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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
If you have a reservation for a new Tesla vehicle there is a quick way to tell if a VIN has been assigned, also if a motor vehicle purchase agreement (MVPA) has been created.

1) From the Tesla web site log into your Tesla account.

2) Manage your reservation

You can check for the VIN once you have provided all of the required information, completed all of the steps up to the last step - Final Payment.

3) Depending on your browser on your computer (for Firefox you use the right mouse button to View Page Source) (for Chrome the keyboard sequence is CTL + U)

4) Press CTL + F to open the search within page function

5) Enter "5YJ" (all Tesla VIN numbers currently begin with "5YJ" - without the quotes) If you find a hidden page reference to a 17 digit VIN that starts with "5YJ" then you have found your vehicle's VIN. The VIN will also appear in the MVPA if one has been created for the vehicle.

6) You can verify the VIN is for a Tesla vehicle and model on vincheck.org

As of 5/22 I have a VIN for my Model Y.

[Update: As of 5/25 there is a link to the MVPA document, a pdf file, at the bottom of the page where you manage your reservation.]
 
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Update: I arranged for touchless home delivery on Friday, June 12th. On June 11th I received phone call from the local Tesla Delivery Team stating that my Model Y had not yet arrived at the local Tesla service center so I could possibly pick up the vehicle at the service center on Sunday, June 13th or I could reschedule touchless home delivery for the following week starting Monday, June 15. On Sunday afternoon, June 14, just as I was leaving in my Volt to run an errand, I received another call from the Tesla Delivery Team. They informed me that there had been a home delivery cancellation and that if someone would be home between 4PM and 5PM that Tesla could deliver my Dual Motor AWD, Long Range Model Y (Pearl White Multicoat paint, black interior, 19" Gemini wheels Long Range, AWD.)

Later that Sunday afternoon, shortly before 4PM, Tesla delivered my Model Y. The paperwork was inside the vehicle with a pre-addressed FedEx mailing envelope. The two key cards were in a black wallet holder, since I was there to meet the delivery team they handed me the key card wallet. The Tesla Delivery Team (two individuals) were wearing masks and the driver of my Model Y was wearing a mask and gloves. I was wearing a mask.

If you follow the Tesla subs on Reddit or on some of the sites such as Tesla Motors Club you know that a lot has been written about the fit, finish and defects that have been found on new Model Y vehicles. Some customers have even refused delivery. Well, maybe I am the exception because I have found no serious issues with my Model Y.

Known Issues with my Model Y (after 1 week of ownership)

1) The panel gap around the driver's door is larger than the gap around the front passenger door. (I'm not asking Tesla to address door this gap.)

2) Initially there was a rattle that may have been coming from the rear seat; this has been reported by other buyers. I found that the lower clip holding the seat back of the center second row seat was not pressed into place. I pushed the clip into place and I will continue to listen for further rattles. Hopefully this fixed the problem.

3) There is a light scratch in the interior plastic trim of the B pillar on the right rear passenger side. Other customers have noted scratches and scrapes on this interior trim panel so maybe the panel is being scratched when the seats are installed. (I'm not asking Tesla to replace this trim panel.)

4) After almost a week I finally found tiny bad spot in the paint. It is a tiny discolored rough patch on the leading edge of the driver's door that may be a paint defect or it may have been caused by a pebble hitting the car. (I am not asking Tesla to address this, can't prove when it happened anyway.)

Now that my Model Y has arrived I have listed my 2017 Volt Premier for sale on the forum.

Take care everyone; drive safely.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Congratulations on the new Tesla.
Thanks. It has been almost two weeks, I am still only half way through reading the Model Y's 200+ page owners manual. Now that I have sold my Volt to CarMax I can concentrate on driving the Y.

Re home charging, I was planning to use the included Mobile Connector (Tesla's portable Level 2 EVSE) with the 14-50 outlet in my garage. (Tesla used to include a NEMA 14-50 plug with the Mobile Connector kit but currently only the NEMA 5-15 plug is included, additional plugs can be purchased individually for $35 US or in a plug adapter kit that includes the most popular 20 to 50 amp 120V and 240V rated plugs.

