exports from OPEC's second-largest producer, which explains why oil prices haven't exploded. But Iraq's disarray, coupled with a series of stubborn crude-supply outages in Libya, Sudan, Nigeria, and ongoing sanctions on Iranian exports, portends a summer of high oil prices with potentially dire effects on the global economy.
...
The 400,000-barrel-per-day northern oil-export pipeline that snakes past Mosul on its way to Turkey has been out of commission since March because of terrorist attacks anyway, so the ISIS offensive hasn't taken any additional oil out of the export market yet.
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2014/06/11/iraqs_insurgency_and_the_threat_to_oil

Fortunately, the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant is powerless to affect the price of my daily commute...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Funny how all the fracking talk and talk of oil boom and exportation hasn't really lowered anyone's costs. I agree, electric is much more fungible and a better alternative.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,181 Posts
Short term you're isolated from the daily excursions in crude oil prices with your Volt- but pretty much every thing you purchase/consume is somehow linked to energy cost. If crude prices stay high... the price of everything eventually from home heating oil to food goes up, jobs are cut and the economy falters. Even if you didn't drive- high oil/gas prices are a bad omen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
Just another reason why we need to diversify our energy sources for everything. It is not a good idea for our transportation industry to be so dependent on one source of energy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,156 Posts
The bigger problem would be daily driving. The price of gas won't go up ONLY when you go on vacation. LOL

Just another reason why we need to diversify our energy sources for everything. It is not a good idea for our transportation industry to be so dependent on one source of energy.
+1 from me as well. I love how quiet, smooth, and responsive electric drives are, and I like avoiding the gas station shopping experience, so I'd go electric in all cases. But from an economic, environmental, and national security standpoint, the gains to be had from having transportation not be dependent on oil are enormous. Probably 3X or 4X more important than taxes, the importance of which is grossly overstated.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
4,852 Posts
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,019 Posts
Just another reason why we need to diversify our energy sources for everything. It is not a good idea for our transportation industry to be so dependent on one source of energy.
A former director of the CIA said basically the same thing.
"In Woolsey’s view, the biofuel-powered plug-in hybrid—whether using the technology strategy of the Volt or a Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid—is the holy grail of energy security."

"If anything in this world is predictable, it’s oil price shocks—given the volatility of the Middle East, given the possibility of peak oil, and given the nature of OPEC."

"No, it’s <Volt's and EVS> destroying OPEC. You want to destroy OPEC’S monopoly over oil—and the only way to destroy that is to destroy oil’s monopoly over transportation."

http://www.plugincars.com/exclusive-ex-CIA-chief-chevy-volt-saudi-arabia-106911.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,890 Posts
Funny how all the fracking talk and talk of oil boom and exportation hasn't really lowered anyone's costs. I agree, electric is much more fungible and a better alternative.
Domestic oil and gas production IS way up. But oil is a global commodity, and we still import much of it, so we still pay the global price. Unless we want to nationalize the oil companies, that's just the way it is.

Natural gas, on the other hand, since it is much more difficult and expensive (and, in some cases, illegal) to export, has seen its prices drop way down. It's down ~70% from 2008 prices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
Domestic oil and gas production IS way up. But oil is a global commodity, and we still import much of it, so we still pay the global price. Unless we want to nationalize the oil companies, that's just the way it is.

Natural gas, on the other hand, since it is much more difficult and expensive (and, in some cases, illegal) to export, has seen its prices drop way down. It's down ~70% from 2008 prices.
Correct me if I am wrong, but my understanding is similar to what you stated. No matter how much oil the US produces, the oil goes out on the global market. Oil ain't stayin here because it is produced here...it is going to a global market to be bid on... I guess
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,019 Posts
Shades of Drill, Baby, Drill. Not to turn this into a political debate, but the idea that more dometstic drilling will lower prices is something made up by politicians, often the same ones bashing the Volt and EV's while ignoring the positive iimpact EV's have on eneergy security, balance of payments, the environment, and more.

"03/01/2012 On the campaign trail, Newt Gingrich keeps insisting that if America drilled for more oil, we could return to the days of $2.50-per-gallon gasoline. Michael Conathan says this is dubious, noting that drilling has been booming since 2009, yet gas prices keep rising "Correct me if I am wrong, but my understanding is similar to what you stated. No matter how much oil the US produces, the oil goes out on the global market. Oil ain't stayin here because it is produced here...it is going to a global market to be bid on"

By and large, though, the country’s main option is the hard, boring option — the United States could try to become less dependent on oil, so that rising prices aren’t quite as difficult to cope with.[/QUOTE]

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/post/why-more-drilling-wont-lower-gas-prices/2012/03/01/gIQALNBtkR_blog.html

"March 21, 2012 But more U.S. drilling has not changed how deeply the gas pump drills into your wallet, math and history show. A statistical analysis of 36 years of monthly, inflation-adjusted gasoline prices and U.S. domestic oil production by The Associated Press shows no statistical correlation between how much oil comes out of U.S. wells and the price at the pump.

That's because oil is a global commodity and U.S. production has only a tiny influence on supply. Factors far beyond the control of a nation or a president dictate the price of gasoline.

The statistics directly contradict the title of GOP presidential candidate Newt Gingrich's 2008 book "Drill Here, Drill Now, Pay Less," as well as the campaign-trail claims from the GOP presidential candidates.

Earlier this month, GOP front-runner Mitt Romney said of his solution to higher gas prices: "I can cut through the baloney ... and just tell him, `Mr. President, open up drilling in the Gulf, open up drilling in ANWR (the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge). Open up drilling in continental shelf, drill in North Dakota, drill in Oklahoma and Texas.'"

http://www.businessweek.com/ap/2012-03/D9TL1BO00.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,520 Posts
Domestic oil and gas production IS way up. But oil is a global commodity, and we still import much of it, so we still pay the global price. Unless we want to nationalize the oil companies, that's just the way it is.
Well, the US petroleum is trapped by law and pipeline capacity, and Canadian tar is trapped by pipeline capacity, which is a big reason for the low Midwest gas prices and the WTI to Brent difference. Once Keystone north is done Canadian tar will have global pricing. If the petroleum export ban were lifted WTI would also jump in price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,520 Posts
+1 from me as well. I love how quiet, smooth, and responsive electric drives are, and I like avoiding the gas station shopping experience, so I'd go electric in all cases. But from an economic, environmental, and national security standpoint, the gains to be had from having transportation not be dependent on oil are enormous. Probably 3X or 4X more important than taxes, the importance of which is grossly overstated.
I think many people just do not understand the profound, positive global impact that electrification of personal transportation would bring. In addition to the impact through the change to transportation, simply getting to the next step of a self-sustained PEV market would imply a significant drop in battery prices and that also has significant for electricity storage and the grid.

The thought of reaching crucial tipping point within 10 years almost brings me to tears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
Dammit, we need to Keep It In The Ground!

History will look back, if our species survives long enough, to see how stupid we were to dig out poison from under ground and burn it!

We need to put everything into renewables, battery and other storage solutions, and new tech nuclear.

-Eric
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top