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Interesting. This slots pretty neatly in between the Volt and the PiP. Like the Volt, it has electric heat (all three have electric A/C,) so it isn't forced to run the engine in winter - but like the PiP, it still uses the engine when maximum power is called for (no data in the article about how much EV power it allows. The article seems to say it has a bigger main drive motor than the Volt, but I really doubt the battery can deliver 124 kW safely (20C - 3 times the Volt's maximum, and historically the realm only of LiPo among the lithiums.))

Not enough electric range for me, but a credible effort, and it should make a pretty good direct competitor with the Energi twins once Ford gets their act together.

Lots of folks aiming for the low side of the Volt in various implementations. I wish I saw a couple cars bracketing the high side, too... (More electric power, longer range in an EREV.)
 

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Yeah, this would have been a lot better with just 5kwh more capacity. I'm glad they made it, though. It's a nice transition car.
 

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Unless the ICE is way more efficient than any other on earth, using gas to fill up the battery seems like a marketing gimmick rather than a feature that improves efficiency in any way. What am I missing?
 

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I like Honda but I think they hit their peak with the Acura Legend. Since then it's been not so great design and/or drivability. I don't see this having much appeal but I hope they sell all of these they can make.
 

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When will this be available, and what would be the price?
They said January of 2013, but didn't list a price that I could see.

The 15-mile AER seems generous, and I'll wait until the EPA has actually had a chance to assess it. I do find it interesting how it's strengths and weaknesses match up with the Volt's strengths and weaknesses. An objective head-to-head review of the PiA and Volt would be really, really interesting. I would say that the PiA definitely has some key advantages including faster charging and and a more efficient ICE (both things that the Volt probably should have come with and, hopefully, will come with in the future). A quick assessment:

Power/Performance: Favors the PiA
All electric range: Favors the Volt
Fuel economy (short trips): Favors the Volt
Fuel economy (long trips): Favors the PiA
Overall economy: Favors the Volt (PiA not eligible for the full $7,500 tax credit)
 

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Everyone is making an EREV with a lot less battery so they can play the numbers game with the MPGe.

A lot of people are going to be dissappointed with the EV range and the 100MPGe for such a low percentage of their drive.

The Volt is the only one that can cover 80% of the drivers daily commutes, and will get 94-98 MPGe A LOT.

The ligher batteries of the competition gives them better MPGe, but the public gets duped because they think it's better than a Volt. The average driver will not realize this, and wonder why they can't get 100+ MPG with these cars!
 

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Everyone is making an EREV with a lot less battery so they can play the numbers game with the MPGe.

A lot of people are going to be dissappointed with the EV range and the 100MPGe for such a low percentage of their drive.

The Volt is the only one that can cover 80% of the drivers daily commutes, and will get 94-98 MPGe A LOT.

The ligher batteries of the competition gives them better MPGe, but the public gets duped because they think it's better than a Volt. The average driver will not realize this, and wonder why they can't get 100+ MPG with these cars!
Technically, nobody else is making an EREV yet, except maybe the Karma, and it's debatable. The rest are PHEVs, but not EREVs (EREV is a subset of PHEV, the defining trait of which is full performance/operational capacity as an EV until the battery is drained. The Karma is manually switched, but still has much higher performance with the engine on.)

Since the thing I love most is the silent effortless performance, I'd be less happy with a PHEV that isn't an EREV.
 

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The infrequency with which the Volt engages its ICE definitely is a major advantage. Unfortunately, people are still not very knowledgeable about the various forms of technology. Even people I know who are very knowledgeable about cars don't know what to make of this new generation of BEVs, EREVs, PHEVs, etc.

What will be interesting to see is whether Honda got the technology right. We still have to wait and see if there are any engineering issues or problems. I will say from the start that I am somewhat concerned about an air cooled battery. It's better than no TMS at all (Nissan, I'm looking at you), but I wonder how well it will do in hot climates. Especially with those faster charging times.
 

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Technically, nobody else is making an EREV yet, except maybe the Karma, and it's debatable. The rest are PHEVs, but not EREVs (EREV is a subset of PHEV, the defining trait of which is full performance/operational capacity as an EV until the battery is drained. The Karma is manually switched, but still has much higher performance with the engine on.)

Since the thing I love most is the silent effortless performance, I'd be less happy with a PHEV that isn't an EREV.
From what I've read, the Fisker gets like 20-21MPG in CS mode - that's pretty lousy!

I've always thought that dropping in the equivalent to the Cobalt SS engine (260HP/260tq Turbo) was quite a waste, especially when using it as a range extender.

Heck, why not just use a VW V10 TDI? It would be just as dumb...
 

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I will reserve judgement until I see a price...as to the riff its the only car that can charge its battery, they need Volt 101. I also wonder about air chilled batteries, that is inherently inefficient.
 
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