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How much would you pay for a Tesla authorized Supercharger adapter?

  • $500

    Votes: 7 58.3%
  • $1,000

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • $1,500

    Votes: 2 16.7%
  • $2,000 or more. If more specify how much in a post.

    Votes: 3 25.0%

  • Total voters
    12
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Discussion Starter #1
Let me be clear in the text of this post and hope it is clear in the poll.

Tesla has revealed that Model 3 Supercharging will not be free. If Tesla implements "pay as you go" Supercharging for the Model 3, they could easily come up with adapters for Chademo cars and CCS cars that would have electonics built in to do the "handshake" with the car and the Supercharger limiting voltage and current to what ever that adapter is set up for. This is not "how much would you pay per mile" for the electricity... this is "how much would you pay for the adapter".

Later,

Keith
 

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This is not "how much would you pay per mile" for the electricity... this is "how much would you pay for the adapter".
They go hand and hand IMO...$2K and FREE charging is pretty attractive...Or $500 for the adapter and $2K to Tesla for free charging is still attractive if you drive a lot...Some are reporting "$4.95 CCS plug in fees", that's certainly not attractive...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Those are adapters for the HPWC, not the superchargers.
The HPWC will get a Tesla about 55 miles per hour of charge. The SuperChargers will get you that 55 miles in about 7 minutes.
And the supercharge will not work just because you plug in the right kind of plug... Even with a Tesla S or X it has to do an additional electronic handshake to verify the cars VIN is authorized supercharger access. The adapter I am envisioning would give the correct electronic handshake to authorize use and limit voltage and current to what the car it was made for can handle.

This entire poll is based on the Tesla Model 3 having "pay as you go" access to superchargers rather than paying an up front fee for unlimited charging. Tesla has learned their lesson from Model S and X owners who never charge at home and clog up Superchargers.

If you add half a million more cars all trying to use Superchargers for their local charging, long distance Tesla use would become a nightmare and virtually grind to a halt! It is already bad in some areas with Locals clogging up Superchargers.

Despite what many people seem to think, Tesla is a for profit corporate entity that wants to encourage EV adoption of any kind... allowing pay as you go charging for non Tesla EV's would meet both of these goals.

If they make it a "pay per min connected" rather than "pay per kWh charged" that would encourage slow charging cars to only charge the minimum they needed to get where they are going, and "penalize" them for clogging up the station for long periods of time while adding to Tesla's profits.

Keith
 

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Musk's exact words yesterday were:

"to drive long-distance with the Model 3, but it will not be free long distance for life unless you purchase that package"

At a minimum it would appear a lifetime package will be available...Then you have to look into how much would it cost Tesla to allow for a pay per charge system...Is it as simply as software update to the SC or will they need to make hardware major changes to the SC themselves? They were originally designed to be free for life forever...
 

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The survey isn't very well defined. For a Volt? Hard to see the point of a DC charger for a 18 kWh battery pack so nothing which isn't an option. For a Model 3 or Bolt EV? Probably still nothing. Given the limited range BEVs are still local driving machines IMO, and an EREV or rental ICE makes the most sense if you want to go on a road trip.
 

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As a Volt owner, roadside fast charging is worth nothing to me since battery capacity and the on board charger render use of roadside chargers impractical. Besides that, I have virtually unlimited access to the charger I carry with me.

KNS
 

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As a prospective Bolt EV owner, I'd love to be able to access Tesla's network but I probably wouldn't do it very often - perhaps just a dozen or so times a year on a long road trip. So I'd far prefer a "pay as you go" system to the "lifetime subscription" model. I'd like to see a fairly cheap adapter (I tried to vote "$500" but it didn't seem to take) and I'd be content with a fairly hefty price tag per charge because I'd be paying for the long-distance capability which might not otherwise exist for me. But as the CCS charging network builds out there will be competition and so I wouldn't expect the prices to get too high.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The survey isn't very well defined. For a Volt? Hard to see the point of a DC charger for a 18 kWh battery pack so nothing which isn't an option. For a Model 3 or Bolt EV? Probably still nothing. Given the limited range BEVs are still local driving machines IMO, and an EREV or rental ICE makes the most sense if you want to go on a road trip.
As a Volt owner, roadside fast charging is worth nothing to me since battery capacity and the on board charger render use of roadside chargers impractical. Besides that, I have virtually unlimited access to the charger I carry with me.

KNS

Ummm, this is the BOLT sub forum... why would I be posting information for the Volt here? The Volt has zero provisions for DC fast charging and could not use a supercharger no mater what you did. You are one of the people that would have told Ford back in the early 1900's that ICE powered cars will never catch on unless he put a gas tank in them that would let them cover 500 miles... and that gas stations are a dumb idea because ICE cars don't have enough range. Why did you even look at this thread? Why are you looking at Bolt information if it doesn't interest you?

