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I'm about to take my 2017 Volt for a long ride using ICE pretty much exclusively. Since I've owned the car for the past 6 months I have never used ICE except for intermittent highway rides lasting just a few miles. Is there anything to concern oneself about running about 600 miles one way on the ICE in a Volt with it's tiny gas engine?
 

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Just put it in Hold mode as soon as you hit the highway to save the battery for your destination. And don't forget to stop for gas every once and a while.
 

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Not a thing. My 2017 was only a few weeks old when I took it from Mass. to Chicago and back. I left it in hold mode most of the time so I could hang on to the battery charge as long as possible, but even that isn't necessary.
 

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The engine is 101hp but when required, the car will put out 161hp on ICE by using the EV buffering. As above, use HOLD and mountains, high speeds, and headwinds will have no effect on peak power.

2 days after I picked up the 2017, we did a 500 mile roundtrip. Some of it at 85mph with 4 people uphill with luggage. It's cute to watch the Priuses run outta battery 1/2 way up a mountain and run out of power.
I think we used 38 mpg. 8,000 miles later, it still runs flawlessly.
 

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I'm about to take my 2017 Volt for a long ride using ICE pretty much exclusively. Since I've owned the car for the past 6 months I have never used ICE except for intermittent highway rides lasting just a few miles. Is there anything to concern oneself about running about 600 miles one way on the ICE in a Volt with it's tiny gas engine?
Unlike some extended range EVs, the Volt has a normal sized gas engine with enough power to easily propel the car at its top speed of 100 mph on flat ground. As others have indicated, the EV buffer makes it even more powerful for limited runs. Just hop in and drive like any gas car and it is surprisingly pleasant. At least my Gen 1 is, but the Gen 2 even more so from my understanding.
 

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Preview your route for elevation changes and any possible opportune charging sites. Other wise just enjoy the trip and be safe. The Volt will surprise you.
 

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I regularly do an 800mi run with both Volt in the past and ELR now. They are both great road cars as the large battery plants the car on the road and enhances handling.

As far as the 'tiny' engine... Since Volt has both electric motors and a gas engine it is not so tiny. It acts like a V-6 but sips gas better than most cars on the road.

Just drive. The car is more than capable.
 

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Unlike some extended range EVs, the Volt has a normal sized gas engine with enough power to easily propel the car at its top speed of 100 mph on flat ground. As others have indicated, the EV buffer makes it even more powerful for limited runs. Just hop in and drive like any gas car and it is surprisingly pleasant. At least my Gen 1 is, but the Gen 2 even more so from my understanding.
*cough* i3 REX *cough* ... I like the i3 a lot, but even hacked to Euro spec (thanks CARB), you probably don't want to plan on more than 400 miles before recharging. That little motorcycle engine can only propel the car at about 60ish MPH on its own when the battery is fully depleted ... lord help you if you are in hilly terrain.
 

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I've taken three long trips (each more than 600 miles total) in the Volt and it's perfectly fine.

You really can just drive it and forget it. You can use Mountain mode if you are worried about keeping an extra battery buffer, but unless you are truly in the mountains, don't worry about that.

If you like to play around with efficiency, I put the car in hold when I get up to speed and then if the SOC drops below the red Hold line, I'll toggle back to Normal for a few seconds to reset the Hold line so the car isn't trying to recharge the battery. Volt Stats reports ridiculously high MPGcs numbers for me using that method which are almost certainly not accurate, but I do regularly exceed the rage guess-o-meter by 80 miles or more at interstate speeds. On the interstate over a full tank of gas, I'll reset the Hold line two or three times on average over the 380 miles I'll drive on a tank. If you use this method, just remember to switch to Normal far enough out to deplete the battery before you reach your next charging opportunity.

Or just drive it and don't worry about it.
 

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There were plenty of fleet vehicles where the driver never plugged in and the Volt did fine for years...
 

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I'm about to take my 2017 Volt for a long ride using ICE pretty much exclusively. Since I've owned the car for the past 6 months I have never used ICE except for intermittent highway rides lasting just a few miles. Is there anything to concern oneself about running about 600 miles one way on the ICE in a Volt with it's tiny gas engine?
Hey! No need to give the Volt a size complex :p It's actually a 1.5L 4-cylinder... bigger than many cars out there. But it is detuned to only 100hp, which is pretty low for a car this heavy. Luckily the 160hp combined electric motors know how to make up for it.