Due to the location of the power outlet in my garage, selected when I purchased a ClipperCreek LCS-20P EVSE, I planned on the charging cord being 24 or 25 feet long. The Tesla charging cable is just not long enough. Tesla claims the cable is 20 feet in length but this spec includes the plug adapter and the electronics package. I really need an additional 4 to 6 feet to be able to reach the charge port on the Model Y (driver's side, rear quarter panel above the tail light.) If I back the Model Y into my garage then the Tesla cable would reach the charge port with no problem. I am hoping that Tesla addresses this with an option for a 24 ft or 25ft charging cable. For now I am using my CC LCS-20 with the Tesla provided J1772 charging adapter. That part, included with the Mobile Connector kit that comes with the Model Y, is a substantial piece of kit. The adapter is quite solid, heavy for its size. Additional J1772 adapters are available from the Tesla Store for $95 US. I may pick up a spare to keep in the Model Y. Using the LCS-20 the Tesla charges at ~4kW and I am able to charge the Model Y's battery pack at ~5% per hour or approximately 20 hours for a full charge. This is not an issue since I have yet to fully charge the battery pack, not yet beyond 80% and I would not be starting from near the bottom of the charge range, rarely below 30% (this was the state of charge when the Model Y was delivered.)

Many an evening I sit in the Model Y while parked in my garage and explore the UI and the different features. For Driving Settings I quickly settled on Normal for the steering wheel effort, Creep instead of Hold or Roll for the Drive Mode. I like the Hold mode but when pulling into my garage I find I prefer to have the Model Y creep forward and use the brake pedal to stop the car. If I were to screw up and press too hard on the accelerator pedal while pulling the last few feet and inches into my garage I would be hitting the rear wall of my garage for sure. I feel more confident with my foot on the brake pedal as I inch forward to the preferred parking distance of 24 inches (helpfully displayed on the screen.) Even in Creep and Roll Mode if you press twice on the brake pedal when stopped at a traffic signal the Model Y will hold the vehicle without requiring that you keep your foot on the brake pedal.

When I was driving my Volt I was a heavy user of GM's OnStar data plan that enabled the WiFi hotspot in the Volt. Tesla does not currently offer a WiFI hot spot capability in their vehicles that you can connect to with your smartphone, tablet or computer. You can sign up for Tesla's LTE connectivity service for $9.99 per month, this data service provides satellite imagery for the Tesla built-in navigation app and real-time traffic awareness too. Early on Tesla chose Slacker for the Tesla standard music streaming service. Tesla's standard streaming music is also included when you purchase the connectivity service. Enough Tesla customers lobbied Tesla for a more expansive music streaming offering so that now Tesla also supports Spotify Premium if you sign up for a Spotify Premium account on the Spotify web site. I am currently enjoying a 90 day free trial of Spotify Premium, after that it costs $9.99 per month as I recall. Spotify is way better that the Tesla Slacker based music streaming so I will probably make Spotify my standard streaming service in the Tesla and at home. So I frequently explore Spotify Premium while sitting in the Model Y and I have been able to stream pretty much any music I care to hear.

Tesla vehicles come with a DashCam feature and Sentry Mode. These require a Micro SD card and a Micro SD card adapter be inserted into the USB port located in the center console. (The adjacent USB-C port is occupied by the wireless charging pad cable that can charge up to two phones at the same time.) There are two additional USB-C charging ports located in the rear console. Until recently if you wanted to used the Tesla DashCam feature and/or Sentry Mode feature you had to jump through hoops to be able to format a Micro SD memory card larger that 32 GB in FAT32 format, as MS Windows does not support FAT32 for larger memory cards. With the latest Tesla software this limitation has been overcome as Tesla now recognizes Micro SD cards that are formatted in EXFAT format. In fact all you need to do is insert the USB Micro SD card adapter with Micro SD card (128GB size is fine just make sure the Micro SD card is something like the SanDisk High Endurance card or the Samsung Pro Endurance card. Other non-Endurance Micro SD cards will become unusable in a short time due to the high number or drive writes and rewrites due to the DashCam and Sentry Mode software. There is no need to use a larger capacity Micro SD card than 128GB and no need to use an even larger SSD drive such as the Samsung T5 drive unless you want to or have a huge music collection stored on the SSD drive.) When you insert the USB Micro SD adapter into the USB port the Tesla DashCam software will ask you if you want format the card. Tesla's software now handles formatting the new Micro SD card in EXFAT format and automatically creates the needed TeslaCam folder with no fuss.

