GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is the projected price for the Volt really up to $50,000 now - with "leased" batteries?

I was very excited about the $30,000 Volt, but somehow a Volt priced higher than a Corvette just doesn't seem as exciting.

I suspect buyer response to a $50,000 Volt.a.Vette will be such that GM will consider "overall buyer interest inadequate" and discontinue production. I guess this time around people would actually own the car, but it probably wouldn't run very well after GM ripped out the batteries.

I haven't taken my checkbook over to Toyota just yet, but if I do, instead of finding their sales people quaking in their tabi socks, I imagine I’ll find them sitting around sipping Sake and all having a really good laugh about this.

In the meantime, what do I do with my bumper magnet while waiting for my great, great, great grandson's next car to be electric?
(suggestions really aren't necessary)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
BusinessWeek - Lutz said over $48,000. I just rounded it off to $50,000. I believe the true value of the Volt can only be realized by putting a lot of them on the road. Otherwise the Volt is just another technology "curiosity" and won't have much impact. Maybe the REAL problem is that I'm just irritated that I won't have a Volt to play with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,085 Posts
BusinessWeek - Lutz said over $48,000. I just rounded it off to $50,000. I believe the true value of the Volt can only be realized by putting a lot of them on the road. Otherwise the Volt is just another technology "curiosity" and won't have much impact. Maybe the REAL problem is that I'm just irritated that I won't have a Volt to play with.
It depends on the performance of the vehicle. If the vehicle has excellent styling, like the Holden Coupe in another thread, and has wicked performance (no great top speed though), they could easily demand $50K for the first run of them.

Tesla Motors is working towards making a REEV in the same price range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
It depends on the performance of the vehicle. If the vehicle has excellent styling, like the Holden Coupe in another thread, and has wicked performance (no great top speed though), they could easily demand $50K for the first run of them.

Tesla Motors is working towards making a REEV in the same price range.
GM need only look back 3-4 years at their SSR roadster pickup to see what over pricing a vehicle will do. The SSR had everything going for it. Performance, styling, it was unique. It would have sold in the six figures except for one little problem. They priced it at that $50,000 range. Like Jason said, that's right at the Corvette level, and for that money, I guess I'd just buy the Vette and keep paying through the nose for gasoline.

WAKE UP GM!!!

At prices above $30K you risk loosing the whole ball game once again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Well I hope it isn't anywhere over 40, if it is I'm going have to say I'm not buying one. As much as that saddens me, I can't justify paying that much for a car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I hope this >48k for a volt is wrong because...

A cool car that is effecient would save the American car industry.
It's not going to be worth it to bring the Volt to market if it's going to sell for $48k. The only competing market then would be with the Tesla Roadster. Plus at that price I would just build my own. I am actually looking at converting a Chevy S10 pickup to electric. I will use a diesel generator to extend the range. I won't design an electric conversion without providing power. I would miss pulling G's when accelerating. I am looking at an A/C propulsion system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,085 Posts
GM need only look back 3-4 years at their SSR roadster pickup to see what over pricing a vehicle will do. The SSR had everything going for it. Performance, styling, it was unique. It would have sold in the six figures except for one little problem. They priced it at that $50,000 range. Like Jason said, that's right at the Corvette level, and for that money, I guess I'd just buy the Vette and keep paying through the nose for gasoline.

WAKE UP GM!!!

At prices above $30K you risk loosing the whole ball game once again.
The SSR wasn't a green vehicle, nor was its style suitable for a large segment of the buying public.

If you want an example of combining the best styling with green tech, you need to look no further than the Tesla Roadster and the Fister Karma - both demanding and getting $100K per vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
It won't be THE electric if it hits $45-50K, and I think GM knows this. Once they perfect the product, they'll focus on ways to reduce the costs.

Versions 2.0 will drop considerably, keep that in mind as well.


Anything close to competitors are well above $60,000 with Tesla's Whitestar and Fisker's Karma. But GM will not let us down...they cannot afford to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
The SSR wasn't a green vehicle, nor was its style suitable for a large segment of the buying public.

