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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
....... In a normal auto application, a turbo adds significant power to the engine, by using the exhaust gas pressure normally "lost", to turn a blower/fan to compress cylinder air ...
I wonder if it's feasable, in a car like the volt, to have a turbo fan, that, when the ICE is running, instead of adding power back to the ICE, instead turns a smaller generator that adds the additional charge power back into the batteries, using that "free" exhaust gas pressure .... it of course wouldn't be an enormous amount of power, but the power gain a turbo gives to a normal engine seems fairly significant/measurable , & I wonder if this proposed charge capability would be as well ....
This would allow the ICE to shut off sooner & come on less often, & therefore use less gas ...... Thoughts?
 

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Turbocompounding Explained


The key product developed by Bowman to recover useful energy is a Turbogenerator. This uses gas turbine technology to convert thermal energy to mechanical power which in turn drives an electrical generator to produce electrical power.


Turbogenerator technology is used to extract power from the exhaust of a traditional reciprocating engine. The exhaust exists at high temperature and pressure and carries 35% of the energy in the fuel out to atmosphere. The Turbogenerator acts as a "bottoming cycle" for the engine in a similar way to that of a steam generator on Combined Cycle Gas Turbine plant (CCGT).


Three core technologies have been developed by Bowman to support the building of Turbogenerators to a world class standard:-

Compact, simple, low cost turbo machinery.
High speed electrical machines which are extremely efficient (98%) and small enough to couple directly to the shaft of turbo machinery.
Software controlled power electronics to manage electrical power quality. ("Power Conditioners")

Using this technology power is boosted by up to 30% and fuel economy improved by 10 to 15%.


The electrical power generated can be used to power electrical loads or to directly drive the engine crank shaft. It represents a new way to increase product performance and expand the market for reciprocating engines, particularly where loads are moving towards being electrically driven. (This is an increasing trend in cars, trucks, tractors, buses, etc)


Bowman Power, based in Southampton U.K., have a multi disciplined team with expertise in Turbomachinery, Electromagnetics, High Power Electronics, Control Electronics & Software, System Design & Packaging, Sales and Marketing.


http://www.bowmanpower.co.uk/page48.html


Here is a picture from a different company:


Yes, this does work and has been proposed for a long time. Maybe the plug-in hybrid will be the first automobile application where it makes sense. It will depend on a few things like cost, weight, complexity, etc. However, there is that 35% wasted heat energy...
 

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It would be cool to see one of these in a conversion project on a first gen volt or other ev. Version two volt anyone?



I'm guessing someone will try to slap one of these babies on for research. Don't forget that this unit would be expensive, heavy, take up space, etc. Additionally, the ICE is not supposed to run that much. That's the point. Thus, you have less "running time" to pay for the costs. Anyway, I would be interested to see the results. It might also have a cool sound from the two generators (main and turbo) crossing in frequencies as the ICE revs up and down. Perhaps some cool harmonics will be generated. Maybe this would be a problem?

Thus, don’t expect to see one on Volt 2.0. There is much research to be done.
 
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