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I think the charging status display will also tell you the charging voltage and amperage.
 

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It should say on the DIC when charging.
If the car is off and you open the door and it wakes up to show charge level, etc. It should show charge cord connected, 240V.
 

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Your phone app will also charging status
 

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Discussion Starter #8
...And it will charge twice as fast as with 110v
Not having a quick reply I went out and looked at the time till a full charge for plugged into the regular outlet then unplugged and put it to my 240 outlet. Indeed Im getting much faster charging through the adapter. I will check out your other methods in the am. thanks. DD
 

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Agree with the DIC. When I open my door my DIC indicates either 110-120V if I'm on L1, and tells me when charging should be complete, or it indicates 208-240 if on L2, and again giving an estimated completion time. This is on a Gen 1, Gen 2 may be different.
 

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If you're in North America and you're in the 21st century, I can tell you you're *not* charging at 220V.

You're charging at 240V. :p
Every home has to verify its utility voltages. Some may be below 220 VAC and some may be higher than 240 VAC, as in my case which is 246 VAC because my pedestal-mounted utility transformer is across the street (less than fifty feet) from my meter with a very low feed resistance, and I am one of the four home getting power from it. Higher voltages allows lesser currents for the same load, so my breakers last longer (42 years up to now). And that same transformer can supply me a second 240 VAC and 100 A feed for my own 20 kW DC charger if I buy two BEVs in the future.
 

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Every home has to verify its utility voltages. Some may be below 220 VAC and some may be higher than 240 VAC, as in my case which is 246 VAC because my pedestal-mounted utility transformer is across the street (less than fifty feet) from my meter with a very low feed resistance, and I am one of the four home getting power from it. Higher voltages allows lesser currents for the same load, so my breakers last longer (42 years up to now). And that same transformer can supply me a second 240 VAC and 100 A feed for my own 20 kW DC charger if I buy two BEVs in the future.


Is there a single-phase 240V DC charger available? I've only seen 3-phase DC chargers.
 

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If you're in North America and you're in the 21st century, I can tell you you're *not* charging at 220V.

You're charging at 240V. :p
I've given up trying to teach people that there's no such thing as 220 or 110.

Every home has to verify its utility voltages. Some may be below 220 VAC and some may be higher than 240 VAC, as in my case which is 246 VAC because my pedestal-mounted utility transformer is across the street (less than fifty feet) from my meter with a very low feed resistance, and I am one of the four home getting power from it. Higher voltages allows lesser currents for the same load, so my breakers last longer (42 years up to now). And that same transformer can supply me a second 240 VAC and 100 A feed for my own 20 kW DC charger if I buy two BEVs in the future.
Yes, actual might vary, but it's nominal 120/240V
There is no one targeting 110/220 in N.A. as a grid supply. It may dip that far with poor distribution and overloading, but it's supposed to be 120/240.
You would be a good candidate to prove the volt charger is both amps and watts limited. Hard to find >240V these days ;)
Someone bring a volt to PR!
 

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If you're in North America and you're in the 21st century, I can tell you you're *not* charging at 220V.

You're charging at 240V. :p
condos and apartments run on 3 phase power that is 208 volt , ive seen that 208v number at 220v
220v comes from motors
they list them at 220 v so they will work at 208v or 240v, the + or - 10% rule works at 220v
 

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Not having a quick reply I went out and looked at the time till a full charge for plugged into the regular outlet then unplugged and put it to my 240 outlet. Indeed Im getting much faster charging through the adapter. I will check out your other methods in the am. thanks. DD
In case you don't know, it's all about power. Power is current times voltage. You sound like you're adapting the stock gen2 EVSE for L2 usage, so you're going from a max of 120V x 12A = 1.4 kW, to 240V x 12A = 2.8 kW. Literally exactly twice the power, so you should charge about twice as fast. Note that a "true" L2 EVSE would go higher than the 12A max of the stock unit, usually 14-15A, giving 3.3 - 3.6 kW, which would charge even faster, but may not be worth the cost above adapting the stock EVSE like you're doing just for that extra 20%.
 
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