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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
To those of us with the Premier model (which has the rear view camera integrated into the mirror and thus eliminates it as an option for a quick and easy Homelink install), has anyone figured out where would be a good place to add it in? I wondered about placing one of the small 3 button units into the ceiling upholstery just aft of the overhead console. There is a bit of a bulge there which forms a nice empty cavity with nothing in it (I looked).

This is a pic of from another type vehicle, but you can get the general idea:


Just have to figure out a convenient power hookup from the overhead console. Does anyone have a better location scoped out? and/or does anyone have a wiring breakdown for the various circuits in the overhead console ? (preferably not involving Onstar, just the dome lights)


afterthought: I sure miss the days of being able to quickly and simply identify a hot and a ground. Seems like everywhere you look in a new car any more, there is a computer tied to the other end of each wire.
 

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I don't know about the Volt but I added Homelink to a 2015 Impala this Summer. You really have to watch when you are trying to figure which wires have power---some appear to have it but any load takes the voltage to zero---ask me how I know :) . On the Impala, I was able to get 12 volt power from the connector going to the right side reading lamp. This is what feeds the dome/reading lamps and powers the "theater" diming. If the design is similar in the volt, I would probe for the power there and after you find power and ground, slip the ends of your Homelink transmitter into the connector body and reconnect it to the reading lamp. Test to see if it works. The circuit I found in the Impala is switched (off when the car is off) but is in the retained power circuit so like the radio and lamps it is on until a door is opened or it times out. Powering down the Homelink does not cause it to loose memory but be aware that if anyone breaks into your car and opens a door, power will go to the transmitter and allow them to open your garage door. I am going to add Homelink to the Volt when I get around to it and hopefully someone will verify a connection point before I start.
 

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BTW--I was able to pick up power for the backlight for the buttons in the overhead console---I think it was from the light that provides illumination to the lower console area from a led in the Impala overhead console. The Volt has a similar lamp
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't know about the Volt but I added Homelink to a 2015 Impala this Summer. You really have to watch when you are trying to figure which wires have power---some appear to have it but any load takes the voltage to zero---ask me how I know :) . On the Impala, I was able to get 12 volt power from the connector going to the right side reading lamp. This is what feeds the dome/reading lamps and powers the "theater" diming. If the design is similar in the volt, I would probe for the power there and after you find power and ground, slip the ends of your Homelink transmitter into the connector body and reconnect it to the reading lamp. Test to see if it works. The circuit I found in the Impala is switched (off when the car is off) but is in the retained power circuit so like the radio and lamps it is on until a door is opened or it times out. Powering down the Homelink does not cause it to loose memory but be aware that if anyone breaks into your car and opens a door, power will go to the transmitter and allow them to open your garage door. I am going to add Homelink to the Volt when I get around to it and hopefully someone will verify a connection point before I start.
On my Volt I was able to simply replace the rear view mirror with a used rear view mirror with Homelink (from a Kia Optima) and just used the leads from the autodimming mirror. It was super easy! There's a thread with lots and lots of info over in the Volt section.
 

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See the other threads about adding homelink to a Gen 2. It's very common across many models. I added it to my 2000 GMC Sierra overhead console using parts from an earlier model Chevy Blazer :)
 

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On my Volt I was able to simply replace the rear view mirror with a used rear view mirror with Homelink (from a Kia Optima) and just used the leads from the autodimming mirror. It was super easy! There's a thread with lots and lots of info over in the Volt section.
I don't think you'll want to do that with the Bolt, at least not if you have the safety package or a Bolt premier, as in that case, the rear view mirror is a digital rear review mirror.

I think the omission of Homelink is silly and will be missed a little bit on our Bolt, but it's easy enough to work around by carrying a garage opener remote with you. A bit surprised it's not at least an option or part of the Premier model.
 

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See the other threads about adding homelink to a Gen 2. It's very common across many models. I added it to my 2000 GMC Sierra overhead console using parts from an earlier model Chevy Blazer :)
+1.

The g2 volt thread started by teksavy in late 2015/early 2016 is a detailed step by step procedure that looks like it was built in to the car.