Floor Mats: The Tesla Model Y currently ships with carpeted floor mats; two for the front and one large mat for the second row. Currently there are just a few all-weather floor mats available for the Model Y. 3D MAXpider brand mats, similar to the all-weather mats that Tesla sells on the Tesla Store web site for the Model 3 are not yet available. Also, WeatherTech and HuskyLiners are not yet offering all-weather floor mats for the Model Y. I purchases molded all-weather mats for my Model Y from Tesmanian. These are similar to the HuskyLiners molded all-weather floor mats I placed in my Volt. Tesmanian also sells a liner for the bottom of the front trunk (the front trunk (frunk) on the Model Y is made of plastic, the tow hook is stored at the bottom of the frunk storage. There are no drain holes in the frunk so I don't believe Tesla planned on Model Y owner's filling the frunk with ice and cold beer as Ford has shown in their Mach E advertisements. There are two rear storage areas in the Model Y underneath removable carpeted panels. Tesmanian also sells a liner for bottom of the rear-most larger storage area. The rear storage areas are covered in the same carpet-like fabric as the rest of the hatch storage area. As far as I am aware no one currently offers a liner for the smaller rear under floor storage area. The Tesmanian front and second row all weather mats fit well and have high sides that should contain a lot of snow and ice come winter.

Front License Plate Mount - The Model Y comes with a plastic license plate mount for attaching a front plate if one is required in your state. The plastic mount is fine but it attaches with double sided tape and who knows how well it will hold up over time. Enter the aftermarket, I count at least four different front license plate brackets for the Model 3 and now the Model Y. These mounts attach to the front grill below the front bumper and depending in the specific mount are designed to be removed when not needed (for display at a car show for example) or when going through an automated car wash (Tesla recommends only using a touchless car wash.) After reading about the different license plat mounts that are available I decided to get the Livingtesla SnapPlate for my Model Y. The SnapPlate is designed so it can be quickly removed. Also, if the SnapPlate is pulled or pushed too hard as in a car wash (where you might forget the SnapPlate was still attached) or in a parking lot incident or due to vandalism the SnapPlate is designed to break away. The SnapPlate is does this to protect the plastic grill of the vehicle. Living Tesla makes spare parts available for the SnapPlate so you can purchase replacement parts if the SnapPlate get damaged, essentially sacrificing itself to prevent damaging the front grill of the Tesla.

Spare Tire - Like the Volt the Tesla Model Y does not come with spare tire or tire changing kit. Tesla sells an inflator kit for $80 US that is similar to the OE inflator kit that was included with the Volt. I have the Tesla tire inflator kit for now while I explore other options. Tesla Roadside Assistance can bring you a spare wheel with tire already mounted to get you on your way quickly. Then you can proceed to have your tire repaired or replaced or you can decide to keep the wheel and tire and Tesla will charge your credit card for the cost of the wheel and tire. I believe the Tesla wheel swap program requires you to be located within two hours of a participating Tesla Roadside Assistance provider when you call with a flat tire. One option is Modern Spare. They sell a space saver spare tire, scissor jack and lug wrench kit and even a carrying case for the spare wheel and tools. Modern Spare has space saver spares for a number of vehicles including the Tesla Model Y.

Now I just spend more time driving my Model Y.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wanted to note that Tesmanian also sells a hatch storage floor liner. At least one reviewer stated that the wished the hatch liner did not slide towards the open hatch when sliding heavy items out of the Model Y hatch area (I believe the reviewer was unloading bags of garden soil or mulch when they noted that the liner would slide backwards.)

The Model Y screen is identical to the screen in the Model 3. There are a number of tempered glass (also plastic) screen protectors that you can apply to the screen to prevent scratching the screen glass. I have ordered a Teslarati tempered glass (9H) matte finish anti-fingerprint screen protector that has not yet arrived. I liked the Teslarati screen protector, in part, because it comes with a mounting bracket that simplifies installing the screen protector. I probably did not need to purchase a screen protector but since almost all functions in the Model Y (also Model 3) require using the screen I have decided it was good insurance.
 
