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I only drive 5 miles a day is it best to charge overnight and get total 17 miles of charge or deplete the charge and get 37 miles of charge?
 

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I only drive 5 miles a day is it best to charge overnight and get total 17 miles of charge or deplete the charge and get 37 miles of charge?
Charge it every day. Volt manages itself. Not to worry. It's got super sophisticated charging algorithms that maintain Battery longevity.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
 

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I don’t mind charging it every day but then I only get 17 and maybe I will need 35 once in a while. I’m more concerned about which way lengthen the life of the battery
 

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I don’t mind charging it every day but then I only get 17 and maybe I will need 35 once in a while. I’m more concerned about which way lengthen the life of the battery
Charging it "fully" is only around 80% actually. GM went to a lot of effort to try to make sure it lasts past warranty so they are very protective of the battery. The battery life will not be shortened by charging it every day.
 

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I don’t mind charging it every day but then I only get 17 and maybe I will need 35 once in a while. I’m more concerned about which way lengthen the life of the battery
The range estimate will self-correct when you take a longer drive. If it's bugging you, then take a long drive and do something fun. The estimate doesn't affect the battery life.
 
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Are you perhaps remembering that NiCad batteries had a memory effect and short discharges and recharges could be problematic? If so, Li-ion cells don't have that problem. The owners manual is your best guide and that says to plug it in whenever not in use.
 

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I don’t mind charging it every day but then I only get 17 and maybe I will need 35 once in a while. I’m more concerned about which way lengthen the life of the battery
I had the same problem, this is not normal. In my case I was only getting 19 miles after a full charge. I had to take it to the dealership for a reprogramming and battery capacity relearn. Read about it here:

 

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If the battery doesn't get depleted until the mode switches to Charge Sustain (CS; when the engine turns on to extend range), over a long period, the Guess-o-meter range estimate will tend to shrink to whatever daily trip you ARE doing. But that's just the guess-o-meter guessing, how far you can ACTUALLY drive on a full charge is still however far the charge will last, not what the meter says. Aside from JuneBug's special case where something was ACTUALLY wrong, most of the time, just driving to the CS switch is enough to reset the meter again. But it's better overall for the battery to be charged whenever you can conveniently do so, and to be left plugged in so it can perform battery maintenance tasks (like keeping the temperature steady, or balancing the cell voltages) whenever you can do that.
 

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Perhaps a refresher in The Tale of Two Volts will be of benefit:


Remedial action proposed by the GM engineers:
"The GM engineers told Stingray personnel to start driving it to battery exhaustion."
 
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Always keep it plugged in when parked. The thermal battery management system takes care of the battery during hot/cold condition and keeps the battery nice and cool in the summer or warm and toasty in winter.
 

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I only drive 5 miles a day is it best to charge overnight and get total 17 miles of charge or deplete the charge and get 37 miles of charge?
Your question is very unclear. You seem to be saying that after you drive far enough to deplete the battery, you can charge the car overnight and the full charge range estimate the next morning will be around 37 ev miles, but if you only drive 5 miles the next day on that full charge and again charge it overnight, the next morning the full charge range estimate will be only 17 ev miles.

That makes no sense. When you arrived home and plugged in, the range estimate should have been reading ~32 ev miles, since you only used 5 of the estimated 37. Why would the estimate drop to only 17 miles after fully recharging?

If you are really asking if it helps battery longevity if you only recharge the battery after it is fully depleted, or is it okay to recharge daily, even if you don’t use more than 5 miles’ worth of battery that day, this question has been asked.

A recent thread discussed the charge daily vs charge when empty longevity issue. In terms of a lifetime limited to 6000 charging cycles, the choice you make seems to have little impact on Volt battery longevity.

 

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But for some strange reason NiCad batteries will work for a long time in zero gravity. :)

Cell matching and the correct charging was only a thing NASA and amateur radio satellite bothered to do right.

I used flooded cell nicad's from Air Force jet started system for years in underwater SCUBA lights.

