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If you own a 2nd EV/PHEV, what are the two cars you own? If you own one EV/PHEV, what would be your ideal EV/PHEV combination?

I think my dream gen2 Volt companion would be an EV convertible in the Mazda Miata price range; but nobody makes an EV convertible...
 

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Something like the Mitsubishi Outlander but with water cooling and gas only coming into play at battery depletion or on Mountain Mode in 4WD.
 

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This for me. Outlander is on my list. It would be a slam dunk if it had 40MPC.
Me three. My current second vehicle is a Nissan Pathfinder, as we need the space and towing ability. I'd settle for as low as about 25MPC if it got good MPGcs and could tow 5000lbs.
 

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I would absolutely love to see something designed with a body a lot like the older Jeep Cherokee with a "skateboard" platform underneath the body like this one. Unbolt and lift the body to have full access to the "skateboard" for repairs/mods/whatever.

You could build a hell of a lot of articulation into something like that and still have a very low center of gravity with just one long skid-plate across the bottom to protect the batteries/drive train.
 

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Currently, the Volt is my commuter car. My weekend car is my VW GTI and the wife has an Audi A3. I love the Volt for my daily commute as it allows me to use the HOV lane and I don't need to use gas (RT commute is 40 miles). But on the weekends, I still need to get into the GTI for some fun.
 

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We started out with a Mitsubishi iMiEV in May of 2012. Even with all the research, we didn't really know how practical it would be with just a 65 or 70 mile range. We thought if it would do 75% of our everyday needs, it would be practical enough to be a keeper, but we had no idea. After just a month or two, we found we needed to buy trickle chargers for our ICE cars, as they just weren't getting driven hardly at all

2 years later, when they started coming off lease, we bought a second one, more as 'insurance' should something happen to our now favorite car and we got it for about 1/3rd the new price, with only 3,900 miles on it. Sold one ICE for about enough to cover the cost of the second Mitsu

We charge them only at home, usually every 3rd or 4th day. Have never had a more practical car, as it turns out. Very easy to get into and out of, room in front or back for even a 6' 2" person, fold the back seats flat and you can slide a washer or dryer in the back and close the hatch, Carried a dozen bags of Redi-Mix home and all sorts of other construction materials too - 8' long 2 x 4's will fit inside and close the hatch. Great air conditioning, which is important down here as we use that about 8 months out of the year. I don't know of any other more versatile around town car out there than the iMiEV - We go almost everywhere in them and because we do, our other 2 cars (a '17 Volt and a '14 Ford Transit Connect) will last literally forever - Neither will have 100K on them when they are 15 years old. We have around town cars for around town trips which are much more practical than either of those two

I love the concept of the Volt - Always wanted one and was just waiting for the second gen cars with more EV range and more tech - Love the ACC and the cross traffic alert when backing out of parking places - The high speed emergency braking has already saved my bacon once. But, when compared to the Mitsu's, the forward visiblity is poor, the slope of the windshield reflects the dash up in the drivers eyes, it's just terrible to get into and out of for an older person, the rear visiblity is poor, the cargo capacity seats up and seats down is very small compared to our daily cars and that's pretty important. We probably drive the Volt 3 or 4 times on an average month, maybe racking up 200 to 300 miles per month. We'll probably own it for a long time . . . . we're not wearing it out!

Don't see any other EV's or PHEV's in our near future . . . . we're pretty well set for the next 10 years at least, probably the next 15. Older, low mileage cars are much cheaper to drive - Lower insurance costs, lower license fees. I don't see anything on the horizon which would tempt us to get rid of anything we currently have. They all have their strong points and that's what we try to use them for. A pick up truck for a daily driver still blows my mind - What were they thinking?

Don
 

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I have a Bolt for a commuter and weekend running around. Wife has a Volt for shopping and errands etc and we use that for trips. For us this is just about the perfect setup. I don't like large cars for parking and handling reasons as well as it just feels stupid to be running around with an extra ton of metal I don't need. For me the Volt/Bolt combo is perfect. I wouldn't change a thing (except I'd really like power seats and faster charging in the Volt). This is probably the first time in my life I've ever been completely content with my car situation.
 

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This is a 1 car household with my 2017 Volt. If I were to add a 2nd car based on what is currently in production (and money was no object) it would be a Model X, even though I don't like their proprietary charging system.

