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I ordered the TYC Cabin Air Filter from Midway Auto Supply for under $15.00 delivered via Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0041TOQ92.

The filter eliminates "nearly 100% of exhaust pollutants entering the interior of the vehicle", and "provides cleaner air by trapping airborne allergens, pollen, mold spores, and dust that aggravate respiratory problems".

The installation was quick and easier than I expected:


1. Remove the rubber glove box liner:


2. Unlatch the glove box's air filter cover:


3. You will see the cabin air filter slot cover:


4. Unlatch the cabin air filter slot cover (at the top and sides):


5. Insert the TYC 10-11 Buick LaCrosse Cabin Air Filter with the air flow direction arrow pointing downward (per manufacturers instructions). It is a tight fit; when you slide it in, push upward such that the top of the cabin air filter is flush with the inside top of the cabin air filter slot:


6. Relatch the cabin air filter slot cover, relatch the glove box's air filter cover, and reinsert the rubber glove box liner. Done.


Install_2.jpg

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Install_4.jpg

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Install_7.jpg

Here is a video of the process:

Related post: http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?7485-HVAC-Cabin-Filter
 

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James, thanks for posting this. It will soon be pollen season here. Much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Open slot. Turn on fan. Hand in slot to test flow direction.
Good suggestion. Will do, and will revise the post if needed.
 

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...The filter eliminates "nearly 100% of exhaust pollutants entering the interior of the vehicle", and "provides cleaner air by trapping airborne allergens, pollen, mold spores, and dust that aggravate respiratory problems"...
James, I use the same filter from the same source. Unfortunately, this is not a HEPA filter, nor have I found any HEPA filter that will fit the Volt.

Therefore, while most of the pollen and other "large" particles in the air are filtered out, the very small particles in diesel exhaust, that can float in the air for a long time and are thought to be the most dangerous component of diesel exhaust, can pass right through. See, for example, any of the following pages for more details of the bad news about diesel exhaust...
http://www.epa.gov/region1/eco/airtox/diesel.html
http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/dieselexhaust/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_exhaust#Particulates
http://www.statefundca.com/safety/safetymeeting/SafetyMeetingArticle.aspx?ArticleID=35
http://www.mass.gov/dep/air/diesel/healthenv.htm

GM should follow the lead of the some of the other manufacturers and provide HEPA filters in their vehicles, or at least a sufficiently large filter slot that will accommodate low impedance HEPA filters.

KNS
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Open slot. Turn on fan. Hand in slot to test flow direction.
Yes, this has been tested:

I did use a small strip of paper to note the air flow direction. ( down as noted before )
http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?7485-HVAC-Cabin-Filter&p=119185#post119185

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this is not a HEPA filter
Correct. Some of the active filters I have seen are electric (similar to this one):
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Sharp-High-Density-Plasmacluster-Ion-Generator-for-Car-Use-IG-BC2UB/203427518
 

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...Correct. Some of the active filters I have seen are electric (similar to this one):
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Sharp-High-Density-Plasmacluster-Ion-Generator-for-Car-Use-IG-BC2UB/203427518
Electrostatic "filters" such as this aren't really filters. They function by applying an electrical charge to particles in the air which then causes those particles to cling to surrounding surfaces. A byproduct of this process is the creation of small amounts of Ozone. I am not sure which is worse, the very fine particles in diesel exhaust or sitting next to an Ozone generator such as this one. I would not use such a "filter."

Unless a filter and/or its packaging carries the HEPA logo it isn't. Only HEPA filters trap very fine particles such as those in diesel exhaust. This page has some info on the HEPA specification. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HEPA That page also states that some auto manufacturers are encouraging a misperception that their cabin filters are HEPA filters. I was taken in by that claim as evidenced by the advice in my previous post in this thread that GM follow their lead.

No filter is surely better than none, but none that I have found that will fit the Volt are as good as they need to be.

KNS
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Electrostatic "filters" such as this aren't really filters.
Yeah, they don't filter well, and produce the sticky dust you mentioned.

