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In my case: I commute about 60K miles/year. About 40 miles each way to work. Then I do lot of getaway driving, sports, family activities etc. About 200 miles/day effective range should be enough for me. For long trips I would keep a BMW 3 diesel that I really like. I would buy a commuter otherwise I would ruin the BMW really quick at this pace.

I am about to buy either the Volt 2019 Premier or Tesla Model 3 260 miles. As I said the extended range of the Volt (which is a great concept) may not be a must in my case since I will keep the BMW for snow days and long Summer trips between Palm Desert to Seattle.

This is how I see the pros and cons for Volt 2019 Premier vs Tesla Model 3 260 miles:

Using discounts, maybe I can get a Volt 2019 Premier for US$34,000 (- $7500).
The Tesla Model 3 is currently US$46,000 (-$7500).

What I hear is that the depreciation on the Volt is pretty high. Model 3 depreciation remains to be seen. I think based on the Model S that is not too bad. So let's say if I save US$1,500/year in gasoline savings with the Model 3 (I mean, most of my commute will be electric in the Volt) then in 5 years I would save about US$7,000 with the Model 3. So the difference would be that profound.

Anyone there has any specific recommendation on Volt 2019 vs Tesla Model 3 for my scenario?
 

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It sounds like both cars will suit your needs well and are good cars but there is a little more to be factored into your decision. Where are you located? Is there sufficient charging infrastructure (e.g. L2 charging for the Volt / Supercharging for the Tesla).

Repairs: Are you in the general vicinity of a Tesla dealership? A qualified (known good) Chevy dealership?

The Tesla Model 3 is having some growing pains as it appears there may be a design flaw that affects those who live in colder climates (not sure if this applies to you).

Insurance costs: I hear (anecdotally) that the Tesla commands a high insurance premium. I don't know how true that is.

Finally there is personal preference and taste. I think the Tesla Model 3 interior is ugly (yes I know it's subjective). For that much money there should be a less utilitarian feel to it. To be fair, I feel the same way about the BMW i3 so maybe it's just the floating panel thing I don't like.

Anyway - not much help as it's late here and I am tired but good luck with your purchase and whichever way you go, I think you will enjoy your purchase. Both cars more than fit what you are looking for.
 

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What's your commute like? Mostly freeway? Mostly traffic lights? How congested is it?

While there are a bunch of differences between the two cars, the one that I see as most important is Autopilot. On freeways and especially in congested traffic, it is a total game changer, and with OTA updates it'll continue to get better for the life of the car.

Obviously you'll want to test drive both and see how you fit into them and what you think of the sightlines and interiors. Tesla has gone very minimalist with the 3, maybe too far. They've got a big, beautiful display in easy reach that can do most anything - but you have to go into it for practically everything.

Keep in mind, unless Congress takes action Tesla's tax credits start dropping for deliveries after the first of the year - and if an order today is still delivered this year, it won't be for much longer. GM has a few more months before the same thing happens to them.

I'd probably go Tesla in your shoes, but there are legitimate arguments in both directions and your personal perspective on the interior and driving experience are probably the most important parts.
 

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The Model 3 is the better driving car but the Volt has a couple of advantages, it has Android Auto and a massive dealer network. How far are you from the Tesla service center? If it's convenient than service won't be an issue but if it's at the far corner of the spiral arm of the galaxy then I'd lean toward the Volt because there is no place in America that's far away from a Chevy dealer. Do you use Android Auto or Apple Car play, if not than that's a non-issue for you, for me the lack of support for AA is a major downside of the Tesla.

One more thing. The Volt has a conventional UI, the Tesla doesn't. All controls on the Tesla are on the screen and even the gearshift seems a little weird. I've only test driven the 3 once so I can't really make an informed judgement, but my concern about the weird controls with the Tesla is about what happens when you hand the car to a parking valet. When you test drive the Model 3 keep that in mind. Look more closely at the controls and decide for yourself.
 

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Extended range for the Volt means maybe you don't have to keep the BMW for the long trips. Maybe not need to decide which car to take or look for supercharging.
 

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Good advise here as to some of the differences that may or may not apply to you. Assuming these haven't ruled out one car or another it may go down to personal preference. Test drive both (if you can). Take your time in looking at the cars and how they fit into your lifestyle (you mentioned sports) carrying skis or what ever. What are your aesthetics? Some don't like the only centre screen and would prefer a straight ahead screen of the Volt. Sometimes the smallest thing (for some people) can make the biggest difference. Only you know you.
 

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So let's say if I save US$1,500/year in gasoline savings with the Model 3 (I mean, most of my commute will be electric in the Volt) then in 5 years I would save about US$7,000 with the Model 3. So the difference would be that profound.
Does the $7000 savings for the Model 3 vs the Volt, factor in the increased electricity costs? Obviously that car will use more electricity than the Volt, and Superchargers are not always free anymore.

