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When there’s a non EV parked at a charging station, sometime there’s a space just across or next to the charging station, but the cord won’t reach. Is it possible to plug in some sort of extension or will the station sense this and not actuate?


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When there’s a non EV parked at a charging station, sometime there’s a space just across or next to the charging station, but the cord won’t reach. Is it possible to plug in some sort of extension or will the station sense this and not actuate?


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J1772 extension cables exist but they are expensive, unless you make your own, and would be easy to steal.
 

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What jcanoe said.

The other, larger solution to this problem is that chargers should be moved away from premium parking spots in garages and retail locations to be placed in the most inconvenient locations so that a) unaware regular gas car drivers don't unawaredly park in such spaces not realizing they're special in some way, b) so that people don't get upset with EV drivers, and c) so that the guy taking a deliberately long shopping trip to charge his car does not stop up everyone else for 3 or more hours.

I would say in 90%+ of free public charging locations, the chargers are located near the garage entrance or in the first 2-3 rows of parking in front of the store. This leads to them being occupied by gas cars more often than not, especially at busy locations. It also prompted friends of mine to ask why EV drivers require reserved parking like disabled people. The short answer is that they don't. Putting them in the back of the lot or on the top floor would both reduce any one else's desire or mistake in parking there, and would not engender such negative feelings towards EV drivers.
 

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What jcanoe said.

The other, larger solution to this problem is that chargers should be moved away from premium parking spots in garages and retail locations to be placed in the most inconvenient locations so that a) unaware regular gas car drivers don't unawaredly park in such spaces not realizing they're special in some way, b) so that people don't get upset with EV drivers, and c) so that the guy taking a deliberately long shopping trip to charge his car does not stop up everyone else for 3 or more hours.

I would say in 90%+ of free public charging locations, the chargers are located near the garage entrance or in the first 2-3 rows of parking in front of the store. This leads to them being occupied by gas cars more often than not, especially at busy locations. It also prompted friends of mine to ask why EV drivers require reserved parking like disabled people. The short answer is that they don't. Putting them in the back of the lot or on the top floor would both reduce any one else's desire or mistake in parking there, and would not engender such negative feelings towards EV drivers.
While it would be fine to locate most charging spaces like that, at least some at each site must be ADA accessible with an accessible route to the building.
 

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While it would be fine to locate most charging spaces like that, at least some at each site must be ADA accessible with an accessible route to the building.
Why? A Volt driver with ADA needs can park in the handicapped spaces. A long range BEV can also park in handicapped spaces. In neither case do they need to be charging. Charging at stores is a "perk" that is very likely to be a short lived phenomena.
 

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I would say in 90%+ of free public charging locations, the chargers are located near the garage entrance or in the first 2-3 rows of parking in front of the store. This leads to them being occupied by gas cars more often than not, especially at busy locations. It also prompted friends of mine to ask why EV drivers require reserved parking like disabled people. The short answer is that they don't. Putting them in the back of the lot or on the top floor would both reduce any one else's desire or mistake in parking there, and would not engender such negative feelings towards EV drivers.
My guess is the reason why most charging points are close to buildings or entrances is because installation costs would be much higher, if they involved running power cables out to some remote spot in a parking lot or garage.
 

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Why? A Volt driver with ADA needs can park in the handicapped spaces. A long range BEV can also park in handicapped spaces. In neither case do they need to be charging. Charging at stores is a "perk" that is very likely to be a short lived phenomena.
The same argument could be used to justify icing a charging spot. "An EV driver doesn't need to charge. They could walk..."

Some charging stations should be accessible for the same reasons that most other public amenities are required to be accessible. So that people with disabilities can use them just like non-disabled people. Also, this is considered a "best practice" in all areas and is already a legal requirement in some areas such as California. I think it is likely to become a legal requirement in more areas in the future if EVs and public charging become more mainstream. For these reasons, facilities managers are likely to design new charging facilities with accessibility in mind.

Some information from the DoE:

https://afdc.energy.gov/files/u/publication/WPCC_complyingwithADArequirements_1114.pdf
 

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The same argument could be used to justify icing a charging spot. "An EV driver doesn't need to charge. They could walk..."

Some charging stations should be accessible for the same reasons that most other public amenities are required to be accessible. So that people with disabilities can use them just like non-disabled people. Also, this is considered a "best practice" in all areas and is already a legal requirement in some areas such as California. I think it is likely to become a legal requirement in more areas in the future if EVs and public charging become more mainstream. For these reasons, facilities managers are likely to design new charging facilities with accessibility in mind.

Some information from the DoE:

https://afdc.energy.gov/files/u/publication/WPCC_complyingwithADArequirements_1114.pdf
Driving an EV is a choice. Being handicapped generally isn't. Handicapped individuals who drive and EV have made a choice to drive an EV, so they have another choice when it comes to parking - park in a handicapped spot or park in a charging spot, even if it's in the back-forty of the lot.

If a store or business doesn't provide charging spots the entire issue is moot, and I can guarantee that if this becomes a problem for a store/business they will simply remove the charging stations to avoid ADA compliance issues.

Putting EV spots close to a building is simply least cost practice. It's not "best practice" anywhere regardless of the entitlement whining that goes on.

Now, installing EV spots that are wider to support accessibility, regardless of spot location, is probably a good idea. This gives those who need the wider loading/unloading area the option to charge there even if that means they have a longer distance to go to get to the store/business.
 

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Every charge spot I know of is close to most "desirable" parking spot. If you take a minute you realize that it is also the cheapest place to install a charger. Now all of these are free (L2's not CCS) chargers. There is a push by the municipalities to be green (some of their company cars are EV's), so they want that message front and foremost. We have extensive recycling whereby garbage is separated by the home owner into kitchen recyclables (food, waxed paper, etc.), dry recyclables (cardboard, aluminum), anything with a number in a triangle except #6, non recyclables with goes to dump (in Washington State). Things like bottles, small tools, electronics and appliances are recycled at depots. Maybe it's because I'm in Canada, maybe because I'm in a lower population area (no big cities) but I've never seen a non EV in a charge station that wasn't plugged in (assuming they're working). I've never seen a car in a disabled spot that didn't have a card hanging, and the "for pregnant mothers" or "seniors" spots are almost always empty despite them being up front. For those who aren't so lucky it's a question on do you cave to the ICE or do you enforce (by towing) the rules. If you charge money for charging you can build in the extra cost of placing them farther away but if they are free (convenience charging) don't blame the merchant for putting them where it's least expensive.
 

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Now, installing EV spots that are wider to support accessibility, regardless of spot location, is probably a good idea. This gives those who need the wider loading/unloading area the option to charge there even if that means they have a longer distance to go to get to the store/business.
That would generally be enough to comply with accessibility as long as there is not an obstacle, such as a staircase, for example, between there and the building. So moving them to the basement or upper levels of a parking structure that does not have an elevator would be a problem, but lots of other situations could work.
 
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