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As far as driving mode, until recently, I have been driving in Chill Mode (this mode provides less aggressive acceleration than the Standard Mode (aka Sport Mode as found in the Performance Model Y.) Chill mode maximizes driving efficiency. The driving dynamic and maximum acceleration in Chill Mode is fine for everyday driving (think how you would drive if your mother, children or grandchildren were in the vehicle with you.) Also, Chill Mode is indicated for driving in wet roads or winter driving conditions,

I started out using Maximum regenerative braking. Maximum Regeneration is very aggressive, I found myself being thrown against the seat belt once full regenerative braking kicked in (it takes what seems like almost a full second for regenerative braking to fully engage.) There is no way I would use Maximum regenerative braking if there were passengers in the Model Y. They would not be able to anticipate the sudden deceleration, might experience motion sickness and who wants that.

I live in a nanny county in a nanny state with speed cameras and mobile speed enforcement almost everywhere it seems. The Model Y has done a good job helping me to not accumulate any points on my driver's license due to speeding. The Tesla Long Range AWD Model Y has a top speed of 135 MPH. You can set a maximum speed limit for the vehicle between 50 MPH and 90 or 95 MPH that once activated is retained with a four digit PIN. (When you set a maximum speed limit the Model Y is automatically set to Chill Mode. Also, Auto Pilot (Tesla's radar cruise control) can only be engaged at speeds up to 90 or 95 MPH. For driving at street legal speeds in most of the US you can set a speed warning so the Model Y will chime if you exceed the absolute limit, say 85 MPH.

You can also set an offset for the posted speed limit (offset can be set from 0 MPH to 10 or so MPH (as I recall) over the posted limit. Example: If you have the speed limit offset set to 4 MPH and you are driving in a 35 MPH zone when your speed exceeds 39 MPH the Model Y will alert you with a single loud chime. If you engage the AutoPilot cruise control the Model Y will use the current posted speed limit (as detected via the built in Tesla Navigation system) plus your saved speed offset to be the starting AutoPilot speed. You can use the right thumb wheel control on the steering wheel to raise or lower the AutoPilot speed in 1 MPH or 5 MPH increments. If you raise the speed beyond the posted speed limit plus any offset you have set the Model Y will sound a single loud chime. If you engage AutoPilot in a 35 MPH zone and then down the road enter a 45 MPH zone I do not believe that the Model Y will reset the AutoPilot to the new speed limit (I really need to test this as I frequently use the AutoPilot feature when driving local roads at speeds between 30 MPH and 45 MPH.) If you are driving with AutoPilot engaged at 35 MPH and then enter a zone with a 30 MPH speed limit the Model Y will detect that your driving in excess of the new speed limit of 30 MPH plus any offset that you had set and sound a single loud chime. You can lower the set speed using the right thumb wheel control on the steering wheel.

Sometimes the local speed limit information available to the Model Y's navigation system is wrong or is not up to date but most of the time when I am driving and the Model Y sounds the speed warning chime it is i because I have entered a reduced speed zone (i.e. this can be a temporary construction zone or a newly created reduced speed zone.) So if you heed the warning chime and slow down eventually this will save getting a speeding ticket.

Autosteer - Autosteer is currently included with Tesla AutoPilot and when activated will attempt to keep the Model Y centered in the driving lane if the Model Y can detect lane markings. I have not spent any time using AutoSteer.

Full Self Driving (FSD) is the advanced version of Tesla AutoPilot - FSD currently costs an additional $7,000 US (starting in July 2020 the price of FSD will increase to $8,000 US.) FSD includes summon (the vehicle will back itself out of a garage or parking space) and advanced summon (the vehicle will attempt to back out of a parking space in a parking lot and self-navigate to where you are waiting (say under a covered portico while it is raining). Also, FSD includes Navigate on AutoPilot where once you set a route using the Tesla Navigation System the FSD system will navigate the vehicle from the highway on ramp to the highway off ramp.

