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Hyundai’s plan works like this: You go to the dealer’s website, find the car you want, see exactly what the dealer is asking for it, request a test drive wherever you’d like, fill out all the financing paperwork online, and only step foot in the dealership when you’re ready to pick up the keys. It’s essentially a hybrid of current dealership online sales tools and the Tesla model. Plus, if you change your mind, you’ve got three days and 300 miles to return the vehicle for a full refund. Good luck getting that from another brand (for now).

http://www.motortrend.com/news/hyundai-declares-war-on-the-traditional-car-salesman/
 

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To a large degree this is what many of us have learned to do anyway. We simply deal with emails (proof), negotiate (if needed), and simply test drive anywhere. I search far and wide. My last three cars have all been purchased out of state and have been delivered to me at a price that was "WAY BELOW" anything local.
 

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Sounds almost like what Saturn did when they were around.
 

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Sounds almost like what Saturn did when they were around.
Funny story. I sent Saturn (dealership) way back in the day...2008. I told them what I would pay in the email. Within just a few minutes I received a phone call from them. It was the owner. He was super nice, went over my offer, and said, "You do realize this is Saturn. We don't negotiate." I simply said, "Sure, but that is what I will pay." He laughed and then said, "How do you feel about ordering one? If you order one, we can meet your deal." I said "Sure" and about 6 weeks later we got our Saturn that we still drive that has been a wonderful vehicle.
 

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As I understand it, dealers are a separate, independent entity from the manufacturer and therefore have a certain amount of freedom to run their dealership as they choose. Tesla has no dealers.....you are buying direct from the manufacturer and the price is the price. The Hyundai model must be something "in between". It sounds interesting and I hope this business model spreads. My last dealership experience was ok, but the process "after" the sale was still way too long and complicated. I think we were in the office signing papers for about 2 hours.....it seemed like forever. (our salesman was not even involved....once we bought the car we were shuffled off to higher ups (which also tried to sell us other stuff we didn't want and didn't buy).
But I like the current ability to visit the service department conveniently and the fact that there are Chev dealers/service all over the place when we travel.
Tesla service is still a big question mark in our neck of the woods and where we travel.
 

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I'm not sure what's a worse experience... A kick to the nuts, wisdom teeth pulled, or buying a new car. It's a tough call but I'm going to have to say buying a new car. The thought of buying a new car makes me physically ill. That's the primary reason I keep my cars so long I suppose.
 

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My last dealership experience was ok, but the process "after" the sale was still way too long and complicated. I think we were in the office signing papers for about 2 hours.....it seemed like forever. (our salesman was not even involved....once we bought the car we were shuffled off to higher ups (which also tried to sell us other stuff we didn't want and didn't buy).
Similar to my Bolt EV experience.

When I said I wanted to read the papers I was signing, the finance guy said, "Oh, a reader." and shuffled us into another room so he could continue making sausage with the next buyer in line, lol.

I was fine with that, I read contracts whether at a doctors office, hospital, or car dealer.

I was checking a relative into a hospital and they shoved a bunch of papers at her to sign. I read them and rejected one that allowed the hospital to bring in doctors and services outside her medical plan. This is used to get around insurance limits and you are personally on the hook for the excess expense, no limit. Had a friend get socked with a $150k bill that way. Be careful what you sign, read it first.
 

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To a large degree this is what many of us have learned to do anyway. We simply deal with emails (proof), negotiate (if needed), and simply test drive anywhere. I search far and wide. My last three cars have all been purchased out of state and have been delivered to me at a price that was "WAY BELOW" anything local.
This. When you know how to play the game you can make your own rules. Good job by Hyundai making what already exists look like a new and novel idea though.
 

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Sounds almost like what Saturn did when they were around.
This isn't at all what Saturn did. They sold cars at MSRP and were set up so dealers were far enough apart they did not compete with each other within the brand. Some people who can't deal with conflict or confrontation liked this style of purchasing because the salespeople were polite. But they could afford to be polite since every single customer was getting ripped off. There's a reason Saturn isn't around anymore.
 

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This isn't at all what Saturn did. They sold cars at MSRP and were set up so dealers were far enough apart they did not compete with each other within the brand. Some people who can't deal with conflict or confrontation liked this style of purchasing because the salespeople were polite. But they could afford to be polite since every single customer was getting ripped off. There's a reason Saturn isn't around anymore.
Sounds like Tesla's model :) I would argue that the customers aren't getting ripped off if the MSRPs are set at a fair level.
 
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