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I had leased a 2014 Volt. I returned it in August, and I received a letter from Ally that the car sold at auction. They did not disclose the price paid at auction.

I'm curious how much that car went for. I tried searching Google by the car's VIN and license plate number and found nothing.

How can I find out how much it sold for?
 

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I had leased a 2014 Volt. I returned it in August, and I received a letter from Ally that the car sold at auction. They did not disclose the price paid at auction.

I'm curious how much that car went for. I tried searching Google by the car's VIN and license plate number and found nothing.

How can I find out how much it sold for?
Hi ....as of this week the average paid by dealers thru Mannheim Auction Group nationwide is $12,950 with 34k miles with a condition report rated at "4". The range is $11950 to $14000 and is related to condition and equipment variables.
Hope this helps :)
 

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You may not be able to find an exactly price paid, but perhaps taking 15-25% off the asking price could get you into the ballpark on what they paid if you can find it listed on a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi ....as of this week the average paid by dealers thru Mannheim Auction Group nationwide is $12,950 with 34k miles with a condition report rated at "4". The range is $11950 to $14000 and is related to condition and equipment variables.
Hope this helps :)
Mine only had 22k miles. The buyout price offered by Ally was $16,800 which was a $4.5k reduction from the residual value. They were not open to any offers for less than that.

You may not be able to find an exactly price paid, but perhaps taking 15-25% off the asking price could get you into the ballpark on what they paid if you can find it listed on a lot.
I would expect a Google search on the VIN would bring it up if it's listed somewhere for sale, right? How would you go about finding which sales lot the car is on?

FWIW, I'm asking in case there's a good deal on the car to be had. Obviously I know the car's history, so it's not like a typical used car transaction where there is uncertainty about vehicle history.
 

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Mine only had 22k miles. The buyout price offered by Ally was $16,800 which was a $4.5k reduction from the residual value. They were not open to any offers for less than that.



I would expect a Google search on the VIN would bring it up if it's listed somewhere for sale, right? How would you go about finding which sales lot the car is on?

FWIW, I'm asking in case there's a good deal on the car to be had. Obviously I know the car's history, so it's not like a typical used car transaction where there is uncertainty about vehicle history.
Hi...IF you do a search on Cargurus.com (near you) you will likely find prices run $12k's through the 16k's as I did. So the Auction prices i posted would correspond to the appropriate values with the variables dependent upon miles and equipment.
 

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A VIN search should almost certainly come up with a hit from a dealer lot provided it's listed. Just pop the VIN in on google and see what comes up. Most dealerships do put the VIN on their vehicles sale page which google should automatically pick up on and show you the sale page for whatever dealership may have bought it at auction. cargurus might be your best option if they offer a VIN search outside of google.

I did a google search on a car I sold to Carmax earlier this year and came up with the dealership that has it for sale. Knowing what carmax paid, and what the offer price is (not carmax, but a specialty dealer acquired it from carmax after I sold it) was a disgusting feeling since the asking was double what carmax gave however knowing what work the vehicle needs, it's WAY overpriced and doesn't surprise me that 6 months later it's still on offer.
 

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A VIN search should almost certainly come up with a hit from a dealer lot provided it's listed. Just pop the VIN in on google and see what comes up. Most dealerships do put the VIN on their vehicles sale page which google should automatically pick up on and show you the sale page for whatever dealership may have bought it at auction. cargurus might be your best option if they offer a VIN search outside of google.

I did a google search on a car I sold to Carmax earlier this year and came up with the dealership that has it for sale. Knowing what carmax paid, and what the offer price is (not carmax, but a specialty dealer acquired it from carmax after I sold it) was a disgusting feeling since the asking was double what carmax gave however knowing what work the vehicle needs, it's WAY overpriced and doesn't surprise me that 6 months later it's still on offer.
That is why you advertise and sell it yourself and pick up the difference :)
 

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That is why you advertise and sell it yourself and pick up the difference :)
Well, for what it's worth, the car (2002 Lotus Esprit 25th anniversary #80) was unofficially for sale for 3 years. Not really advertised, but offers were extended to those who asked about it. Asking price was $40K but I was willing to work on that. Price sold to Carmax was $28K and it's been found for sale with Private Collection Motors for $59.888 which is at the very extreme high retail end. Knowing what work the car needs (minimum 10K) to bring it to almost perfect condition, its just not worth what they're asking, in particular with the "higher" mileage of 38K. Overall I had the car since 2008 and aside from a few extra repairs, all maintenance was done according to factory schedule and the car was rock solid in reliability. Not at all the troublesome vehicle people make Lotus to be. In 8 years it never had a breakdown or left me stranded. I do miss the car, but it was getting to a point that my body and the driving position required just weren't in agreement anymore so I felt it was time to pass the baton to someone else who could not only appreciate it aesthetically, but also for the unique characteristics of such a rare piece of machinery.

But keeping in context with the original message, I would definitely suggest watching google for the VIN. You might find it locally and if the price is right, you'll know what the history of your car is, and be better suited to make a buy-back bid that might be more in line with what you feel is a fair offer. Unfortunately you might also find that the best you'll be able to get is about what the lease buyout price was since you now have a dealership that needs to make profit thrown into the mix.
 
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