Might work for a bolt as well if your handy and your comfortable taking on this type of project.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I don't think you'll want to do that with the Bolt, at least not if you have the safety package or a Bolt premier, as in that case, the rear view mirror is a digital rear review mirror.

...
Yeah, I already mentioned that in the first sentence of the original post:

To those of us with the Premier model (which has the rear view camera integrated into the mirror and thus eliminates it as an option for a quick and easy Homelink install), has anyone figured out where would be a good place to add it in? ...
The exclusion of the rear view mirror as an option for a Homelink retrofit was basically what prompted this whole thread. As I also mentioned, I think using the 3 button units would fit quite well in the overhead console, I just don't have the wiring/circuit info for what's up there in the Bolt.


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My low tech solution is to use the mini-transmitter that came with my opener. It clips or velcro's to the light panel plastic frame. The color is a close match and it's in the same area as the Homelink buttons would be.

Bolt EV Garage Opener.jpg
 

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My low tech solution is to use the mini-transmitter that came with my opener. It clips or velcro's to the light panel plastic frame. The color is a close match and it's in the same area as the Homelink buttons would be.
Was curious about the Bolt (and found this thread) when I saw on FB that more users are DIYing on the GEN II Volt.

Did anyone figure out why GM stopped putting in Homelink into their advanced EVs? (And, yes, the TM3 has it ... although I don't know if it auto-closes the garage door and auto-opens (based on GPS loc) the garage door like the S/X can ... update, yes, just read the TM3 w/premium_opt will do auto-close/open).
 

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Was curious about the Bolt (and found this thread) when I saw on FB that more users are DIYing on the GEN II Volt.

Did anyone figure out why GM stopped putting in Homelink into their advanced EVs?
The consensus is that the cost to GM of licensing the Homelink technology had become to high. Also, Homelink uses older technology that is dated and not all that secure. On a basic level, if I program the Homelink visor and it works whether or not my vehicle is running (as most do) then anyone can break into my garage or home. All that someone would have to do to gain access is to break into my vehicle, if it was parked outside the garage, use the Homelink visor to open the garage door. No thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The consensus is that the cost to GM of licensing the Homelink technology had become to high. Also, Homelink uses older technology that is dated and not all that secure. On a basic level, if I program the Homelink visor and it works whether or not my vehicle is running (as most do) then anyone can break into my garage or home. All that someone would have to do to gain access is to break into my vehicle, if it was parked outside the garage, use the Homelink visor to open the garage door. No thanks.
This is why it is best to simply hook up to a switched 12V source, which is what is readily available in the location, and NOT a direct 12V supply which requires much more effort. This is basically a no-brainer, and contrary to your assertion, I would guess it is the way the majority of those who have made the modification installed them. :-/
 

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The consensus is that the cost to GM of licensing the Homelink technology had become to high.
So GM is not putting Homelink on any of their vehicles now? That doesn't sound right to me.

Also, Homelink uses older technology that is dated and not all that secure...
I thought long ago there were issues but then again putting the one that came with your garage door opener on your visor just allows people to break your window and use it since it is not tied to your cars 12v electrical system.

Gararge door security has also changes since 1993.
See: http://www.garaga.com/blog/en/is-your-garage-door-opener-vulnerable-to-a-hack/

Also, be aware that garage door openers fabricated by most manufacturers and manufactured before 1993 were equipped with a dip switch system (+, 0, – ) to program its issuer. Then, you opened the case of your transmitter and you moved the dip switch to code your opener.

How to protect yourself against that?
Try to locate the fabrication date on your garage door opener. This information can be found on the motor box, along with the model number and the device’s serial number. You can also look on your remote transmitter to see if the words SECURITY+ or Rolling Code can be found. If this is the case, know that your door opener has the built in rolling code technology. This means that after every single use of your garage door, the code on your transmitter changes. The technology has about 1 million possible code options.

LiftMasterTM and Chamberlain companies offer this rolling code system since 1993. In 1996, they started to offer the Security+ System, and since 2013, they offer the MyQ technology Security+2.0 which allows to open and close your garage door with your smartphone. It’s the most practical technology yet!
Our 2011 Volt's homelink works flawlessly.
Our 2016 Volt uses the visor one that came with our garage door opener since GM didn't provide a built-in one.
Both cars were > $40K.
 
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