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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In anticipation of a Bolt purchase next spring :)D :D :D) I need to make some 240v home charging infrastructure upgrades and would like some confirmation of my choices.

My current EVSE setup was purchased in 2012 for my Toyota PIP, and it's been used for my Volt since March 2014.

Current setup:
EVSE box: 240v 15kW/60amp Juicebox- no upgraded needed (reprogramming or trim pot adjust to enable 7.2kW rate).
15 amp J-handle & cable- needs upgrade.
12/2 AWG copper from mains panel to Juicebox- 40ft run- needs upgrade.
15 amp breakers- needs upgrade.

Proposed upgrades:
40 Amp J-handle/cable: ITT CANNON J2CE4021-25
8/2 AWG copper for mains panel to Juicebox- 40ft run. Ampacity chart here.
30 or 40 amp breakers.


Looks good?

Thanks... Rob
 

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I see it as "good". My Level 2 JuiceBox EVSE (see my signature) can handle 80 amps (I upgraded its internals) yet it is presently installed on a 40-amp circuit, and is set up for 30 amps (7.2 kW) with the 30-amp J1772 cable, exactly what the 2017 Chevy Bolt EV can handle. I can upgrade up to 10kW with cable and breaker swapping for a 100-amp circuit.

I live less than 50 feet from my utilty transformer (we have underground service) so I can request a new 125-amp feed and set up a 25kW DCFC in the future for the Bolt EV or for a larger BEV.
 

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12/2 is technically sufficient to charge the Volt on 240V. It will only pull 12A, so you can still use a 20A dual pole breaker.
8/2 is way overkill, but if you plan to upgrade to a different EV in the future, it doesn't hurt to have some expansion room.
Other than that, looks good.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys...

Sorry if I wasn't clear- I'm looking to upgrade the current 15amp J-handle/cable , 12/2 wire and 15amp breakers in order to handle the Bolt 7.2kW charging in 2017.

Not too happy to be using a 40amp J-cable (thick and heavy) but the next lowest rated cables (32amp) seems like cutting it too close to the Bolt's max draw at 30amps.
 

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I had mine upgraded basically to what you have as your recommended. I had 8/2 AWG put in and put in a 40 amp, 240 V breaker myself. I bought my juicebox with the ability to charge more (in terms of KW) than my current Volt. I let the settings be a maximum of 40 amps, although the Volt only takes 16 amps max anyway.

I was wondering if I should've put in even larger AWG, just in case. I wouldn't use it for the Volt, but I assume new EVs could use larger current.
 

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I should say that a lot of the cost of installation (even if you do it yourself) is drilling through joists/walls/etc. Also, if you have to run conduit, the size of the conduit is dictated in part by the size of the wires. If you want to pull larger wire, you may have to change the size of the conduit. So, I made my decision to support at least Level 2 charging, but if I had it to do over again, I might go even larger, as the incremental cost to support another level isn't much. (Of course, if I had it to do over again, I'd put the box in the garage in a different spot -- it's currently at the rear of the Volt if you drive in normally, with the front of the Volt farthest away from the garage door.)
 

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When I did my L2 install, I decided to future proof myself somewhat. I did 8/2 AWG with a 40amp and a 7.2kW max evse. I knew my volt wouldn't take advantage of this, but I know my next vehicle will.

On that note... I have been VERY tempted by a new 2015 Kia Soul EV+... I'm upside down on my Volt by a few thousand at this point, BUT if the Kia dealer is willing to give me 0% financing and come up to what I owe on Gizmo... I might say goodbye.
 

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12/2 is technically sufficient to charge the Volt on 240V. It will only pull 12A, so you can still use a 20A dual pole breaker.
8/2 is way overkill, but if you plan to upgrade to a different EV in the future, it doesn't hurt to have some expansion room.
Other than that, looks good.
The Gen 1 Volt will draw 14A continuous for up to a maximum of 3.3 kW charging, Gen 2 is 16A for up to a maximum 3.6 kW charging
 

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I should say that a lot of the cost of installation (even if you do it yourself) is drilling through joists/walls/etc. Also, if you have to run conduit, the size of the conduit is dictated in part by the size of the wires. If you want to pull larger wire, you may have to change the size of the conduit. So, I made my decision to support at least Level 2 charging, but if I had it to do over again, I might go even larger, as the incremental cost to support another level isn't much.
L3 charging in a home?
 

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<snip>

On that note... I have been VERY tempted by a new 2015 Kia Soul EV+... I'm upside down on my Volt by a few thousand at this point, BUT if the Kia dealer is willing to give me 0% financing and come up to what I owe on Gizmo... I might say goodbye.
IIRC, the transmission will be a 6-speed automatic. That won't be as smooth as the Volt's. Are you willing to give that up? The refinement of the Volt is a big plus for me, just one continuous smooth surge forward, no jerking.
 

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As I just installed a pretty basic Schneider Electric EV230WS EVlink 30-Amp unit (of which the Ontario gov't reimbursed half the cost), I am curious with these custom-kits in this thread, how long it takes to charge the Volt from empty, and if pumping high kW loads into the battery shortens battery life.

