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Good info there and my results are in line with theirs. When people ask about this I tell them to expect 30-40% range loss in real winter weather.
 

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The Fleet Karma graph also shows the impact of hot weather. My Volt's efficiency gauge doesn't seem to get that really hot weather also saps power from the batteries. That 65-70F sweet spot is real.
 
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
ICEVs are efficient in winter because they waste over 60% of the gasoline energy as heat everyday, so we don't see such MPG changes. Those who know thermodynamics understand why this is so, but for the electro-chemical cells in electric vehicles, lower temperatures does affect the transport of ions and electrons in any material. Hybrids do well as they have both a heat engine and motors, but taking into account the long term usage according to temperature, they also lose MPG in colder weather.

So the best conditions for EV owners is to move to warmer climates. The best climate for all EVs are the tropics (between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn). But those who prefer to live in cooler climates have to accept the cooling effects on their EVs, so they should stop winning about it.

BTW, this statement:"To avoid this additional penalty, we parked the Bolt in a heated garage while it charged after the highway run. " means that the driver wasted more energy to heat the garage (remember it is full of air and that is a huge mass to heat!) than to heat the Bolt. So I would not recommend a heated garage just to get a better Bolt EV range.
 

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ICEVs are efficient in winter because they waste over 60% of the gasoline energy as heat everyday, so we don't see such MPG changes. Those who know thermodynamics understand why this is so, but for the electro-chemical cells in electric vehicles, lower temperatures does affect the transport of ions and electrons in any material. Hybrids do well as they have both a heat engine and motors, but taking into account the long term usage according to temperature, they also lose MPG in colder weather.

So the best conditions for EV owners is to move to warmer climates. The best climate for all EV are the tropics (between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn. But those who prefer to live in cooler climates have to accept the cooling effects on their EVs, so they should stop winning about it.
ICE's are not efficient, wasting 60-75% of gasoline as heat and noise. I think what you meant to say is they are very inefficient year round, so a small increase in inefficiency during winter is not noticed by the average driver, especially those who don't have a efficiency measurement like EV's do.

Drivers new to owning an EV or who have not done much research, are often surprised by the mileage hit the car takes during winter. They are not whining as much as they are surprised and concerned there may be a battery issue. Once they are clued in, they understand and have another reason to look forward to spring.

Of course PHEV's like the Volt offer the owner the option to waste gas during the winter just like their old car, instead of using the battery for heating :)
 

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ICEVs are efficient in winter because they waste over 60% of the gasoline energy as heat everyday, so we don't see such MPG changes. Those who know thermodynamics understand why this is so, but for the electro-chemical cells in electric vehicles, lower temperatures does affect the transport of ions and electrons in any material. Hybrids do well as they have both a heat engine and motors, but taking into account the long term usage according to temperature, they also lose MPG in colder weather.
High MPG ICE vehicles see up to a 20% reduction in their winter MPG numbers. We battle this issue every winter over on CruzeTalk.
 
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BTW, this statement:"To avoid this additional penalty, we parked the Bolt in a heated garage while it charged after the highway run. " means that the driver wasted more energy to heat the garage (remember it is full of air and that is a huge mass to heat!) than to heat the Bolt. So I would not recommend a heated garage just to get a better Bolt EV range.
I didn't read this as a recommendation to increase range but rather a way to better match the conditions for the comparison.
 

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Living in a state that has winter, loss of range in cold is a big deal. Over the winter months I averaged 3m/kwh and now that it's warm again I am up to 4m/kwh. On really cold days I was down about 2.5. That is a huge swing in range between warm and cold days. On a good day it's 240 miles, a bad day 150. Now the good thing is my daily commute is less than 150 miles so I don't have range anxiety on my daily commute. In summer I can do day trips, but in winter between the long charge times and short range my Bolt is limited to a daily driver and no trips to other cities.
I did use it for a trip to the airport which was 140 miles round trip and I had to charge for an hour to get home. It was cold and charging was limited to 24kw. I personally think the limited cold range and slower charging will limit ev adoption in places other than SoCal. I realize that it's a function of current battery tech, but the average consumer will be really disappointed when they buy a 300 mile range car and it only goes 200 miles.
My tdi used to get worse milage in winter, but it was 41 mpg instead of 45 mpg. Only a 10% change, not the 25 to 38% reduction I see with the Bolt.
 

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This is why I went went the Volt and not the Bolt. I live in northern NB and my research showed I would take a huge hit in range with a pure EV in the winter. I dont mind driving on gas when I have to and I should be able to do 80 to 90 percent Electric for 6 months of the year. I can live with that :)
 

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stop and go traffic jam on a no cloud sunny day at 110 F in Texas at least 2x the power with no window film.

In cold weather the inside temp does not go lower than outside temp but direct sun light adds a lot of heat load.

conduction, convection and radiation but at least In Texas if we leave our hat and boots on we can take off out shirt :)
 
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