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How far are you from the Tesla service center? If it's convenient than service won't be an issue but if it's at the far corner of the spiral arm of the galaxy then I'd lean toward the Volt because there is no place in America that's far away from a Chevy dealer.
The three dealers nearest me don't sell or service Volts, Bolts or any other GM EV's - I have to drive quite a distance to one that does

Don
 

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The three dealers nearest me don't sell or service Volts, Bolts or any other GM EV's - I have to drive quite a distance to one that does

Don
Same here (nearest on is 30+ miles away) but nothing is static. The local Chevy dealer was bought out a number of months back and two different parts guys have said they are going to start selling Volts/Bolts. Don't know how long it takes to get certified or what the priority is.
 

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Factor in L2 home charging in your savings calculation if you don't already have it. And pay for the 2 hr. charge feature if you go Volt.
With either car, your BMW will be at risk, since, for many of us, there is "no going back". Good luck and report here after you put some miles on your new car.
 

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The three dealers nearest me don't sell or service Volts, Bolts or any other GM EV's - I have to drive quite a distance to one that does

Don
I looked it up, the nearest Tesla Service Center to you is in Atlanta, 400 miles away. It looks like buying an EV in Mississippi is pretty difficult but surely buying a Chevy is easier than a Tesla. I'm in a CARB state, Massachusetts, every Chevy dealer sells Volts and Bolts, so do the Chevy dealers in Southern NH, I bought mine in Nashua. The OP is on the West Coast, it sounds like Seattle but he wasn't absolutely clear. WA is also a CARB state, I'd bet every Chevy dealer sells Volts and Bolts. Washington also has two Tesla service centers, as does MA. The location of the MA service centers is lousy for me, if I lived near route 128 (the inner beltway around Boston), they would be fine but I live on 495 (the outer beltway around Boston) so their location sucks. The OP didn't say where he was relative to the Tesla Service Centers, if they are convenient than that's a non issue, if like me they are in a lousy location relative to his house then chance are he would have several convenient Chevy dealers to choose from.
 

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I may be biased, as I'm trading in my Gen2 Volt for a Model 3 LR AWD. Having said that, I've loved my Volt these last 3 years, but I planned on getting the Model 3, back when it was the Model E, 3 years ago. It wasn't ready, so I got the Volt. Now that the Model 3 is ready, I'm trading in my Volt, but if the Model 3 had not existed, I would have been happy driving the Volt for 200k+ miles and 10 years, like all of my prior vehicles. My other car is a 2001 330xi with 225k miles.

You've mostly mentioned cost and potential savings. If you choose the Tesla, you need to decide quickly if you are planning on getting the full tax credit. I think the current deadline is the end of the month, and if you're in a large city on the West Coast, odds are decent that you may actually get your car in time. As far as insurance is concerned, my insurer, Liberty Mutual, has told me the Model 3 won't be any more expensive than the Volt. As for depreciation, it is high on the Volt, I'm getting only $19+k for my 2016 with 26k miles. That's literally 50% after a little under 3yrs, not very good, but I wasn't really planning on trading it in when I bought it. The Model S, as you note, has held its value quite well, but when used Model 3s hit the market, there are going to be alot more of those than Model S, so whether it keeps its value as well, is hard to say, but probably not likely.

Ultimately, you need to drive each car. No one can tell you what you do or don't like.
 

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We have one of each. Ignoring cost, they really are very different cars. Mid-sized sedan with room in the back seat vs compact hatchback. Both are great driving cars, but the Model 3 is in a class of its own...
 

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In my case: I commute about 60K miles/year. About 40 miles each way to work. Then I do lot of getaway driving, sports, family activities etc. About 200 miles/day effective range should be enough for me. For long trips I would keep a BMW 3 diesel that I really like. I would buy a commuter otherwise I would ruin the BMW really quick at this pace.

I am about to buy either the Volt 2019 Premier or Tesla Model 3 260 miles. As I said the extended range of the Volt (which is a great concept) may not be a must in my case since I will keep the BMW for snow days and long Summer trips between Palm Desert to Seattle.

This is how I see the pros and cons for Volt 2019 Premier vs Tesla Model 3 260 miles:

Using discounts, maybe I can get a Volt 2019 Premier for US$34,000 (- $7500).
The Tesla Model 3 is currently US$46,000 (-$7500).

What I hear is that the depreciation on the Volt is pretty high. Model 3 depreciation remains to be seen. I think based on the Model S that is not too bad. So let's say if I save US$1,500/year in gasoline savings with the Model 3 (I mean, most of my commute will be electric in the Volt) then in 5 years I would save about US$7,000 with the Model 3. So the difference would be that profound.

Anyone there has any specific recommendation on Volt 2019 vs Tesla Model 3 for my scenario?
If you do get the Model 3 I'd get the AWD LR vs the 260. It's more money but it will make road trips possible. The problem with your plan on keeping the BMW is that after you get the Model 3 you won't want to drive the BMW. The thing about electric drive is that after a few minutes of using it you become intolerant of the noise made by an ICE. The Volt has a very quiet engine vs other ICE cars but I hate it when I have to use it at low speeds because I can hear it, at highway speeds it doesn't matter because the tires make more noise than the engine but when driving on a back road it's noticeable. The Model 3 is even quieter than the Volt on electric so the difference is going to be even more dramatic.
 

