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On VoltStats is a guy who lives near me with a reported 273 Emiles in 24 hours without any gas. Now if I give him credit for getting 55 miles per charge that would be five charges at 4 hours a piece with four hours left to drive the 273 miles which would be at 68 mph! I am suspicious since he is listed as an IT specialist that he hacked the software. Rocky, are you out there to explain yourself?
 

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Did you take into account that the first charge would have been done before the 24 hours started?

Also, I think they mentioned that about 2-3 hours of charge was all they did at each stop, because the last half hour is mostly to balance cells. So, they stopped/charged more often, to maximize the miles gained per hour of charging.
 

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On VoltStats is a guy who lives near me with a reported 273 Emiles in 24 hours without any gas. Now if I give him credit for getting 55 miles per charge that would be five charges at 4 hours a piece with four hours left to drive the 273 miles which would be at 68 mph! I am suspicious since he is listed as an IT specialist that he hacked the software. Rocky, are you out there to explain yourself?
Don't doubt it if the person is plug1in, he also posts here, really did this, plus another just over 300 all electric miles in 24 hours with carefully optimizing his mileage per charge (typically over 60) and how much time he spent on the charger.

there are others who have exceeded what Ari_C has done, but only by gaming the system. (not starting at stopping at the same altitude and using mountain mode to recharge at a higher rate while heading back up the hill and possibly with towing. By the way, volt stats reports the full electric mileage for a trip made after midnight as on the previous day if the trip started before midnight.

This was a big deal for a while at the beginning of Voltstats, but once a couple of people had 300+ mile days, the others pretty much gave up.

imagine this- start at 12:01 with a full battery, drive 60 miles at 40 mph to 1:30, charge to 5, drive 61-120 till 6:30, charge to 10, drive 121 to 180 unitl 11:30, charge until 3, drive 181 to 240 until 4:30, charge until 8, drive 241 to 300 until 9:30, charge until 11:55, drive 300 to ?? until the charge is gone.... I know that last bit is not within 24 hours.... The charge rate is limited to 3.3 kw, but if you make sure that you have 240 volts at the plug, you will get the full 3.3 kw (some EVSE's will have lower voltage at the plug for a variety of reasons and 220 volts is slower than 240.
 

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You are probably referring to the almighty ari_c. ari_c can squeeze 70 miles out of a charge, and spending 24 hours to see just how ma y EV miles he can do in 24 hours sounds like his kind of fun.
 

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Towing the car up a hill and driving back down is certainly cheating the system. Doing just normal driving with opportunity charging when it's convenient, I've managed to hit 120 miles in one day. That was a day with several near empty battery events and several hours to recharge before going again. I wasn't trying to set records, it just worked out that way. I could easily hit 200 if I set aside an entire day just to play that game. Hitting 300 sounds like a very lofty goal and one I just don't care to even attempt. I know exactly how I could game the system for a cheat to hit 300 though: tie a rope to the trailer hitch of my pickup and have someone else drive it while I get towed down the highway. Heck, I bet we could even hit 400 doing that... Not that I ever would.
 

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On VoltStats is a guy who lives near me with a reported 273 Emiles in 24 hours without any gas. Now if I give him credit for getting 55 miles per charge that would be five charges at 4 hours a piece with four hours left to drive the 273 miles which would be at 68 mph! I am suspicious since he is listed as an IT specialist that he hacked the software. Rocky, are you out there to explain yourself?
At 55 miles per charge , he was averaging around 5 miles per Kwh.

He started with a usable 11 kwh and 273 miles requires about 55Kwh . (273/5)

55-11 = 44kwh charging needed . 44kwh/3.3kwh = 13.3 hours of charging . This leaves more than 10 hours for driving .
 

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I don't have a Volt, but as an EE, I wish to know how "220 volts is slower than 240". A voltage difference does not slow down the speed of the electrons. And if the Volt is charging at 3.3kW per hour at both voltages, the charge is the same. Did a law of Physics change here?
 

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At 55 miles per charge , he was averaging around 5 miles per Kwh.

He started with a usable 11 kwh and 273 miles requires about 55Kwh . (273/5)

55-11 = 44kwh charging needed . 44kwh/3.3kwh = 13.3 hours of charging . This leaves more than 10 hours for driving .
5 miles per kWh is a good value for an EV. And it is becoming old news that the Volt needs a better onboard charger than the 3.3 kW per hour it has. We hope that the next generation does allow 6.6 kW per hour or more. And if the future Volt battery can hold more than 24kWh, the fast DC charging feature must be included.
 

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I don't have a Volt, but as an EE, I wish to know how "220 volts is slower than 240". A voltage difference does not slow down the speed of the electrons. And if the Volt is charging at 3.3kW per hour at both voltages, the charge is the same. Did a law of Physics change here?
No, it doesn't... but it lowers the amount of power.

Power (Watts) is current (amps) multiplied by pressure (voltage). 240V x 15A = 3600W. 220V x 15A = 3300W. (Yes, I know the Volt draws a bit less than 15A at 240V, this is just an example)


Thus charging at 3600W would be faster than charging at 3300W. (yes, I know the Volt limits charging power to 3.3kW, this is just an example of different voltages. Lower voltage = less power. Less power = longer charging time)
 

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No, it doesn't... but it lowers the amount of power.

Power (Watts) is current (amps) multiplied by pressure (voltage). 240V x 15A = 3600W. 220V x 15A = 3300W. (Yes, I know the Volt draws a bit less than 15A at 240V, this is just an example)


Thus charging at 3600W would be faster than charging at 3300W. (yes, I know the Volt limits charging power to 3.3kW, this is just an example of different voltages. Lower voltage = less power. Less power = longer charging time)
I am no expert on the subject , but it is my understanding that I have 240v and around an 8% heat loss when charging.

3600 x 0.92 = 3312 watts

If my home had 220v it would either mean less wattage unless it was able to draw 16.5 amps instead of 15 .
 

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On VoltStats is a guy who lives near me with a reported 273 Emiles in 24 hours without any gas. Now if I give him credit for getting 55 miles per charge that would be five charges at 4 hours a piece with four hours left to drive the 273 miles which would be at 68 mph! I am suspicious since he is listed as an IT specialist that he hacked the software. Rocky, are you out there to explain yourself?
Started at midnight with a full charge. Went 56 miles R/T from my house, all on electric. Got back around 1:30am, charged for 3 1/2 hours then repeated. Did this 5 times. As I was approaching midnight, I only charged enough to allow me to deplete the battery one final time before midnight. Most of the driving was on GW parkway at 45 mph or less.

Not hard to do if you want little sleep. I could have done better but there was a torrential downpour that evening that required me to run the A/C to keep the windshield clean which probably cost me a few miles. The Volt was either being driven or charging for the entire time except for the last four minutes before midnight.

Where are you in Arlington?
 
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