The only two that may come close are:
The NeoAir which claims "Multi-Stage Air Filtration with UV Light, Photo-calystic, HEPA and Activated Carbon":
http://www.amazon.com/Cruiser-Automotive-Purifier-Metallic-Silver/dp/B0014JYC50/ref=sr_1_5?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1363282269

and the Philips which claims "Removes 99.9 percentage of airborne particles":
http://www.amazon.com/Philips-50987GPXM-GoPure-Automotive-Purification/dp/B0060LOZTU/ref=pd_sim_sbs_hg_1

I fear that both of these units would consume a lot of electricity. If you do try one, I would appreciate your review.

If the TYC doesn't take care of the pollen for me, I may purchase a 3M Elite Allergen furnace filter and modify it to fit the Volt's 10-inch by 8-inch filter slot.
 

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I installed the same filter 6 months ago or so and I have been very happy. Dead leaves in the fall usually hit my allergies hard, but I think it was better.

One nice side effect is that the fan noise is reduced considerably. I have also not noticed much effect on air flow as has ben mentioned in other threads.
 

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I just used a standard paper filter, and the results here in dusty Arizona are that the inside of the car stays much cleaner. I am happy.
 

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Is there a manufacturer cabin air filter in there by default? Pictures dont mention anything about removing an air filter. Seems odd that you can buy an aftermarket air filter and the manufacturer doesnt include one.
 

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Thanks for the pictures!! I had been holding off on my filter install because I was unfamiliar with how easy it is. Your pictures showed just how simple it is.
 

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That reminds me... I have to take out my 14 month old filter and see if it is dirty.
 

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I just installed an AC Delco cabin air filter in my 2013 Volt. The photos above by James McQuaid are very helpful. I would like to amplify on his instructions a bit to help other who may be a bit less mechanically inclined:

A) In Step #2, the description is to unlatch the glove box's "air filter cover." Two comments on this step: (i) it's not really the "air filter cover" at all but rather an "access panel" that you need to remove to get behind the glove box to be able to access the ventilating system including the real air filter cover which is behind the glove box; and (ii) the way to unlatch the glove box's access panel (which serves as the rear of the glove box and part of its bottom as well) is to feel the plastic loop at the top center of the rear of the glove box and pull down on that loop.

B) Step #3 is an excellent photo of what lies behind the glove box (that is, toward the firewall/front of the vehicle) with the access panel removed. But take special note of the little black triangular tabs on the right and left sides of the air filter cover.

C) Step #4: the text above correctly says to unlatch the cabin air filter cover at both the top and at the sides. The Step #4 photo shows using a screwdriver to free the top latch. To unlatch at the sides, you'll spot that the triangular tabs (which are part of the cover itself) are held in place by a flexible plastic square or rectangle with a hole in the center that grips the tip of the triangular tab. You don't need to force either side's tab to come free and you don't need to use any tool; instead, simply gently push outward on the flexible square or rectangular tab holder (that's holding the tip of the triangular tab in place) and that will easily unlatch the triangular tab without any fear of breakage at all. I recommend unlatching the sides before using the screwdriver to free the top center latch as shown in the photo above.
 

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Open slot. Turn on fan. Hand in slot to test flow direction.
I did this and I'm pretty sure in my 2013 Volt, the airflow is upward. Which would make sense since the fan is at the bottom blowing air upward and into the outlets above.

So why does the instruction still have the airflow pointing downward? This is wrong. The airflow should be upward.
 

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There are many posts on air filter placement and I think the consensus is arrows down.
 

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There are many posts on air filter placement and I think the consensus is arrows down.
That's why I'm confused. I turned the fan up high, stuck my hand in there to feel the airflow, and I'm pretty sure that the airflow is up. Just because many people say the airflow is down doesn't mean that they're right. All it takes is for one person to spread the wrong info and everybody else just listens to them.

But I'm not 100% sure because I just go by the feel of my hand. But I'm 90% sure it feels like it's blowing up. I guess I can stick a small piece of long paper in there and observe which way the air blows on it to be 100% sure. But the car is not with me now so I can't test until my wife gets home.

Can anybody independently confirm the airflow by actually checking it out for themselves? Not just by referring to what other people say in other posts?
 

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My recollection is it's down, but I'm one of the other posters. I did actually measure airflow out of the vents before and after with an anemometer and the decrease was slight. Most of the time the flow is down as the air enters the high pressure area at the base of the windsheild and comes down into the car.
 
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