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Discussion Starter #1
The Volt ICE It would not be traditional auto engine as it would run at a constant power. What would its weight and dimensions be? I am sure their would be other applications for its use;)

Red HHR
 

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All we know is that it will be a turbo induced, Atkinson cycle, 1-2 liter displacement, four stroke, internal cumbustion, gasoline engine.

If someone has more information than that, then it's news to me.
 

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Volt's ICE possibly found

I believe I have found the engine for the Volt.
It's a turbo charged 1.0 litre three cylinder 12 valve Ecotec direct injection engine.
It will be flex-fuel capable, and will utilize twin port technology.
With the exception of the alternator, (which the Volt won't have) this engine is a precise match as the one in the Volt's detailed pictures.

http://media.gm-powertrain.at/powertrain-media/media/images/200308200001_01.jpg

http://www.conceptcarz.com/view/highResPhoto.aspx?carID=13010&photoID=170833&eventID=0&catID=0

http://www.evworld.com/article.cfm?storyid=1161
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Cool ICE

Sure looks like the one in the pictures Guy. I do not see the turbo though. The block looks like cast iron so it could be a bit heavy. I would have guessed it would be aluminum. Of course that is not a final configuration. It must be what they had on hand. Most auto engines do not run at continuous rated load. As Mr. Lutz said he wants to run at 100 mph down the autobahn. The Volt will need a robust little engine.

Red HHR
 

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The block looks like Aluminum to me. Actually the engine looks like a shortened version of the 3.5 Vortec 5 cylinder that I have in my Colorado pickup. That might make sense since that engine started as a 6 cylinder in the Trail Blazer. It's a modular design engine and has subsequently been used as an I6 in the Trail Blazer, and I5 in the Colorado and H3 Hummer, and I4 in the Colorado. I assume it could easily be downsized to an I3 as well, and that may be what we see here.
 

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I don't have much experience with actual running aluminum-block engines, but I once owned a '72 Vega.
 

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I don't have much experience with actual running aluminum-block engines, but I once owned a '72 Vega.
The Vega was an experiment using a pure aluminum block without cylinder sleeves. GM tried to add a lot of sincone to the aluminum, machine the block and run piston rings right up against bare aluminum. It didn't work very well. The aluminum was too soft and the blocks wore out quickly. Todays aluminum blocks use a steel cylindar sleeves, so the aluminum piston is moveing against steel. Every manufacturer is using aluminum for engine blocks these days almost exclusevely. The days of the heavy cast iron engine block are gone.
 
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