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Hello,

i am seeing my electricity bill spiked up after i started charging my Volt Gen 2 car. How can i check how much electricity bill is being used when i am charging my car. I stay in CA and i dint opted my PGE bill to EV category
 

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Hello,

i am seeing my electricity bill spiked up after i started charging my Volt Gen 2 car. How can i check how much electricity bill is being used when i am charging my car. I stay in CA and i dint opted my PGE bill to EV category
Log in to MyVolt.com. You should be able to find your charging details there. If you can find the link to download the data, you can view it in a spreadsheet and get a good estimate of your daily charging stats.
 

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If you are charging at 110v you can also measure the cumulative usage more directly with a 'kill-a'watt' device. Search on Amazon or elsewhere for details.

KNS
 

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If you are charging at 110v you can also measure the cumulative usage more directly with a 'kill-a'watt' device. Search on Amazon or elsewhere for details.

KNS
The EPA estimate for gen2 is 31-32 kwh per 100 miles, from the wall plug. That's an approximation, but it includes average charging and TMS overhead. It can be lower for city driving, or higher for highway driving. myvolt.com should track your charging events, and give an estimate as well.
 

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What are you calling a spike? A Volt/ELR uses so little electricity that I can't see it on my electric bill. Pool pump uses WAY more.

There should be a link from your electric company of usage in 15 minute intervals if you have a smart meter. In high rate States like CA, it might be smart to look at EV or off-peak rate plans.
 

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Pool pump uses WAY more.
For Sure! I can see in the app from my electric company when the pool pump turns on every day! I can also see when I plug my car in, based on the hourly usage stats. Overall though, I did not experience a large jump in my monthly bill when I started charging.
 

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If you are charging at 110v you can also measure the cumulative usage more directly with a 'kill-a'watt' device. Search on Amazon or elsewhere for details.

KNS
When I tried to use my Kill-a-Watt with my 2017 it would not work. The Kill-a-Watt screen flickered and the charger shut off, though the LED's didn't indicate a problem. I bought this, but haven't had time to install it.
http://www.amazon.com/DROK-Digital-Multimeter-Amperage-Transformer/dp/B015PRF04I?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00
 

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Why not just compare your current bill to an old utility bill from before you had the car. The total KWh are always shown. In fact, if you are on PGE, they always include a small graph showing how much you used in the current period compared to how much you used in the same period one year ago. It may not reflect the car usage exactly, but it will be a pretty darn good indication.
 

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Not if you are using one of the newer variable speed pumps... Mine uses about 3 Kwh a day...


What are you calling a spike? A Volt/ELR uses so little electricity that I can't see it on my electric bill. Pool pump uses WAY more.
 

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What are you calling a spike? A Volt/ELR uses so little electricity that I can't see it on my electric bill. Pool pump uses WAY more.

There should be a link from your electric company of usage in 15 minute intervals if you have a smart meter. In high rate States like CA, it might be smart to look at EV or off-peak rate plans.
Speak for yourself ;)

My Volt has averaged 200kWh / mo since I got it. My entire electric bill is 300-450 usually, so the Volt is a huge percentage of my total. Luckily, I charge for free about half the time at work, so it only averages 100kWh on my actual bill. But yeah, I have a small apartment, I'm sure for a house with pool etc that it is much less noticeable.
 

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What are you calling a spike? A Volt/ELR uses so little electricity that I can't see it on my electric bill. Pool pump uses WAY more.

There should be a link from your electric company of usage in 15 minute intervals if you have a smart meter. In high rate States like CA, it might be smart to look at EV or off-peak rate plans.
Actually, quite the contrary. In Northern CA, charging a Volt from full battery depletion daily (which is often the case) uses up the entire baseline electricity household allotment, plus 20% to 30% more. The typical household has a baseline allotment of 10 kWh, give or take 1 KWh depending upon location. That's 2x what my pool uses.

For a household that goes 200+ percent of baseline (not uncommon) charging a Volt can cost $2 to $3 a day in Northern CA. So it's like buying one gallon of gasoline -- currently a wash between electricity and gasoline driving.
 

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Why not just compare your current bill to an old utility bill from before you had the car. The total KWh are always shown. In fact, if you are on PGE, they always include a small graph showing how much you used in the current period compared to how much you used in the same period one year ago. It may not reflect the car usage exactly, but it will be a pretty darn good indication.
We who live in the midwest have to live with something called temperature swings, maybe you guys living in sunny California haven't heard the temperature can vary from day to day and from one year to the next. In spring, summer and fall my monthly electric usage can double or triple depending on how many day we use AC.
 

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We who live in the midwest have to live with something called temperature swings, maybe you guys living in sunny California haven't heard the temperature can vary from day to day and from one year to the next. In spring, summer and fall my monthly electric usage can double or triple depending on how many day we use AC.
That's why you would do best to compare with the same period from the year before, not just the last month, and as I mentioned, the graph on our billing statement does just that.

For the record, I have personally experienced seasonal temperature extremes between 16*F and 112*F where I live in northern California. Just the other day it was 101*F ten miles to the east of me, and 60*F twenty miles to the west of me; on the same day, and at the same time! Microclimates are typical for this time of year. I'm not claiming that our weather isn't way nicer (on average) than the midwest, just that we are not all ignorant to climate variations. (You need to look to socal for that ;) )
 
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