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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The Voltec Charge Station requires a dedicated 20A 240v circuit, and the NEMA 6-20R is the U.S. standard outlet for such a circuit. A convenient reference chart can be found here.

I had one of these outlets installed in my garage a few years ago during an exterior remodel for occasional use with a radial arm saw. The radial arm saw motor can be configured for either 120v or 240v, but it really sings on the latter. I decided to put a cord on the Voltec unit that could plug into this outlet and secure it with a locking cover to make the installation "permanent".

To complete the install, I needed 4 major parts:
  1. The charger itself
  2. A NEMA 6-20 appliance extension cord (for 240v window air conditioners)
  3. A 3/4" Romex connector
  4. An outdoor receptacle cover that accepts a lock
And two mounting screws with washers - shown later...

The charger was ordered direct from SPX and everything else came from my local Home Depot.




All of the tools that I needed to complete the install:




The first step, of course, was to take the charger apart! Err, read the instructions. Then take the charger apart! The infamous 6 torx screws that are so much fun to put back in once the unit is mounted on the wall. I had a 1/4" socket drive torx bit that made this pretty easy.




Once the torx screws were out, the cover came off and could be completely detached by unplugging the ribbon cable:




The next step was to create a hole for the juice to get in. The unit is sealed except for the two mounting holes, so something had to be drilled. I used the 3/4" NPT opening in the bottom of the unit. A center punch and 3/4" spade bit did the trick, but I decided to remove the storage port for the charge handle after I saw how much force it was going to take to drill through the tough plastic. This is what it looked like after drilling the hole:





Then I prepared the Romex connector by removing the nut and shortening the clamp screws. If you can cut #10 bolts with a crimp tool without having to use a vise, then you are stronger than I am...




Then the Romex connector was screwed into the charger. You can see in this picture why the clamp bolts needed to be cut down - not a lot of room here:




Time for the extension cord to become a power cord. This picture gives a view of the NEMA 6-20P plug:




Cut off the receptacle end with the metal shears, carefully separated the conductors, stripped off about 1/2" worth of insulation, and gave them a good twist. The terminal block in the charger is designed to handle stranded wire, so no additional preparation is needed.




Inserted the cord through the Romex connector, attached the conductors to the terminals, secured the cord with the Romex connector, and reinstalled the charge handle port. Is your hand calibrated for 0.8Nm of turning force?




Time for the charger to be secured to the wall. I used two screws with large heads that were left over from a cabinet installation and some faucet washers. The mounting holes are large enough to take a pretty big bolt, so the washers help to keep everything centered.




I used a stud finder and placed the bottom screw between 36-48 inches off the floor as suggested by the instructions. Used my level to mark the top screw up from there and pre-drilled both. This is what the charger looked like right after mounting:




Attached the cover enough to plug in the charger and test my work. Green/green means success! Secured the cover with the 6 torx screws. There is a large foam gasket that seals the cover and there are no guides to snap into, so getting the cover lined up can be a bit tricky. This is complicated by the location of the torx screws. Use lots of light...




That's it for the charger, now on to the plug. I replaced the receptacle faceplate with the back part of the locking cover and plugged in the charger for good. In this picture, you can see the hole on the bottom right side of the cover that allows it to be locked:




Installed the receptacle cover and twisted a bit of wire through the locking hole. I'm going to print a label for it that says something like:

DO NOT UNPLUG while charger is connected to vehicle.

And that's it! Now I just need something to charge. End of April if all goes well...

 

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Wow, really nice job on the step-by-step pics! Funny, I thought you were in my toolbox as so many are exactly the same brand! Love the woodworking bench.
 

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Wow, great detailed instructions and photos!
 

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One small nit. Ya shouldn't use solder on an AC circuit. It can melt/arc and cause a loose connection.

I would have used solid wire inside EMT to a surface-mount box (replaced the existing box in the wall). Or done everything behind the wall. I don't like cords hanging around in my shop that can get snagged or damaged.

Otherwise, you're way ahead of me. I'm totally jealous of your flooring.
 

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I am very close to breaking down and ordering one of these units for a self install. The hopes of ever getting the free Blink unit any time soon seem slim.

These are just such simple devices to wire in, but free is still better than a paid-for Voltec even with a tax break. It's killing me that when I come home for a few hours, I only get 10 miles of charge before I have to head out again and not the full nut.
 

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I have personally witnessed fires caused by soldering wires in high voltage applications. The solder will relax when the connection heats up. This will raise the resistance of the connection and cause more relaxation. Once it is loose it will then arc and burn the connector. I would use a wire ferrule to keep the strands together.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
One small nit. Ya shouldn't use solder on an AC circuit. It can melt/arc and cause a loose connection.
I hear your concern. With no data on the rating of the terminal connectors, however, it also isn't safe to assume that the fine-stranded cord can simply be directly attached. A relevant paper can be found here.

FWIW, I looked for crimp-on pin adapters at a number of stores as my first option. I wasn't pleased with what I found...

I'm totally jealous of your flooring.
Thanks! The floor is a recent improvement that I am completely in love with. It's Ribtrax/Ecotrax from http://http://www.swisstrax.com/.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have personally witnessed fires caused by soldering wires in high voltage applications. The solder will relax when the connection heats up. This will raise the resistance of the connection and cause more relaxation. Once it is loose it will then arc and burn the connector. I would use a wire ferrule to keep the strands together.
I'm sure this is true, but a bit of perspective. The wires on the other side of the terminal block in question are connected to a printed circuit board using nothing but...
 

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If the connector is designed for stranded wire then it would be OK.

I still have a concern as flexible cord has a greater strand count then the wire that is connected to the PC board. This will lead to more splaying then a lower strand count wire, which could lead to a loose connection. I would still be concerned about tinning the ends of the stranded wire. It might not be a problem but if it were my house I would not take a chance.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Loboc and ctdeng0,

I am taking your feedback seriously. So much so that I found the specifications for the Molex Eurostyle® terminal block used in the charger (even found the 0.8Nm tightening torque). Those blocks are, indeed, designed to work with stranded wire. To be sure, the charger cable itself is made up of fine-strand wires for flexibility and connects to an identical terminal block.

I will re-do the end of the supply cord in my charger and I will edit my original post accordingly.

Thanks for the good advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Finally got to test and use my charger. I'm a little sad that the first Volt in my driveway wasn't my own, but very glad to have made a new friend! :)
P1000057.jpg
No problems charging and no noticeable hot spots.
 

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How has your setup worked so far???
 
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