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Discussion Starter #1
I've been trying some different EV and ICE modes on my commute to work and home. My commute takes me from sea level, up to about 1,800 feet, then down to sea level. The original strategy that I used, was to use "hold" after the first few miles, then go to ICE up and over the hill. I would then use EV in the flat lands and during commute traffic.

This week, I changed things up. I charged my car to a full charge (53 miles). I then used ICE 18 miles up to the summit, and then switched to EV on the downhill run (about 15 miles). The first day, my EV mileage gauged indicated 64 miles, the second day it was higher, and today it read 84 miles at the bottom of the mountain.

I'm curious as to what the highest EV readings others have seen on the Volt's guess-o-meter.
 

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The 2011/2012 Volt full charge ev range estimate had a 50 mile maximum, the later Gen 1 models at 60. Don’t know if the Gen 2 maximum has yet been determined.

Just a reminder that when driving downhill, braking regeneration will recharge a battery that is not already at the maximum soc level, and this battery power can then be used to power the electric motor. The amount of regen you get from downhill driving doesn’t depend on the driving mode, only the way it’s later counted. If the regen occurs while the car is in Range Extending mode (Hold, MM, or fully depleted), the use of that regenerated battery power will count as Gas Miles. If the regen occurs while the car is in Electric Mode (Normal battery use), the use of that regen will count as Electric Miles.

Your kWh Used is a net power consumption number (grid power consumed less regen put back into battery). Driving uphill and downhill in Hold mode doesn’t affect the kWh Used. Driving downhill in Electric mode will decrease the kWh Used number as regen is put back into the battery for later use. When a Gen 2 Volt fully depletes the battery, the amount of power used to achieve the AER includes ~14 kWh of grid power plus the regenerated power created during the Electric Mode part of the trip. Some would consider using Hold to drive uphill and Normal to drive downhill as gaming the system. It will increase your AER by including a lot more regen power in the calculation not offset by any grid power used for the uphill drive. The range estimation algorithm will use this inflated AER data when calculating the next full charge range estimate. That’s why your range estimate has been increasing.

Your estimate at the bottom of the mountain, of course, is an on-the-fly estimate of how far you can drive on the available power if you keep driving downhill.
 

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Go by the bars, not the Estimated electric range. It can be meaningless. I've gotten as high as 86 on the estimated electric when I've gone up a mountain mostly in Hold mode and come back down in Normal and recharged at home. No way I'm going to get 86 miles on electric.

Best,
Rick
 

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Go by the bars, not the Estimated electric range. It can be meaningless. I've gotten as high as 86 on the estimated electric when I've gone up a mountain mostly in Hold mode and come back down in Normal and recharged at home. No way I'm going to get 86 miles on electric.

Best,
Rick
If you are driving a GEN 2 you may not be as far from that goal as you think.

After driving, using brake regen, not the paddle or L, allowing to coast when possible which also allows regen, I get the reading after charging of 83. Now this number is VERIFIED with Odometer miles, as a mater of fact it is not uncommon for the ODOMETER miles to be HIGH than the miles range number.
That has been my top number so far. May be the best it can go but weill see before it starts getting cold out and the mile range starts to drop.
 

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If you are driving a GEN 2 you may not be as far from that goal as you think.

After driving, using brake regen, not the paddle or L, allowing to coast when possible which also allows regen, I get the reading after charging of 83. Now this number is VERIFIED with Odometer miles, as a mater of fact it is not uncommon for the ODOMETER miles to be HIGH than the miles range number.
That has been my top number so far. May be the best it can go but weill see before it starts getting cold out and the mile range starts to drop.
Sorry, I am confused....

Have you actually driven 83 miles on a single charge?

Thanks,
Rick
 

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Sorry, I am confused....

Have you actually driven 83 miles on a single charge?

Thanks,
Rick
Not only did the Odometer indicate I traveled 84 miles, I still had enough to get home without the Extender kicking on.

I believe this ride included driving some extended 30 mph and some various 40-45 mph road stretches. We are pretty much a flat land here.

This was one of those days where the batt range was 83 but the odometer read more when the trip ended....

I read that Voltainians all have their own methods to drive, including using the paddles and L which I think is too harsh and limits
the roll you need to actually average in those regen miles. The more I try to understand the formula for figuring estimated miles, the more things I think it considers to figure your range estimate.
I do use the cruise almost all the time as it allows regen even on the road, slight hills etc. Driving the Volt the way I do has become completely normal and more often than not I am reading these high Odom readings.. The Odom readings are generally pretty close to what the Batt range estimates are.
 

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On a single charge from overnight I show an estimated 114km before I leave the garage. After I come home from work (105km) I show on average 5-8km estimated remaining. The farthest I 've driven on a single charge has been 113.7km and the engine kicked in at 14.1kw used.
 