If you want an example of combining the best styling with green tech, you need to look no further than the Tesla Roadster and the Fister Karma - both demanding and getting $100K per vehicle.
Tesla has a few things going for it that Chevy won't have with the Volt:
  1. The Tesla is really cool looking, I doubt that GB can touch that.
  2. The Tesla is first to market.
  3. The Tesla is only being sold in geographic areas where 100K is chump change.
  4. The Tesla is and always will be an ultra-low volume production vehicle.
Chevy wants to "one up" the Prius, not compete with the Tesla. To compete with Toyota and Honda they have to price it in the range of those cars as well as make it more desirable. They already are working to make it a lot more desirable, but they can kill its chances of success if they don't stay in that same price range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,085 Posts
Tesla has a few things going for it that Chevy won't have with the Volt:
  1. The Tesla is really cool looking, I doubt that GB can touch that.
  2. The Tesla is first to market.
  3. The Tesla is only being sold in geographic areas where 100K is chump change.
  4. The Tesla is and always will be an ultra-low volume production vehicle.
Chevy wants to "one up" the Prius, not compete with the Tesla. To compete with Toyota and Honda they have to price it in the range of those cars as well as make it more desirable. They already are working to make it a lot more desirable, but they can kill its chances of success if they don't stay in that same price range.
Even though Tesla is first to market, they have yet to saturate that market, so Fisker, GM and others can scoop up a lot of underserved customers. GM is currently reaping the rewards of having designed the new Malibu well, so, given that they are betting the farm on the e-flex platform, they will follow Tesla and Fisker in fielding a stunning car. GM and Fisker will actually have an advantage over Tesla in that they have a hybrid vehicle, as opposed to a pure BEV, so until Tesla fields their Whitestar at a substantial volume, Tesla really has no lead at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Even though Tesla is first to market, they have yet to saturate that market, so Fisker, GM and others can scoop up a lot of underserved customers.

I don't know about that, I don't think that GM is, or should be, interested in the same market that Fisker and Tesla are in. I would say that those two are going toward more of a "high class" market. Everything I know of the Volt leads me to believe they want to market to the masses. They were trying to meet a $30000 price limit for a while remember. While they may have changed their strategy I sincerely hope they didn't, I'm willing to swallow 40 grand, but 50, I dunno...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
423 Posts
I don't think Tesla (maybe Fisker) even need to be in the same breathe against the Volt, they are two entirely different cars.

It's like comparing a Malibu to Corvette. One buyer wants a family sedan he can take to work...the other one wants to "Rock the Party"




...who likes to rock the party?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
We hope that this is not more than 40, if I'm going to say, there is no need to buy one. For me it hurts, I can not justify the costs that a lot of machines.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,156 Posts
BusinessWeek - Lutz said over $48,000. I just rounded it off to $50,000. I believe the true value of the Volt can only be realized by putting a lot of them on the road. Otherwise the Volt is just another technology "curiosity" and won't have much impact. Maybe the REAL problem is that I'm just irritated that I won't have a Volt to play with.
You can get a Volt with leather and rear camera assist out the door for $44K. Minus the tax rebate it's $36.5K. That's high for a lot of people but still affordable for many. No doubt we'll see less car at lower prices for Gen II.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
You can get a Volt with leather and rear camera assist out the door for $44K. Minus the tax rebate it's $36.5K. That's high for a lot of people but still affordable for many. No doubt we'll see less car at lower prices for Gen II.
Don't forget taxes. Depending on where the one lives, it makes a big difference because the rebates/credits/incentives are after-tax money. My Canadian 2012 with leather and Bose comes to 43925$ + 1450$ destination charge. Add 13% sales tax and it's up to 51274$ out the door cost. The 8230$ incentive gets applied to this price (directly at the dealer, thankfully!), so it's 43044$ out the door, tax included, after rebate. Had I added Nav, reverse camera and polished wheels, I'd be looking at close to 47K$. I still think that forcing the premium interior to have heated seats is a rip-off, because the heated seats are required in Canada to compensate for the weak heating system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,499 Posts
SSR is a ridiculous comparison.

The bottom line on the SSR is that it was a cartoonish retro novelty car. That's why they didn't sell a lot of them, nor do they continue to make it.

The Volt is in an entirely different category, instead of just some styling exercise like the SSR. The Volt has a very expensive and high value drive train, so they can't just drop the price to whatever you feel like paying.

GM need only look back 3-4 years at their SSR roadster pickup to see what over pricing a vehicle will do. The SSR had everything going for it. Performance, styling, it was unique. It would have sold in the six figures except for one little problem. They priced it at that $50,000 range. Like Jason said, that's right at the Corvette level, and for that money, I guess I'd just buy the Vette and keep paying through the nose for gasoline.

WAKE UP GM!!!

At prices above $30K you risk loosing the whole ball game once again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
Agreed, SSR was a "halo" vehicle to get people into the dealerships. Just like Sky and Solstice. 1st Volt year of was too. But moving forward at real volumes, it's a real car that will someday make a difference to our bottom line.

Pete Foss GM R&D
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top