If Auto Pilot is engaged and the vehicle has FSD the vehicle can automatically change lanes, pass slow vehicles, return to the center driving lane without requiring driver intervention. With the standard AutoPilot, without FSD, to navigate around slower traffic, you need to disengage the Auto Pilot, manually change lanes and pass the slower moving vehicle. Once you return to the center driving lane you can then re-engage the AutoPilot.

This is not to suggest that FSD is a gimmick or that FSD is not useful in certain situations but taking that $7,000 or $8,000 and investing the money in Tesla stock is probably a wiser choice than purchasing FSD at this time. In the future Tesla is considering offering FSD on a subscription basis. This would be a good solution if you were taking a cross country trip; purchase 30 days of FSD while on your road trip.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Wheels and Tires

You have to dig around to learn the different wheel and tire offerings on the Model Y.

On the Long Range AWD Model Y the standard wheel offering is the 19" Gemini wheel that comes with the Gemini wheel cover. (This is an updated version of the Aero-type wheel cover that is standard on the Model 3 with the 18" wheels.)

The wheel size as printed on the label affixed to the driver's door B pillar of my Model Y Longe Range AWD for both Front and Rear tires is Tire Size: 255/45R19. Tire Pressure is stated as 290kPa / 42 PSI for all four tires.

At the present time, the only way you can get the Model Y fitted with All-Season Radial tires from the factory is to order the 19" Gemini wheels. The OE tires on my Model Y are Continental - ProContact RX all season radial tires.

The Optional wheels that can be ordered from Tesla for the Long Range AWD are 20" Induction wheels (these do not come with the aero-type plastic wheel cover. The tires that come with the 20" Induction wheels are summer sport (performance) tires.

If you order a Performance Model Y you can select either the 19" Gemini wheels or the 20" Induction wheels. If you also specify that you want the Performance Upgrade Package (PuP) for your Performance Model Y at time of order you will receive the 21" Überturbine wheels fitted with summer sport (performance) tires.

At this time he only way to order a Model Y fitted with All Season tires from the factory is to order the 19" Gemini Wheels.

As for efficiency, I read one article that included a graph that showed that you will loose 6% in efficiency when you go from 19" wheels to 20" wheels and an additional 6% when you go from 20" wheels to 21" wheels.
 

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Nice job on most of your descriptions and efforts.

Creep instead of Hold or Roll for the Drive Mode. I like the Hold mode but when pulling into my garage I find I prefer to have the Model Y creep forward and use the brake pedal to stop the car. If I were to screw up and press too hard on the accelerator pedal while pulling the last few feet and inches into my garage I would be hitting the rear wall of my garage for sure. I feel more confident with my foot on the brake pedal as I inch forward to the preferred parking distance of 24 inches (helpfully displayed on the screen.) Even in Creep and Roll Mode if you press twice on the brake pedal when stopped at a traffic signal the Model Y will hold the vehicle without requiring that you keep your foot on the brake pedal.
I also use creep mode instead of hold. Works perfectly for 'creeping' like an automatic transmission. I don't have the other full stop Roll mode on X because I have two induction motors.

I don't think I press twice on my brake for (H)old at stoplights (when I'm 1st) but I just press harder and it engages. Perhaps it works both ways.

Re: hitting garage wall
Make sure you have "Obstacle Aware Acceleration" turned on. This was an OTA feature that came a few years back. When it detects objects/walls it will limit the accel ramp up so you have more time to react. This google YT search will find the NowYouKnow video on it. "Obstacle Aware Acceleration" - YouTube

Other non-Endurance Micro SD cards will become unusable in a short time due to the high number or drive writes and rewrites due to the DashCam and Sentry Mode software. There is no need to use a larger capacity Micro SD card than 128GB and no need to use an even larger SSD drive such as the Samsung T5 drive unless you want to or have a huge music collection stored on the SSD drive.)
Sentry Mode will write automatically when there are events.
Normal TeslaCam (DashCam) usage does not do high number of writes to the SD card like a typical DashCam. (My BlackVue constantly writes). It will if you have record on honk option enabled or if you press the icon (ie. last 10 minutes IIRC) or in the case of an accident.
I use a large capacity SD card because of "wear leveling" ("wear leveling" - Google Search). I definitely use a high endurance card as well. ie. made for security cams, digital camera, etc. Mine handles a wide range of temperatures. I definitely want a reliable SD card when I need it most (accident!).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Scott. I am pretty sure I have obstacle aware acceleration turned on but will check. There is a photo circulating the internet of a Model 3 that is half buried in a brick and block wall. The photo might have been photoshopped.
 