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Noob here, so not much experience yet. Went to a friend's house about 40 miles away with the car reading 72 miles (~116 km) estimated. No expressway, but did see 55+ MPH with stops in a couple of towns and some hills along the way. ("Hills" here are probably nothing to some of you.) Came home the same route and ICE kicked on at the 75 mile (121 km) mark. I didn't drive aggressively nor did I drive holding up people behind me. Just normal driving. It was, however, only about 72 deg outside so didn't have A/C on.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Good info. I'm still learning about how to maximize EV miles. In experimenting with my commute, I think I've come up with a strategy to increase my EV miles. Today I drove 58 EV miles and 30.7 ICE miles @ 39.5 Mpg during my commute. This is an increase of 10 EV miles over my previous strategy.

In a future iteration of the Volt, the car would learn and adapt to driving conditions to maximize EV and ICE. Then again, battery technology may be so advanced that we can all drive 500 miles on a charge.
 

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I've had my 2017 for a little over a month now and being in Texas with mostly flat long distances to drive, the best I'll usually do on a charge is 55 miles all electric. This is slowly going up though as I figure out what works best. Also we are seeing temps of 102F every day here, so the AC is getting a workout.

I drive around 70 miles a day round trip for work, on the stretch of highway where speeds are 65-70, I'll put it into hold mode for that 15 mile stretch. The return trip I'll go all electric till it kicks over to gas.

What I'm seeing is that even with the AC running most of the time, I'll do 75% of my commute in all electric mode. Once the weather cools down to where I don't need AC, I'm sure I'll get a little more range. Of course in the winter range will drop off some when it gets freezing cold.

Glad I have a garage with 240V charging -- my plan even in the cold months is to remote start the car and blast the heater during the pre-condition cycle using juice from the wall. Can then take off with a mostly warm car and not need to run the heater on battery power ever.
 

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Glad I have a garage with 240V charging -- my plan even in the cold months is to remote start the car and blast the heater during the pre-condition cycle using juice from the wall. Can then take off with a mostly warm car and not need to run the heater on battery power ever.
I found a better way to warm up the car. Turn on your Volt with it still plugged in. Set the heat on ECO, max fan speed, temp HIGH. I monitored the SOC in my 2012 Volt doing this and the 3.3 kWH charger is able to keep up with the heater on ECO. Not so on comfort. The state of charge does not drop on ECO. This way, the car stays warm, you just unplug and go.
 

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I found a better way to warm up the car. Turn on your Volt with it still plugged in. Set the heat on ECO, max fan speed, temp HIGH. I monitored the SOC in my 2012 Volt doing this and the 3.3 kWH charger is able to keep up with the heater on ECO. Not so on comfort. The state of charge does not drop on ECO. This way, the car stays warm, you just unplug and go.
So, do you go to the car, set this up, and then come back after a while? Or do you set your settings for this, remote start the car, and go to the car after a certain time period?
 

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I bought my 2017 LT 2 1/2 months ago and the highest estimate I've seen is 83 miles. However, I'm consistently getting 81 - 83 miles on every charge. Most of my trips are under 50 miles so I haven't had much chance to do an odometer check but I did take one 75 mile trip. I left home with 82 miles showing and got back with 8 miles left, so for me, it seems pretty accurate. I think I could do better, but the terrain around Atlanta is quite hilly.
 

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I bought my 2017 LT 2 1/2 months ago and the highest estimate I've seen is 83 miles. However, I'm consistently getting 81 - 83 miles on every charge.
Do you live inside an M.C. Escher print, so that you can go downhill both ways?!?

Seriously, though, that's excellent. I've been getting a bit over 60 miles on mine, which I've owned for just under two weeks.
 

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I bought my 2017 LT 2 1/2 months ago and the highest estimate I've seen is 83 miles. However, I'm consistently getting 81 - 83 miles on every charge. Most of my trips are under 50 miles so I haven't had much chance to do an odometer check but I did take one 75 mile trip. I left home with 82 miles showing and got back with 8 miles left, so for me, it seems pretty accurate. I think I could do better, but the terrain around Atlanta is quite hilly.
Efficient driving during daily moderate-distance commutes will translate into higher full-charge range estimate numbers. The challenge is to maintain that efficiency over a full-charge-using drive. The greater distance of the full-charge-using drive tends to include a greater variety of terrain (more up and down hills?) and more time on mileage-lowering high-speed roads. Getting an AER in the 80s to match or exceed a full-charge range 80+ mile estimate would be a great feeling! Are your AER numbers matching your full-charge range estimates?
 

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We got 52 before the engine kicked in. It has been our max and probably will be unless we leave Atlanta and charge somewhere.

Our Prius always got 3+MPG more in FL where my parents live, so I bet we could pull 60+ down there but there are too many lights and people here to get a good flow going.

Our Prius averaged 44mpg over its life here.
 

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Highest I've ever seen the guess gauge was 73 after a long downhill. Furthest I've ever driven in all EV was 61miles and the EV guess meter said I could go another 12... felt about right.

Also today was the 1st time the engine maintenance (ie burn old gas) feature turned on.
 
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