I know that using constantly using DC-Fast-Charging on my Leaf (CHAdeMo, 60kW) will speed up the degrading of its battery. Curious if this is the case for the 7.2kW on the Volt.
 

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The note at the bottom of:
http://www.chevrolet.com/bolt-ev-electric-vehicle.html
indicates that the Bolt will actually use 32A (7.6KW), not just 30A.
If the EVSE is advertising 30A, the Bolt will have to default to the next lowest level the OBCM supports, we don't know that the next step down would be 30A (although it would certainly be nice). Would be a bummer if the next step down is only 24A.

Also, I remember that Clipper Creek upgraded their HCS-40 at the end of 2014 from 30A to 32A. I wonder if they knew something then that we didn't :)

I would expect no different battery degradation at 7.6KW. Per cell wise, this is a lower net rate on the 60-ish KWHr battery of Bolt, than the 3.6KW rate on the Volt 18.4KWHr battery.
 

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As I just installed a pretty basic Schneider Electric EV230WS EVlink 30-Amp unit (of which the Ontario gov't reimbursed half the cost), I am curious with these custom-kits in this thread, how long it takes to charge the Volt from empty, and if pumping high kW loads into the battery shortens battery life.

I know that using constantly using DC-Fast-Charging on my Leaf (CHAdeMo, 60kW) will speed up the degrading of its battery. Curious if this is the case for the 7.2kW on the Volt.
They are talking about the BOLT not the VOLT. The Gen2 Volt has a maximum charge rate of 3.6 kW.
 

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The note at the bottom of:
http://www.chevrolet.com/bolt-ev-electric-vehicle.html
indicates that the Bolt will actually use 32A (7.6KW), not just 30A.
If the EVSE is advertising 30A, the Bolt will have to default to the next lowest level the OBCM supports, we don't know that the next step down would be 30A (although it would certainly be nice). Would be a bummer if the next step down is only 24A.

Also, I remember that Clipper Creek upgraded their HCS-40 at the end of 2014 from 30A to 32A. I wonder if they knew something then that we didn't :)

I would expect no different battery degradation at 7.6KW. Per cell wise, this is a lower net rate on the 60-ish KWHr battery of Bolt, than the 3.6KW rate on the Volt 18.4KWHr battery.
I believe they are all actually 32A since that is the standard for a 40A breaker. Even if it says 30A in the publicity., if the breaker is 40A, it will run at 32A.
 

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In anticipation of a Bolt purchase next spring :)D :D :D) I need to make some 240v home charging infrastructure upgrades and would like some confirmation of my choices.

My current EVSE setup was purchased in 2012 for my Toyota PIP, and it's been used for my Volt since March 2014.

Current setup:
EVSE box: 240v 15kW/60amp Juicebox- no upgraded needed (reprogramming or trim pot adjust to enable 7.2kW rate).
15 amp J-handle & cable- needs upgrade.
12/2 AWG copper from mains panel to Juicebox- 40ft run- needs upgrade.
15 amp breakers- needs upgrade.

Proposed upgrades:
40 Amp J-handle/cable: ITT CANNON J2CE4021-25
8/2 AWG copper for mains panel to Juicebox- 40ft run. Ampacity chart here.
30 or 40 amp breakers.


Looks good?

Thanks... Rob
8/2 AWG with a 40 amp breaker should do it (for 32A continuous) unless you have significant other cables going that direction also. In that case I might opt for 6/2.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
8/2 AWG with a 40 amp breaker should do it (for 32A continuous) unless you have significant other cables going that direction also. In that case I might opt for 6/2.
Thanks,
The EVSE supply cable is isolated from all other runs, it literally runs 3' from the breaker panel to an outside wall then burried in PVC conduit straight to the EVSE.
 

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I believe they are all actually 32A since that is the standard for a 40A breaker. Even if it says 30A in the publicity., if the breaker is 40A, it will run at 32A.
A 40A circuit can certainly provide 32A, but the current draw is determined by what the EVSE tells the car, not the circuit or breaker. If the EVSE says 30A max, by signaling a Pilot signal of 50% duty cycle to the car, then that's all the car will draw, that's all that's allowed by J1772 standard. The EVSE must tell/"advertise" to the car what the car can draw, a 53% duty cycle on the Pilot signal is necessary for the car to draw 32A. The Pilot signal duty cycle is determined by firmware and hardware in the EVSE, it generates the signal without knowledge of wiring or car.
 

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...The EVSE must tell/"advertise" to the car what the car can draw, a 53% duty cycle on the Pilot signal is necessary for the car to draw 32A. The Pilot signal duty cycle is determined by firmware and hardware in the EVSE, it generates the signal without knowledge of wiring or car.
...except that it's the responsibility of the installer to program the EVSE with the maximum allowable current it can draw from the installed wiring. So in that sense it "knows" how much current the wiring can support.
 

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Thanks,
The EVSE supply cable is isolated from all other runs, it literally runs 3' from the breaker panel to an outside wall then burried in PVC conduit straight to the EVSE.
Hey, Rob, be sure to investigate the requirement to size the cable correctly for feeding through the conduit, and select the conduit size correctly, too. You don't want to have a safety issue or be gigged if your work is ever inspected. Google the National Electric Code for the information.
 
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