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With the latest Tesla software it is very easy to get the DashCam and Sentry mode working, no need to download third-party apps on a MS Windows PC just to be able to format a Micro SD card that happens to be larger than 32GB in FAT32 format. The latest Tesla software can format the Micro SD card using EXFAT format so no need to use FAT32.
 

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Thanks Scott. I am pretty sure I have obstacle aware acceleration turned on but will check. There is a photo circulating the internet of a Model 3 that is half buried in a brick and block wall. The photo might have been photoshopped.
"Obstacle Aware Acceleration" gives you more time because is slows the pedal response. You certainly can hit a wall if you don't take your foot off the pedal OR think you have moved to the brake and you push the accelerator pedal to the floor. There have been several of these and all of the logs have showed the driver pushed the pedal to the floor vs brake ... despite their claims or memories of the situation.
 

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With the latest Tesla software it is very easy to get the DashCam and Sentry mode working, no need to download third-party apps on a MS Windows PC just to be able to format a Micro SD card that happens to be larger than 32GB in FAT32 format. The latest Tesla software can format the Micro SD card using EXFAT format so no need to use FAT32.
From the manual there are other supported formats too.
170694

170695
 

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Something I read in the Model Y owner's manual regarding never parking on a slope when the road or driveway is covered in snow or ice has made me think about the Detroit automobiles from the 60s and early 70s. These were almost always RWD. Was there an issue with parking these vehicles on an incline with snow or ice covered roads? The Model 3 and Model Y are only held in place by the parking brake being applied to the rear wheels. I have seen video of a Model 3 that broke free and slid down an inclined driveway shortly after the passengers exited the vehicle. (No one was injured but the Model 3 crashed into several parked cars.) When I learned to drive we were taught to always turn the steering wheel towards the curb if parked on the downhill slope or towards the street if parked on the uphill slope. I never recall any caution regarding cars just breaking from at the rear wheels and sliding down snow and ice covered roads. Clearly there is a gap in my driver training.
 
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I received my permanent license plates today from the Maryland Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Administration for my Model Y. I considered getting a custom plate for my Y but in the end decided against this.

In the Tesla UI you can name your vehicle. You can later decide to change the name of the vehicle. I'm not sure if the vehicle name shows up on any of Tesla's vehicle reports but if it does then they will see a Model Y named "Y-a-Duck"

(If you are old enough to remember the Marx Brothers, their films, or at least the best remembered Marx Brothers comedy routines then you may get the reference to a classic scene in the 1929 film, The Coconuts, with Groucho Marx (as Mr. Hammer) and Chico Marx (as Chico, Groucho's hired hand.) Groucho is attempting to show Chico the master plan for a new Florida real estate development called Coconut Grove, every time Groucho points to the place on the plan where the planned road, Coconut Drive, crosses a canal he explains that you come to a viaduct, Chico interrupts and asks innocently, "Why a duck?" The two brothers get stuck on why a duck for what seems like foreever. Anyway, I bet I have the only Model Y named after a Marx Brothers comedy bit from almost a century ago.

If it does not violate forum rules, if you end up planning to order a Model Y or any Tesla vehicle feel free to use my referral code (you can ask me privately.) We will each earn 1,000 free SuperCharger miles and a chance to win a Tesla Roadster. Who knows, some free SuperCharging might even inspire me to hit the open road in my Model Y.
 

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Jcanoe, thanks for this excellent writeup and sharing of your new ownership experiences, very helpful. I've followed Tesla for years (wish I had bought the stock when I first started following them, hindsight is 20/20). Do you find the Model Y too big of a car at all, parking spots, etc. especially coming from a Volt? The Volt has spoiled me on a hatch, so the Y is more appealing than a 3 from a usability/cargo perspective. I'm just not a fan of larger cars and have yet to see a Y in person. I also like the Apple Carplay that the Volt has, really like that. I know Tesla has a nice nav system, it's just nice how CP works and I'm a Waze fan.