However since money does matter, it would be my Volt combined with a Bolt for the 2nd vehicle.
 

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We have a first-gen Honda Insight, bought new in 2001, still looks new with 90,000 miles on it. I drive the Insight to my nearby office when I bother to go in, and use it for commuting around town on errands or short trips. Sadly, My Beloved has taken over the Volt so I hardly ever get to drive it...
 

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Umm, the Tesla Roadster?

The OP was interested in a convertible in the Miata price range. I had no idea the Tesla Roadster was that cheap.

I bought a new Miata in 2001 and owned it for five years. An EV version would be awesome, although I would miss the stick shift.

At the moment if I could justify the expense, I would supplement our gen2 Volt by replacing my 2011 Cruze Eco with a Bolt EV. Then again, I would miss the stick shift.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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The OP was interested in a convertible in the Miata price range. I had no idea the Tesla Roadster was that cheap.
Also, it not currently available to purchase unless you buy a used one. One can only "reserve" one.
 

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I had no idea that you could buy the new roadster. When and where did they start making them?
Haven't. You can put down money for a reservation, though, and pay the ~$195k balance later, when Tesla gets around to making the new version of the Roadster. When that happens is, obviously, the realm of pundits and wags now. (Ten year old Roadsters from the last go-around seem to be about $60-70k typically. No Supercharger option on those either.)
 

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Haven't. You can put down money for a reservation, though, and pay the ~$195k balance later, when Tesla gets around to making the new version of the Roadster. When that happens is, obviously, the realm of pundits and wags now. (Ten year old Roadsters from the last go-around seem to be about $60-70k typically. No Supercharger option on those either.)
I thought you had to pay the full $250K upfront. They were looking for 1000 people to give them $250K upfront before they built the new roadster, has that changed?
 

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I thought you had to pay the full $250K upfront. They were looking for 1000 people to give them $250K upfront before they built the new roadster, has that changed?
I thought it was the founders edition that charged the full 250k upfront; everyone else could put down part of that for the base model.
 

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I thought you had to pay the full $250K upfront. They were looking for 1000 people to give them $250K upfront before they built the new roadster, has that changed?
It which case it's possibly a bluff. They only made like 900 of the first round and those owners already have the original not the remake.
 

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It which case it's possibly a bluff. They only made like 900 of the first round and those owners already have the original not the remake.
Tesla blurs the line between concept cars and real products. For every other car company a concept car is something to be shown at auto shows only, by the time they ship the real car it's styling has been tremendously dulled down but more importantly most of the "futuristic" but impractical features have been stripped out. Tesla is different, they eventually ship their concept cars but it takes as many years as it does for regular car companies to ship the cars that were inspired by their concepts. Tesla announces something with impractical features and then they work to ship it even if they should have dropped the feature. An example is gull wing doors. Gull wing doors look great in pictures of a car parked beside the Pacific coast highway, but they don't work. They looked futuristic when Mercedes used them in 1957, they looked futuristic when Delorean used them in the 1970s and the look futuristic on the Tesla Model X. But in all cases, including the Model X, they are nothing but trouble. No major automaker has used them since the 1957 Mercedes, and that was a very low volume car. Tesla went ahead and used them on the production Model X, although they've since learned their lesson and the Model 3 has conventional doors. In the case of the Roadster the impractical promise is a 200KWh battery and 600 miles of range. They've wisely given no ship date for the Roadster because it will require solid state batteries, which you can't buy yet, to meet the promise of a 200KW battery and 600 miles of range. If they were to build that car today the batteries would weigh about 3500lbs, making the entire car weigh somewhere in the vicinity of 3 tons. At that weight it's not going 600 miles, it's not accelerating to 60MPH in under two seconds (as they've promised), and it's not going to be as sleek and low slung as they've shown. Wait a few years until you can build solid state batteries and you can ship the Roadster as promised because the weight and volume of a 200KW battery will be the same or less as the 100KW battery in the Model S, maybe even the size of the 80KW battery in the Model 3. BTW the Roadster will be able to use solid state batteries several years before mainstream cars because they won't need very many of them, it's a very low volume car and it costs $250K so even prototype solid state batteries, at prototype costs, will be practical.
 

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I own a 2013 Volt and a 1981 Comutacar EV (which was my first car)
 
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