Keith
 

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I wouldn't even pay $500, which I consider very steep for just an adapter. If Telsa opens up their charging network for pay as you go, then they should adopt the North American standard (CCS) and have the proper connector on their stations.
 

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While the DCFC handshake adaptation to Bolt CCS may not be too difficult, the adapter does have to securely authenticate the user, so I could see this being non-trivial. An ID and/or VIN would have to be programmed into the adapter. And KWHr used would have to be billed in a secure manner. I could see $200 in high volume, but at low volume, yeah, could be $500. Maybe it talks BT or WiFi to your phone.

More interesting to me would be a Tesla to J1772 adapter, which would allow L2 use of the thousands of Tesla HPWC (destination chargers). But problem being there is no authentication means and no billing model possible on those. Tesla already paid to install them, on the agreement that the property owners offer free use.
 

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This is not "how much would you pay per mile" for the electricity... this is "how much would you pay for the adapter".
None. Tesla Motors has no interest in opening a shop and selling here in Puerto Rico. Ford does sell hybrids, but GM only sells gas engine models.
 

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Why are you looking at Bolt information if it doesn't interest you?
Not everyone looks at the subforum. I rarely do. I look at the first page, which I'm pretty sure is what happens for most people. Also note that I answered for the Bolt EV and the Tesla Model 3. My answer to both was that I'd never pay anything for supercharging because I don't think it's worth anything. Renting an ICE makes way more sense. The survey should have the option that you wouldn't pay. I don't understand why you find that offensive.

The whole idea that supercharging works for long distance travel rests on some very particular assumptions. Last month we went to Portal Arizona. How would supercharging work on that trip? It wouldn't. And even in a BEV for many trips J1772 would be more convenient. Take going to the Norton Simon in Pasadena or the Getty for example. Those trips are very typical and roundtrip are about 200 miles. I'd want or need some more range. To get it, I could spend a lot of time going out of my way and fighting traffic traffic to get to a supercharger and then wait as it charged. Or I could just use a J1772 charger located near or at the museum and get all the charge I needed while visiting the museum and having lunch, which I'd do anyway. So why would I pay for an unnecessary hassle of a supercharger?
 

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More interesting to me would be a Tesla to J1772 adapter, which would allow L2 use of the thousands of Tesla HPWC (destination chargers). But problem being there is no authentication means and no billing model possible on those. Tesla already paid to install them, on the agreement that the property owners offer free use.
In the "what is is possible" category, i3's are using the destination chargers. I don't think Tesla has any control over which vehicles are allowed to use the chargers. The operator is after all paying for the electricity.
 

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I am making a couple of assumptions, so correct me if I'm wrong:
  • The adapter is for DCFC to Tesla.
  • I would still be required to pay for usage.
Your poll doesn't have an option for me, because I would be willing to pay $0. In my area, Superchargers are not as prevalent as DCFC stations, and the Superchargers we do have are always crowded. For me, the value add is very low, and even the cheapest option ($500) would pay for many thousands of miles of driving using DCFC stations.

If Tesla wants to give me the option to pay to use their charging infrastructure, they need to provide me with the adapter for free.
 

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In the "what is is possible" category, i3's are using the destination chargers. I don't think Tesla has any control over which vehicles are allowed to use the chargers. The operator is after all paying for the electricity.
Then you would be wrong. The destination chargers are just regular Tesla chargers that the owner of the property can put up for use. This is no different than putting up a clipper creek charge therefore making it available to anyone that can plug in.

The Super Chargers are a completely different ball game as they are owned and run by Tesla. These come with communication tools that can identify who is plugging into their chargers and can keep anyone off that they want to.

On that note why do any of you think Tesla is going to open up their Super Charging network to everyone? With the increase in demand just from the model 3 why would they let people who cannot even come close to the charge rates that Tesla can pump out clog up their network? This is also a great selling point on why you should buy a Tesla over any other electric car and if you think Elon is going to give that up along with making a Tesla owner wait for a leaf to finish charging you are high.
 

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Then you would be wrong. The destination chargers are just regular Tesla chargers that the owner of the property can put up for use. This is no different than putting up a clipper creek charge therefore making it available to anyone that can plug in.
Since the discussion was about AC destination chargers, not DC superchargers, if we're wrong then you're wrong. And if you're wrong then we must be right! :)

I doubt Tesla would open up the superchargers but one never knows.

I don't see this as a big deal. Everywhere I've stayed that had a destination charger also had a J1772 charger. So what's the big deal? The rate is higher of course on the Tesla charger but it's a "destination" charger where you'll be parked for extended periods of time.
 

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On that note why do any of you think Tesla is going to open up their Super Charging network to everyone?
There are two obvious answers to that question:

(a) to promote EV usage. Elon's already said that other manufacturers are welcome if they are able to charge quickly enough

(b) to turn the charging network into a profit centre. The more customers are out there, the more money they can invest into expanding the network and turning a profit from it.
 
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