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Bolts DC Fast charge is ~23kw in 30 minutes for ~90 miles range, not to far behind the 23kw in 23 minutes your video shows. I'd take GM's well researched and proven technology any day over a company that has never had a production tested EV before.
 

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Bolts DC Fast charge is ~23kw in 30 minutes for ~90 miles range, not to far behind the 23kw in 23 minutes your video shows. I'd take GM's well researched and proven technology any day over a company that has never had a production tested EV before.
Well it's hard to tell. I haven't seen any video's of the Bolt EV hooked up to a high powered CCS. All the data I have seen so far have been with the Bolt EV hooked up to a 100 or 125A limited CCS station. The nominal pack voltage of the Bolt EV is 350VDC so peak charging voltage would go no higher than 400VDC.

It would be interesting to see what the Bolt EV could do connected to a 175A+ capable CCS. In theory the Bolt EV could also possibly sustain a ~60 to 70KW charge rate from ~20 to 70+% SOC. Maybe even more?

Note the Ionic added 21.17KWh of energy in 19 min 47.08 seconds at the 80% mark. Which is an average charge rate of 65.2KW from 10 to 80%.
 

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If the chemistry is similar, and I suspect it is since Hyundai is likely using the Korean version of lithium ion, you'd think the charging characteristics would be similar. GM has been very cautious though so it's possible that the charging power is lower. However, at the moment all these issues are somewhat academic. When the 150 kW CCS chargers start showing up we may see what the Bolt EV is capable of.
 

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If the chemistry is similar, and I suspect it is since Hyundai is likely using the Korean version of lithium ion, you'd think the charging characteristics would be similar. GM has been very cautious though so it's possible that the charging power is lower. However, at the moment all these issues are somewhat academic. When the 150 kW CCS chargers start showing up we may see what the Bolt EV is capable of.
I understand both the Bolt EV and IONIQ Electric have cells sourced from LG Chem, but I don't know if the chemistry is the same. Obviously the battery enclosure and thermal management systems are different.

The IONIQ appears to have a max charge rate of ~2.3C, while the Spark EV charges at ~2.5C. The Bolt EV has only been publicly demonstrated at ~0.7C on a 125A charger.
 

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So far, my experience has been that the Bolt EV will charge at a max of about 380 V, but the amperage of the stations I have used has been limited to 100 A and 125 A. It's possible that the Bolt EV could accept up to 175 A at less than 40% SOC, but it would likely step down to ~50 kW after. From ~65% SOC to 75% SOC, it appears limited to 35 kW, and it steps down again to ~25 kW from 75% SOC to 85% SOC. At close to 90% SOC, it is still charging at ~15 kW.
 
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