Also thanks to Scott for his always there info sharing on all things, including Tesla. He was an earlier adopter and excellent with sharing his knowledge. It's appreciated!
 

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My 2017 Volt dimensions were 180 inches long X 71 inches wide X 56 inches high. The Tesla Model Y exterior dimensions are 187 inches long X 76 inches wide X 64 inches high

Compared to the Gen2 Volt the Model Y is 7 inches longer, 5 inches wider and 8 inches taller. I have to pay attention to the right side and right side mirror as I pull the Model Y into my garage, the Model Y will alert the driver when the vehicle is close to a stationary object. I have some trepidation about taking the Model Y to the ATM drive through lane at my local back as always thought the Volt was a tight fit in this narrow lane bounded by steel posts to protect the ATM machine. One feature I do miss, so far, is the radar enabled blind spot warning with cross traffic alert that was included with the DC package in my 2017 Volt Premier. Tesla currently uses the side repeater cameras to provide blind spot warning but Tesla does not currently offer cross-traffic alert radar. In the software release that Tesla is currently rolling out to the Tesla fleet through regular over-the-air updates the driver can elect to view the two rear side repeater cameras when engaging the backup camera. This may help when backing out of a parking space but will not be as effective as the radar-enabled cross traffic alert in the Volt.

To enter my 2017 Volt I had to sit down in the seat with my legs outside the Volt, then swing my legs into the Volt to get into the driver's seat. In the Model Y the seat is positioned much higher, no need to crouch or bend in a way that puts any additional stress on my knees or other joints.

Tesla's navigation system is currently driven by Google with optional satellite imagery if you have the LTE connectivity subscription. I have not tried the following with Waze on my iPhone but I can look up an address on my iPhone using either Apple Maps or Google Maps and then share the destination with the Tesla phone app. As soon as you enter the Tesla vehicle the Tesla phone app relays any recent destinations to the Tesla Navigation system. Then you can use the Tesla Navigation to navigate to the destination. You can also look up destinations directly via the Tesla Navigation software, sometimes the phone app (Apple Maps or Google Maps) can locate a business that does not come up in the Tesla navigation.
 
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Tesla's navigation system is currently driven by Google with optional satellite imagery if you have the LTE connectivity subscription.
The map display is google but the behind the scenes navigation and other things are not. See some info I've gathered in the past:
Tesla has gone through several sources. Originally they used Navigon for map data. They displayed (and still do) a Google Maps overlay in the center console of the Model S and Model X. But the cars need to have local map data in order for navigation to work when there’s no data connection.
The most recent Tesla navigation system is proprietary, and reportedly was built using open source software from Mapbox and Valhalla [via OpenStreetMap]. The overlay map is still from Google, and especially on cars with just one screen, it gives the impression to some people that the navigation is from Google. But it never was.
 

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170+ Tesla voice commands:
(crowd sourced based on many variations of statements; manual only mentions a few; most assume that when the driver use the voice command and it does not work then that request is tracked and based on popularity then added later -- clever me thinks but I think the voice commands are not hardcoded/fixed and that some sort of AI is being used to interpret/translate the meaning).
 

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Tesla's navigation system is currently driven by Google with optional satellite imagery if you have the LTE connectivity subscription. I have not tried the following with Waze on my iPhone but I can look up an address on my iPhone using either Apple Maps or Google Maps and then share the destination with the Tesla phone app. As soon as you enter the Tesla vehicle the Tesla phone app relays any recent destinations to the Tesla Navigation system. Then you can use the Tesla Navigation to navigate to the destination. You can also look up destinations directly via the Tesla Navigation software, sometimes the phone app (Apple Maps or Google Maps) can locate a business that does not come up in the Tesla navigation.
I have very good luck with voice control for navigation. You can name a store or restaurant or a category of restaurants or ice cream, etc.
Sometimes I also add on the end "...in [city name]". Why? Because if there are several in the area it may give a list ... if you narrow it down then it just automatically puts it in the navigation route.
I use voice commands a fair amount.

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