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This is my first winter with the Volt. I have stock all-season tires on the car. Usually, I put winter tires on my cars, but since I took over a lease and only have it until next year, I didn't get them.

I wasn't sure how it would handle in the snow, but I must say I'm highly impressed with how it handles. I've taken it out on multiple snowy days and rarely slip or lose traction even in quite slippery conditions and around hills and curves. I think the combination of the weight of the car with the battery and the smooth power delivery make a big difference overall.

Today impressed me even more. We had about 8-10 inches of snow today, and we were trying to get our cars out of our driveway without plowing or shoveling the whole driveway. We only shoveled part of it around the cars at the bottom of the driveway.

My wife's car is a Hyundai Veloster with all-season tires and I could barely get that to move around at all, with very little traction. Traction control was off.

I also turned traction control off on the Volt. I was able to get around the bottom of driveway and turn the car around with minimal problems. At the end of my driveway, there is an upward slope towards the road, and a lot of cars have trouble getting up it and out of the driveway when it's snowy/icy. I was able to get some momentum at the bottom and "plow" my way up the slope. The front spoiler pushed a lot of snow out of the way and dug a path for the car. Eventually I lost momentum, but I reversed back to the bottom and then picked up speed again to plow through a bit further forward. After about 6 or 7 tries I was able to push my way through all the snow and get the car out of the driveway and onto the road.

Really satisfied with everything this car can do!
 

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Try with traction control enabled, the Volt can selectively brake individual wheels, so if one slips it can brake the slipping wheel and force power to the non slipping wheel (basically limited slip differential effect). Not sure if it does this with traction control disabled.

It is a nearly 4000 lb FWD car, great traction. I find it does well too, not as fun as RWD though :)
 

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Try with traction control enabled, the Volt can selectively brake individual wheels, so if one slips it can brake the slipping wheel and force power to the non slipping wheel (basically limited slip differential effect). Not sure if it does this with traction control disabled.

It is a nearly 4000 lb FWD car, great traction. I find it does well too, not as fun as RWD though :)
The other day I had freezing rain and ice on top of a snow packed driveway. My attempts to drive with tradition control on left both wheels spinning very slowly and the volt seeming like it wasn't responding when I press the accelerator. But when I turned traction control off, the wheels spun like crazy and I was able to get myself out from being stuck. So I'd say keep traction control on in normal driving and turn it off if you need to try to pull yourself out of a jam.
 

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We have had four significant snows in the past 3 weeks and the Volt has done great. It is the best car I have had in the snow.
 

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The other day I had freezing rain and ice on top of a snow packed driveway. My attempts to drive with tradition control on left both wheels spinning very slowly and the volt seeming like it wasn't responding when I press the accelerator. But when I turned traction control off, the wheels spun like crazy and I was able to get myself out from being stuck. So I'd say keep traction control on in normal driving and turn it off if you need to try to pull yourself out of a jam.
Yes, if slippery enough to make both wheels spin it results in nothing happening, as sometimes you want some wheel spin. Typically, on packed snow I have had better luck with TC on than off, but I was just meaning to try it both ways :)
 

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It's a very steady car in the snow, is the way I describe it. Traction control is really good. Braking distances seem a bit longer than other cars its size.

Overall I'm very pleased with its winter handling, and more importantly, so is my wife.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Right, I tried with TC on first and then turned it off and had better results with the slippery conditions. At least people should know they can try that if they aren't having any luck when TC is on.
 

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well 2011 volts - traction control cannot be turned off....Dumb setup.

Anyway, yes, Volt is good in snow. Just remember that it is heavy and needs alot of room to stop! I almost slid into a person when I first got it, due to using Ford Fusion following distances.
 

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I've noticed the stopping distance issue too, but I blame the tires.
 

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We got the same 8-10" of snow here yesterday as the OP....
I do have winter tires on my Volt- they make a huge difference:

I was behind a Toyota with N.C. plates waiting to cross at a elevated intersection yesterday. Seeing the N.C. plates I knew he didn't have winter tires on that car so once the light turned green for us- I didn't even creep up behind him, kind of expecting him to crab and spin his tires without really moving anywhere. Well- he didn't disappoint, his front end drifted from side-to-side as he barely made it up the slight incline into the clean pavement section of the intersection. By the time he finally got moving- he was running the red light and the cars on the main road were blasting their horns at him. I crept up but never moved beyond the stop line at the intersection. But I was up next.

Well the Volt with snow tires was completely drama free compared to the tire spin-a-rama drama from the Toyota that tried to cross the same intersection just before me. Once we got the green light- (with traction control on) I gently pressed the gas- and we effortlessly made it up the incline and across the intersection without the TC light even illuminating once. I don't think it was due to the added weight of the Volt- I give credit to the winter tires.
 

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Me, too, boraski.

I recently moved from sunny Southern California to rural Massachusetts, and my 2013 had not seen more than 3 days of rain...now FEET of snow. Very impressed with the stock tires, et. al, as long as you keep attentive and drive prudently.
 

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I agree a remarkable car in the snow and I have 36,000 on the tires. Imagine it in AWD!
Hanick
Stonington CT
 

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I agree a remarkable car in the snow and I have 36,000 on the tires. Imagine it in AWD!
Hanick
Stonington CT
It wouldn't stop any better.
 

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Yes, if slippery enough to make both wheels spin it results in nothing happening, as sometimes you want some wheel spin. Typically, on packed snow I have had better luck with TC on than off, but I was just meaning to try it both ways :)
Cue elemental...
 

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Keeping the car in Low worked a lot with slowing down in the snow.
 
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