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Both are nice cars - you cannot go wrong with either.
The Volt feels and drives like a regular ICE car besides a few displays that look different.
The Volt is extremely reliable - to be seen how TM3 turns out.
The Volt works very well for longer trips (like 400miles +).
The Volt is a bit cramped inside, but it has huge trunk.

The Tesla M3 neither feels nor drives like a regular ICE. It is roomier, faster, better infotainment, better looking. However, it costs more, but you do get more.

Now is a great time to jump on either of the great vehicles. If you ave another ICE in the family for long trips - and have extra $$$ to burn - get TM3. Otherwise, get the Volt.

I am hanging on to both cars - my M3 and Gen II Volt.
 

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As for depreciation, it is high on the Volt, I'm getting only $19+k for my 2016 with 26k miles. That's literally 50% after a little under 3yrs, not very good, but I wasn't really planning on trading it in when I bought it.
When figuring depreciation, you gotta first subtract the tax credit and of course any discounts you received off msrp.

Factoring those things in, our 2018 Premier with an msrp of $39.8k, was only $27k before TTL.. So getting $19+k in trade for a 2016 sounds plenty fair to me and not an excessive amount of depreciation at all.

What they can offer you in trade is a function of what someone could instead buy a new Volt for, after the tax credit and discounts, not msrp. And that's way less than twice what you are getting in trade.

And what's nice about this is that someone who doesn't qualify for the tax credit, can still benefit from it if they buy a used Volt. So contrary to what some who want to kill the credit think, it's not just a tax break for the "rich".

Can you buy that new Model 3 for anything even remotely close to the $27k, after the tax credit and discounts, that we paid for our 2018 Premier? And we bought our 2018 just over one year ago, when it was just as new as a 2019 is now. Does Tesla offer any discounts, or can you negotiate a discount?

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One more thing to consider is reliability. The Volt is in it's third model year with the Gen2 design so the teething pains, of which there weren't many, have been worked out. The M3 is in it's first year plus Tesla is ramping up it's production to levels that are far higher than anything that they've done before. On insideevs there is a video of a Model 3 owner comparing it to a Model S loaner that they gave him, the reason that his Model 3 is in the shop is because they have to replace the steering wheel, that's right steering wheel. A lot of the M3 UI goes through the wheel which is why there is something to break but still have you ever heard about replacing a steering wheel before.


https://insideevs.com/tesla-model-3-owner-test-drives-model-s/
 

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Yes, of course the Volt has a tax credit, but so does the Tesla. And while the Model 3 has no history, the Model S seems to be holding a much higher %age of their MSRP.

Can you buy a Model 3 for around $27k? You might next year if you live in Colorado. Let's see, next year, the $35k model comes. By then, if you're lucky, the federal credit will be $3750. And in Colorado, you get another $5k state credit, so yeah, you might be able to get a Model 3 for $27k after credits in Colorado.
When figuring depreciation, you gotta first subtract the tax credit and of course any discounts you received off msrp.

Factoring those things in, our 2018 Premier with an msrp of $39.8k, was only $27k before TTL.. So getting $19+k in trade for a 2016 sounds plenty fair to me and not an excessive amount of depreciation at all.

What they can offer you in trade is a function of what someone could instead buy a new Volt for, after the tax credit and discounts, not msrp. And that's way less than twice what you are getting in trade.

And what's nice about this is that someone who doesn't qualify for the tax credit, can still benefit from it if they buy a used Volt. So contrary to what some who want to kill the credit think, it's not just a tax break for the "rich".

Can you buy that new Model 3 for anything even remotely close to the $27k, after the tax credit and discounts, that we paid for our 2018 Premier? And we bought our 2018 just over one year ago, when it was just as new as a 2019 is now. Does Tesla offer any discounts, or can you negotiate a discount?

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Yes, of course the Volt has a tax credit, but so does the Tesla. And while the Model 3 has no history, the Model S seems to be holding a much higher %age of their MSRP.

Can you buy a Model 3 for around $27k? You might next year if you live in Colorado. Let's see, next year, the $35k model comes. By then, if you're lucky, the federal credit will be $3750. And in Colorado, you get another $5k state credit, so yeah, you might be able to get a Model 3 for $27k after credits in Colorado.
I should have moved to Colorado. Then I could have bought our 2018 Volt Premier for $22k!

However I don't live there and we needed a car last year, not next year. And now that we have our Volt, we want to amortize out it's price over 8-10 years, rather than take a hit on a trade for the latest greatest EV. So maybe in 8-10 years we will get a Tesla. Who knows?

Since the tax credit(s) represent a smaller percentage of MSRP for a Tesla, it would stand to reason that a used Tesla would hold a higher %. And of course since afaik, one usually has to pay MSRP for a Tesla, that is what a used car buyer has to compare against, rather than a price discounted several $k off MSRP.

In other words what counts for depreciation is not off MSRP per se, but off what is actually paid. And in that comparison a used Volt does OK.


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