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Yes, it's decent. I think Jaguar is restricting the I-PACE to 1 C while they assess how much they can safely push the batteries. My understanding is they might eventually up the rate to about 1.1 C to 1.2 C, which would result in 100 kW to 110 kW charging. It's worth noting that both the Kona Electric and e-Niro also charge at about 1.1 C. GM is the most conservative using that similar cell chemistry (restricting to just under 1 C).

The bigger area of concern for the I-PACE is its efficiency. If Jaguar is able to address the unaccounted for losses, it should be able to match the Model X 90 in mi/hr despite the slower charging rate.
 

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Yes, it's decent. I think Jaguar is restricting the I-PACE to 1 C while they assess how much they can safely push the batteries. My understanding is they might eventually up the rate to about 1.1 C to 1.2 C, which would result in 100 kW to 110 kW charging. It's worth noting that both the Kona Electric and e-Niro also charge at about 1.1 C. GM is the most conservative using that similar cell chemistry (restricting to just under 1 C).

The bigger area of concern for the I-PACE is its efficiency. If Jaguar is able to address the unaccounted for losses, it should be able to match the Model X 90 in mi/hr despite the slower charging rate.
Right. If you convert the power to miles-per-hour, the graph looks very different.
 

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Is it "cell chemistry" or the ability of the electronics and the ability to keep them (electronics/battery) with in temperature range that determines the charge rate they can take? The Audi E Tron is at 150 Kw (nominal).
 

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Is it "cell chemistry" or the ability of the electronics and the ability to keep them (electronics/battery) with in temperature range that determines the charge rate they can take? The Audi E Tron is at 150 Kw (nominal).
My understanding is that it is due to the cell chemistry. Jeff N did an interesting dive into the cells likely used in the Bolt EV, Kona Electric, and I-PACE. If he was referencing the right cells, then it appears that they might have a manufacturer recommended limit of 1 C. The fact that Hyundai and Kia are pushing that to 1.1 C could mean that they are using slightly different chemistry or that they are okay with what would likely be faster battery degradation.

https://electricrevs.com/2018/03/09/jaguar-and-chevy-have-lg-in-common/

The Audi e-Tron is a bit of a mystery in that regard because it appears that they are using physically similar cells, but they seem to have higher energy density and (apparently) the ability to charge at 1.5 C. For reference, the Model 3 is limited to 1.6 (whether by the car or the Supercharger limitations, I'm not sure).

https://electricrevs.com/2018/04/21/audi-e-tron-vs-jaguar-i-pace-battery-pack-comparison/
 

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I am curious if the Audi will fare better than the Jaguar. Initial numbers for range look similar so I am curious how it will handle charging. I still think the Niro and Kona have the best opportunity to be the first EV many will buy but that depends on pricing and availability.
 
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