Yes, you can just drive like a normal car. The only caveats are if you'll be in big mountains, be sure to engage Mountain mode ahead of time if you have no battery left. Now, if you want to, you can play all sorts of efficiency games, but you don't have to. My personal road-trip method is to let maybe 1-2 bars get used, then switch to Hold for all my highway miles. This saves electric miles for around town at my destination (low speed driving is pleasant on electric, less so on ICE as it can be noisy at low speeds... but it's hardly noticeable at highway speeds). It also takes the place of worrying about Mountain mode (Hold with a giant buffer like that is even better at climbing), and it gives me many electric miles in case I have an ICE issue (run out of gas or have other failure) so I can hopefully get somewhere for help if needed. If I am charging at a destination, I'll switch out of Hold when my estimated distance there matches the battery I have left... most efficient to use it up. But I often don't bother charging on road trips, unless it's very convenient. Not worth a lot of hassle to save $3 (free charging vs 1 gallon of gas). YMMV.
 

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You're not going to have an issue with your '17. Heck, there is a crop of Gen 1 Volts that were run for years and never plugged in.

I only dipped too low once into the remaining battery buffer in my Gen 1, resulting in the "Propulsion Power Reduced" message for a second. I started the car in a rest area with an empty battery, and put on toasty Comfort Mode Heat. I then engaged in low-speed parking lot maneuvers for a minute while making my way to the on-ramp (the ICE did not turn over yet). I then floored it to get to 80MPH quickly for the merge onto I-95 (to not get run over). For a split second I saw the "propulsion power reduced" on the display, as the engine had started at this point but was still "idling" for 30 seconds before providing max power.

The high-speed merge onto I-95 must have used too much of the remaining buffer for the Volt's liking. When the engine finally revved up, it whined at its highest available RPM. However, the message went away in a few moments and there were no driveability issues whatsoever.

I think it was just one off event that was interesting and fortunately not dangerous. The '17 needs even less of the remaining battery buffer, so you're unlikely to ever notice an issue. However, it wouldn't hurt to keep it in Mountain Mode just to make sure you'll never dip too far.
 

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Seems to me the Volt’s Range Extender was designed to allow the vehicle to operate with unlimited range using ICE-car refueling type stops along the way, not merely as a means of driving the car far enough to reach a recharging station after the battery was depleted.

I’ve driven my 2012 Volt twice from Oregon to Michigan and back (~4,500 mile round trip) with no problems.
 

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I've driven my 2014 coast to coast twice, three or four times to Florida and a couple of times to Saint Louis. I've never plugged in to recharge when away from home. The Volt is perfectly comfortable driving in CS mode at highway speeds for hours and hours on end. Treat your car as you would an ICE vehicle on your trip without worry. My last road trip of 10,000 miles worked out to 42.6 mpg. You should do better in your 2017. Enjoy your trip and your Volt.:)

Oh, check your fluids before the trip and inflate your tires to 42 psi.
 

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You will not be disappointed with the Volt on a long trip. It is FUN to drive. The only possible exceptions to that are 1. your passengers in the rear seat may feel cramped, and 2. if you have a ton of luggage, it might be a tight squeeze to fit it all in the back. That said, last summer my family of 3 plus one friend drove all over New England for a few days, and everyone was pretty comfortable (although both my daughter and her friend are small-sized teenagers - if they were 6 ft tall Amazons, I'm pretty sure I'd have heard some complaining).
 

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Agree with the comments so far ... when my Gen2 was six months old, i took it from Boston to Pittsburgh and back (about 1100 miles) -- almost all on HOLD mode, and was able to recharge it fully at my hotel in Pittsburgh for the ride back. Flawless ... and I averaged about 43 mpg doing 70mph most of the way. You should have no problems.
 

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I just got back from a 4,000+ mile road trip in my 2017 Volt. I was only able to charge 3 times. My average fuel economy was 39 MPG, which was lower than the 40 MPG my Cruze ECO MT used to get, but it was cheaper to operate because I could run 87 octane vs. the 91 or 93 octane the Cruze required to avoid knock retard. I used hold mode most of the way to ensure I could always accelerate back to highway speed on electric.

One thing I did notice was that if you run the batteries all the way down and then turn hold mode on the car will only "recharge" to about 6 miles of EV range even when showing two bars of battery power.

One question though - why is it that it doesn't matter which way I drive across Kansas the wind is blowing in the opposite direction. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Agree with the comments so far ... when my Gen2 was six months old, i took it from Boston to Pittsburgh and back (about 1100 miles) -- almost all on HOLD mode, and was able to recharge it fully at my hotel in Pittsburgh for the ride back. Flawless ... and I averaged about 43 mpg doing 70mph most of the way. You should have no problems.
This is exactly what I am doing. From the Cape to Pitt and back is 1260 miles. After all the responses I feel quite optimistic about the whole adventure in my 2017 Volt. Thanks to everyone for their responses to my question.
 
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