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“How it’s powered really isn’t the issue,” he said. “Function, form, and features are far more important.
Actually, how it's powered is the most important thing. If that weren't the case then there are plenty of sporty gas cars out there to choose from.

Frankly, I think Tesla's Model 3 pre-orders have probably had a much, much higher impact within GM than the "Jolt" web site. Customers who plunk down $1000 for a spot in line have a lot more credibility than people who go to all the trouble to post a comment on the Internet.
 

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Actually, how it's powered is the most important thing. If that weren't the case then there are plenty of sporty gas cars out there to choose from.

Frankly, I think Tesla's Model 3 pre-orders have probably had a much, much higher impact within GM than the "Jolt" web site. Customers who plunk down $1000 for a spot in line have a lot more credibility than people who go to all the trouble to post a comment on the Internet.
So your comment on "people who go to all the trouble to post a comment on the Internet" includes Elon Musk, too.
And what would you say if the "Jolt" came true? Would you buy a Chevy Jolt instead of the TM Model 3? I would, because I know GM cars since 1962, drove them since 1968, and own them since 1975. Tesla Motors is too "young" to be trused that much.
 

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So your comment on "people who go to all the trouble to post a comment on the Internet" includes Elon Musk, too.
And what would you say if the "Jolt" came true? Would you buy a Chevy Jolt instead of the TM Model 3? I would, because I know GM cars since 1962, drove them since 1968, and own them since 1975. Tesla Motors is too "young" to be trused that much.
My comment has nothing to do with whether or not the Jolt would be popular, but rather on the impact that the Jolt website had on GM management. I doubt GM would pay anywhere near as much attention to the Jolt website as it's paying to all the Tesla pre-orders.

The Jolt shows them what they could do, but the Tesla Model 3 gives them some pretty concrete evidence that there really is a significant demand for that type of car. That sure strikes me as being a lot more compelling than a bunch of people commenting on how cool the "Jolt" is.

I don't really have any comment about what Elon writes on the Internet or whether he can deliver what people are expected, but it's pretty clear there's a lot of demand for what he's selling. And to be fair he's gone a lot further toward delivering it than just building a web site.

As for whether I'd buy a Jolt or a Model 3, the answer is: "neither". I'm a pretty utilitarian guy, and the Bolt EV appeals to me a lot more than either of those two do.
 

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If GM committed to putting a DC fast charger at every dealership in the country and charging a free market fair price per kWh at those chargers to non-GM cars and a discounted price to GM products they would wipe out range anxiety even in the fly over states.

The latest numbers I have seen on Tesla Superchargers in the US is 396 sites with multiple charge points at each station and growing rapidly... Chevrolet has over 3000 dealerships in the US. This is an opportunity for Chevy dealerships that are terrified that Electric cars will bankrupt them due to the lack of required maintenance on BEV's to have another revenue stream that is BEV friendly... if you have to have DC fast charger anyway you may as well sell the vehicles that use it so you can make some $$$ from the charger right?

Keith

PS: Make the DC fast chargers at least 100 amps (preferably more) and make your cars to match.
 

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If GM committed to putting a DC fast charger at every dealership in the country and charging a free market fair price per kWh at those chargers to non-GM cars and a discounted price to GM products they would wipe out range anxiety even in the fly over states.
Yeah, I totally agree with this. And Matt Teske's comment about how this could keep GM EV owners in touch with their dealerships despite the lack of required maintenance is spot on.

But they have to site the chargers so that they're available 24x7 - a lot of these dealership chargers only seem to be available during the day.
 

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I have never seen a dealership in a fenced off area with no 24/7 access. Do they have dealerships surrounded by chain link fences and barbed wire in other parts of the country? If GM is writing the rules (and probably footing most or all of the installation bill) on all dealerships needing DC fast chargers, they can add the word "accessible" to the wording of the contract :)

Keith
 

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I have never seen a dealership in a fenced off area with no 24/7 access. Do they have dealerships surrounded by chain link fences and barbed wire in other parts of the country? If GM is writing the rules (and probably footing most or all of the installation bill) on all dealerships needing DC fast chargers, they can add the word "accessible" to the wording of the contract :)

Keith
Here in Texas at least -- most dealerships (doesn't matter what brand) have their entrances blocked off during non business hours. If it's a higher class place they have the heavy steel pipe style gates on a roller to close things off. Other places will literally just park two massive trucks blocking (easy) entry and exit to the facility. I'm assuming this is to deter a gang of thieves coming in and stealing a bunch of OEM wheels and tires off the nicer trucks/cars. (It's happened more than a few times at dealerships across texas)
 

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Here in Texas at least -- most dealerships (doesn't matter what brand) have their entrances blocked off during non business hours. If it's a higher class place they have the heavy steel pipe style gates on a roller to close things off. Other places will literally just park two massive trucks blocking (easy) entry and exit to the facility. I'm assuming this is to deter a gang of thieves coming in and stealing a bunch of OEM wheels and tires off the nicer trucks/cars. (It's happened more than a few times at dealerships across texas)
Man, those gangs need to move here... they could steel a lot of wheels :) I have never visited a dealership in a big crime riddled city I guess... when I lived in Detroit for a year I didn't go car shopping... but at fast food places the staff was separated from customers by bullet proof Lexan, and food went out via a rotating airlock setup.

Keith
 
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