GM did a lot of things right on the battery control system in our Volts.

----
PS the batteries were in the MARS AG0AIR take what you want box
 

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I have similar habits and my 8 year old Volt still has almost the same range that it came with(guessing 90-95%). Charge every day.
 

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Am I marching to a different drummer, or am I just contrarian?
My present work commute is 12 miles total. I can easily make three round trips from a topped-off battery without getting into ICE operation, so I do just that.
My "rationale" for NOT charging after each return to home? I use less grid electric because there's less frequent balancing and cool-down after the top-off is complete. Whatever grid power is used for those purposes does not go into driving range. I consider that post-charge electric consumption to be a sort of avoidable 'fixed' cost.
I really don't think that my using 36 of the 40+ mile range, whatever percentage of total battery is allocated to usable range, is significantly more detrimental than another with a daily 36 mile drive that charges each return to home.
 

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Am I marching to a different drummer, or am I just contrarian?
My present work commute is 12 miles total. I can easily make three round trips from a topped-off battery without getting into ICE operation, so I do just that.
My "rationale" for NOT charging after each return to home? I use less grid electric because there's less frequent balancing and cool-down after the top-off is complete. Whatever grid power is used for those purposes does not go into driving range. I consider that post-charge electric consumption to be a sort of avoidable 'fixed' cost.
I really don't think that my using 36 of the 40+ mile range, whatever percentage of total battery is allocated to usable range, is significantly more detrimental than another with a daily 36 mile drive that charges each return to home.
I don't think there's a right or wrong way to do this. But battery cool down while plugged in is so insignificant. Plus, you can keep your total range and precondition the cabin with AC or HEAT and do it much cheaper while using home electricity. When I go shopping in the summer, I even leave my car on to keep the cabin nice and cool. It uses much less energy to maintain a comfortable cabin temperature than to cool down a hot car from 120F.
 

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It actually uses more to keep it cool, than to let it heat up and cool it down again.
Not necessarily. It depends on how hot, shade (or not) condition, time, and if there are rear passengers. It takes 10+ minutes at MAX/Auto to get the cabin reasonably comfortable for the front seats. Rears take longer. 10 minutes at Eco/auto, or precondition, at the same temp will maintain a reasonably comfortable level for front and rear. This, in SoCal 110F, at high noon with no shade. It will consume about 1/2 the power to maintain the temp under these conditions than letting it heat up, then cooling. Counterintuitive, perhaps, but I've done it both ways under those conditions dozens of times. Much cooler temps and/or longer times, and you're correct.
 

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Not necessarily. It depends on how hot, shade (or not) condition, time, and if there are rear passengers. It takes 10+ minutes at MAX/Auto to get the cabin reasonably comfortable for the front seats. Rears take longer. 10 minutes at Eco/auto, or precondition, at the same temp will maintain a reasonably comfortable level for front and rear. This, in SoCal 110F, at high noon with no shade. It will consume about 1/2 the power to maintain the temp under these conditions than letting it heat up, then cooling. Counterintuitive, perhaps, but I've done it both ways under those conditions dozens of times. Much cooler temps and/or longer times, and you're correct.
Oh, I'll agree it is more comfortable, and faster. But it is not more efficient as far as energy savings.
 

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Oh, I'll agree it is more comfortable, and faster. But it is not more efficient as far as energy savings.
I agree, it's gotta be more efficient to let the car interior heat up in your absence. The heat transfer from outside to inside tapers off as the inside temperature rises. Plus, if upon your return to the car you roll down the windows while driving a short distance, much of the heat trapped will go outside in short order.
That said, I would do the same as you and have instant comfort when I get back in my car. But it's not more efficient.
 
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Leaving the car on consumes about 0.5kw (according to the car's own gauge) while trying to cool it from 120F to 74F takes 5-7kw for at least 15 minutes. If I'm leaving for a 10-15 minutes trip into the store, what is the point of turning it off so that it would heat up and spend a lot of energy cooling it down? Losing 3-4 miles of range according to the G-O-M
 
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