GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here's what I am thinking (LT Model) to improve the looks of the Bolt:

1) White exterior with dark tint, black out all the chrome, rear de-badge, blacked chevy bowties and wheels painted black. Maybe some small spacers and/or slight lowering.

OR

Black exterior, tinted windows, rear de-badge, blacked chevy bowties but embrace all the chrome and leave the LT wheels bright silver. Spacers and lowering.

Opinions? Any other tips? I think both would look good this way. Could also black out the black one or go gray and blacked out too.

I'd love to provide a photoshop but lack the skills. Maybe I'll print a photo and take out a magic marker...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Here's a before and after hack using Gimp just to get an idea. Not sure if I like this -- not a huge fan of white/black, but my wife likes it.

Before:


After (definitely needs some spacers and maybe 1-2" drop)


Inspired by the i3 "Storm Trooper" look like this. Too bad the range wasn't better on the i3 as its looks have really grown on me, particularly enhanced like this.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,340 Posts
I think the black grilles make it look just like all the other Chevy products, and it doesn't stand out. I do like how the Volt has the aluminum look grille areas, and it looks like it's a plug-in car.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
8,680 Posts
I like the way the black on the fender turns into a character line connecting the grill and headlights and mirrors to the windows. I'm not too sure about the black wheels and the blacked out grille, but they certainly aren't horrible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,468 Posts
I'll throw in my piece before this gets locked...

Plastidip the entire thing white except for the black window trim and wheels then plastidip the wheels black...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
This should be good.
... so i'll get my opinions in quickly.

As it is, the Bolt is a good example of clean, functional design. It's never going to be a babe magnet. Nothing the OP has suggested is any more than cosmetics, except for lowering which will mostly have an adverse effect on the day to day use of the car.

Unsolicited opinion: If you want to reopen the discussion then you shouldn't make your first sentence a jab at the most knowledgeable person on this site.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,340 Posts
Nothing the OP has suggested is any more than cosmetics, except for lowering which will mostly have an adverse effect on the day to day use of the car.
Lowering tends to lower the CoD by reducing the amount of underbody turbulence. This is why the Gen1 Volt has such a big bumper skirt, and the Tesla Model S with air suspension will automatically lower at higher speeds. Now, if you were to lower it to an extreme angle and place the drive angle of the halfshafts too much out of center, there would be excessive wear on the CV joints and your camber would probably destroy the inside of your tires. I don't see air suspension being offered on the Bolt, ever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
Lowering tends to lower the CoD by reducing the amount of underbody turbulence. This is why the Gen1 Volt has such a big bumper skirt, and the Tesla Model S with air suspension will automatically lower at higher speeds. Now, if you were to lower it to an extreme angle and place the drive angle of the halfshafts too much out of center, there would be excessive wear on the CV joints and your camber would probably destroy the inside of your tires. I don't see air suspension being offered on the Bolt, ever.
I don't think we disagree on this - everything is a trade-off and I don't think lowering is worth it if all you are after is the look. I scrape my air dam every time I leave my driveway, and if the car was any lower I'd have trouble with snow as well.

BTW Tesla's automatic lowering at speed was standard on a 50s Citroen DS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Lowering tends to lower the CoD by reducing the amount of underbody turbulence. This is why the Gen1 Volt has such a big bumper skirt, and the Tesla Model S with air suspension will automatically lower at higher speeds.
Lowering a car definitely lowers Cd but the effect is very minor. Bjorn Nyland tested his Model S at 60, 80, and 100 mph at normal and low suspension settings (0.79" lower). The energy consumption savings at 100mph was only 1.7%. At 60mph, the low setting saved 0.5%. This is just one example, but he tried to make his test reasonably accurate (constant speed, round trip, etc).

Lowering a Bolt EV by 0.5-1.0" will likely have similar results. The savings will be measurable at high speeds under controlled conditions, but will not provide enough savings to change how you use the car or how much it costs to drive the car (~$2/yr).

I appreciate the 6.4" ground clearance of my Spark EV, which is high relative to other EVs. I hope the Bolt EV is similar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
I don't think we disagree on this - everything is a trade-off and I don't think lowering is worth it if all you are after is the look. I scrape my air dam every time I leave my driveway, and if the car was any lower I'd have trouble with snow as well.

BTW Tesla's automatic lowering at speed was standard on a 50s Citroen DS.
The Citroen DS (55-75) never lowered at speed. It had three selections for it's height, which were manually selected by the driver. The DS had a full under body pan with a path only for the exhaust. It's my understanding that the good aerodynamics achieved by the DS were because of this full under body pan (and the rest of the car too, of course). It was revolutionary for it's time because at the time automobile aerodynamics only took into consideration the shape of the top of the car, and didn't include the underbelly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,683 Posts
Looks good, but better if lug nuts and center cap on the wheels remain unpainted. As well as the shiny silver surround on the grille's bowtie logo. Small details that would look more pro than weekend mechanic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
The Citroen DS (55-75) never lowered at speed. It had three selections for it's height, which were manually selected by the driver. The DS had a full under body pan with a path only for the exhaust. It's my understanding that the good aerodynamics achieved by the DS were because of this full under body pan (and the rest of the car too, of course). It was revolutionary for it's time because at the time automobile aerodynamics only took into consideration the shape of the top of the car, and didn't include the underbelly.
You are right in that it was not automatic. I'm embarrassed at the slip as these cars have always been a passion of mine. My main point was that there is nothing new under the sun.

