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Discussion Starter #1
So I just noticed some verbal sludge (I'm calling it that because it's such an OLD error) at the bottom of an article on the Edmunds.com page about the Volt, and here's what I sent them. (see below). I think if they get several emails they will be more likely to update their incorrect info. So feel free to copy & paste mine (below)

I sent to Edmunds:
Hi,

Thanks for the informative article on the Volt sedan.

At the end of this article (link http://www.edmunds.com/chevrolet/volt/?sub=hatchback )
it is stated that the 2011 Volts were "recalled for a potential battery fire that could occur during a very particular severe side crash. Make sure any used Volt has received the needed fix."

This is factually erroneous on two points. 1) there was never a recall (so the wording should be amended to reflect that) and 2) the battery fire occurred LONG after the NHTSA crash test, NOT during the crash test. So saying the fire could occur during a crash is unfounded (this has never ever occurred).

Appropriately accurate wording would be "Early 2011 Volts were offered an optional customer satisfaction battery-protection upgrade after severe NHTSA side-crash testing totalling the Volt followed by the NHTSA's failure to properly discharge the battery (as is now standard for electric vehicles) led to a battery fire in one of their crash test Volts about three weeks after the crash test. In response, GM issued an optional upgrade that strengthened the battery protection, preventing such an occurrence. While the NHTSA investigation concluded that there was "No discernible trend" toward fire risk in the Volt, this upgraded battery protection is now standard in Volts and is available freely from GM on the early 2011 Volts that did not have this design."

Sources:
http://www.nhtsa.gov/About+NHTSA/Press+Releases/NHTSA+Statement+on+Conclusion+of+Chevy+Volt+Investigation

http://media.gm.com/content/media/us/en/gm/news.detail.html/content/Pages/news/us/en/2012/Jan/0105_volt.html

Thanks! I appreciate your efforts at Edmunds to provide objective, useful information for consumers!"
 

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Let GM with their gaggle of lawyers address the inaccuracies. Petitions will be ineffective.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Let GM with their gaggle of lawyers address the inaccuracies. Petitions will be ineffective.
Maybe I shouldn't have said "petition" but 'inform.' As a matter of fact, a while after the Volt got crash tested (before the non-fire non-issue), I had emailed Edmunds because their page said the Volt had not been crash tested. They promptly responded to my email and corrected their info.

Objectively, this is as neutral of a fact as that.... though it was highly politicized.
 

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This is factually erroneous on two points. 1) there was never a recall (so the wording should be amended to reflect that) and 2) the battery fire occurred LONG after the NHTSA crash test, NOT during the crash test. So saying the fire could occur during a crash is unfounded (this has never ever occurred).

Appropriately accurate wording would be "Early 2011 Volts were offered an optional customer satisfaction battery-protection upgrade after severe NHTSA side-crash testing totalling the Volt followed by the NHTSA's failure to properly discharge the battery (as is now standard for electric vehicles) led to a battery fire in one of their crash test Volts about three weeks after the crash test. In response, GM issued an optional upgrade that strengthened the battery protection, preventing such an occurrence. While the NHTSA investigation concluded that there was "No discernible trend" toward fire risk in the Volt, this upgraded battery protection is now standard in Volts and is available freely from GM on the early 2011 Volts that did not have this design."
One correction. ".. combined with GM's earlier failure to notify the NHTSA of the procedures required in the event of battery damage."
 

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Discussion Starter #5
One correction. ".. combined with GM's earlier failure to notify the NHTSA of the procedures required in the event of battery damage."
Yeah I think you are right. GM's manual/paperwork for the NHTSA did not, at that time, contain that info, IIRC.
 

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One correction. ".. combined with GM's earlier failure to notify the NHTSA of the procedures required in the event of battery damage."
I thought I had read somewhere that the NHTSA had failed to follow published procedures for "decommissioning" the battery after a crash.
 

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I don't see any such information on the Edmunds iPad app. My problem with their review are 2 items. Their comment on poor brake modulation leads me to believe they have not modified their driving style to suit the Volts method of operation. The other thing is there is 2 - 3 years of data available to get cost of ownership data, there is no excuse not to have some data for the Volt.
 

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Yeah I think you are right. GM's manual/paperwork for the NHTSA did not, at that time, contain that info, IIRC.
Perhaps I missed it what you have seen, but the only procedure for discharging a Volt battery in the service manual requires specialized equipment and is not recommended if you haven't had Volt training.

The public procedure is to contact OnStar or a dealer and let them handle it.
 

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Man, so many models, primarily gasoline, have had fire specific recalls over the past 14 months. Unbelievable number. Not sure what's going on in the design rooms to cause this. Well over 1,000,000 vehicles recalled. Just about all brands.
 

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Wow, that is some blatant truth twisting PopSci.

Following their lead, "The Ford C-Max Enegri under best conditions can sometimes travel up to 21 miles on battery. In contrast, the Chevy Volt can travel 380 miles (extended range)."
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Wow, that is some blatant truth twisting PopSci.

Following their lead, "The Ford C-Max Enegri under best conditions can sometimes travel up to 21 miles on battery. In contrast, the Chevy Volt can travel 380 miles (extended range)."
I would really like to meet some of you guys... You are way too cool.
Ancy to get my Volt...
 
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