As for whether that feature was intended to reduce drag at speed, that was the wisdom of the day. Citroen certainly put a great deal of work into the shape of the bodywork - just look at it beside other cars of the era. They had variable ride height to accommodate the wide range of roads that France had at the time. A side benefit, and good party trick, was that they could tilt the car diagonally to pick up a wheel completely off the road if you had a flat. French cars in general had generous wheel travel and soft springs thanks to the poor quality of their roads. The best riding car I have ever owned was a lowly Renault 5, that could run the back roads far better than the Olds 98 I also drove at the time. It handled ruts and potholes like a Range Rover. Incidentally, like my Volt, it also had the underside well buttoned up.

Anyway, as usual, I'm veering way off topic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
You are right in that it was not automatic. I'm embarrassed at the slip as these cars have always been a passion of mine. My main point was that there is nothing new under the sun.

As for whether that feature was intended to reduce drag at speed, that was the wisdom of the day. Citroen certainly put a great deal of work into the shape of the bodywork - just look at it beside other cars of the era. They had variable ride height to accommodate the wide range of roads that France had at the time. A side benefit, and good party trick, was that they could tilt the car diagonally to pick up a wheel completely off the road if you had a flat. French cars in general had generous wheel travel and soft springs thanks to the poor quality of their roads. The best riding car I have ever owned was a lowly Renault 5, that could run the back roads far better than the Olds 98 I also drove at the time. It handled ruts and potholes like a Range Rover. Incidentally, like my Volt, it also had the underside well buttoned up.

Anyway, as usual, I'm veering way off topic.
At the risk of more veering... the only way the DS would tilt is with the jack stand that was supplied with the car. The car didn't have a normal jack (much like the Volt). To change the tire one would raise the car all the way up, then put the jack stand in the frame of the car, then release the hydraulics and the one side of the car would raise and those two tires would be hanging in the air due to the jack stand tipping the whole car. The only way it could run with three wheels, is if one removed one of rear wheels and raised the suspension all the way up, where it had no travel. Then because the rear wheels were closer together it drove like a three wheeled vehicle but not very well, since there wasn't any suspension travel.

I enjoyed many of my DS's features such as the adjustable suspension and turning headlights, though they were a lot of work compared to owning a Volt!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
At the risk of more veering... the only way the DS would tilt is with the jack stand that was supplied with the car. The car didn't have a normal jack (much like the Volt). To change the tire one would raise the car all the way up, then put the jack stand in the frame of the car, then release the hydraulics and the one side of the car would raise and those two tires would be hanging in the air due to the jack stand tipping the whole car. The only way it could run with three wheels, is if one removed one of rear wheels and raised the suspension all the way up, where it had no travel. Then because the rear wheels were closer together it drove like a three wheeled vehicle but not very well, since there wasn't any suspension travel.

I enjoyed many of my DS's features such as the adjustable suspension and turning headlights, though they were a lot of work compared to owning a Volt!
Well, to borrow a line from Packard: 'Ask the man who owns one'. I am a mere fan, and have been since the early sixties and seeing them pass our Acadian on Quebec's Hwy 20 like a bullet. Once I did see a DS Break with its wheel in the air but thought the jack stand was just there for security. Fascinating cars and a full thirty years ahead of their time.

The only person I ever knew who had one and could look after its foibles was an AME who had many years of experience with aircraft hydraulic systems. Mortal mechanics would back away in awe and horror.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Well, to borrow a line from Packard: 'Ask the man who owns one'. I am a mere fan, and have been since the early sixties and seeing them pass our Acadian on Quebec's Hwy 20 like a bullet. Once I did see a DS Break with its wheel in the air but thought the jack stand was just there for security. Fascinating cars and a full thirty years ahead of their time.

The only person I ever knew who had one and could look after its foibles was an AME who had many years of experience with aircraft hydraulic systems. Mortal mechanics would back away in awe and horror.
I always enjoy talking about them, so thanks! So many engineering feats. I initially was attracted to it's looks, but driving and owning them was equally rewarding. Snow was no big deal. I even said to my wife that the Volt is the first car that has made me not feel like wanting a Citroen again. The Volt also gives me that feeling that it's ready for anything, and it's unique enough that I don't feel liking I'm driving just another Chevy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
OK, this might be the worst photoshop of all time (self learning as I go), but I really like how this looks in Black much better!

Mods: tint, shadow chromed bolt badge and chrome trim, black bowtie and lowered slightly with spacers.

The improved stance and a little more blacked out look really makes the look come alive and look more sporty, at least to my eyes. THIS I would be happy to drive as it looks more like a hot hatch.

Before:


After: Tint, shadow chromed bolt badge and chrome trim, black bowtie and lowered slightly with spacers.



totally murdered out in black - prefer the above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,340 Posts
One thing to note: None of the wheel selections appear to be very aerodynamic. Tesla's new base wheels are good for a 3% increase in range over the regular 19" wheels. The Gen1 Volt wheels with the black filler plates are nice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
One thing to note: None of the wheel selections appear to be very aerodynamic. Tesla's new base wheels are good for a 3% increase in range over the regular 19" wheels. The Gen1 Volt wheels with the black filler plates are nice.
Thanks. Efficiency is always a plus, but one of the benefits I see wiht the Bolt is it has such good range that you don't have to be hyper concerned with it like on any other non-tesla EV. With the crap range of our Leaf, i can't imagine ever doing anything to bring it down, but I'd happily put some stickier tires on a Bolt!
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top