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I've decided to purchase an EVSE before yearend to take advantage of the tax rebate. I've narrowed my search down to the Juicebox Pro 40 or the Clippercreek HSC-40. I hope to install this outside and will build a small cover to keep the direct sunlight off the unit. It will be used on a Chevy Bolt when they finally make it to the right coast some time next year.

I'm interested in honest reviews from some of you that own either unit. Hope to hear from you soon.
 

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I have a CC HCS-40P and it's been solid. If I had to buy over again, I'd buy this unit. Well built, very good company/reputation. Check out Amazon and you will see dozens of reviews from verified purchasers, mostly 5 stars.

There are some other threads you can check out here as well that cover EVSEs, so likely your questions will be answered by perusing previous threads if you haven't done so already.
 

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Clipper Creek. Solid units, good prices, great service, outstanding warranty. Other stuff may be just as good, but I'm just fine with my CC. As far as I know, everyone around here that has one is, too. That's a whole lot of happy customers.

Steve
 

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HCS-40 here for 2 yrs now. Simple and reliable. There are units with more features, such as WiFi monitoring/control, but sometimes it's good not to complicate your life further.
 

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My Clipper Creek LCS-25 is over 4 years old and still going strong. And for me Made in the USA is very important, not to mention their customer service.
 

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I have a JuiceBox 40 ( not the Pro ) for my Gen 1 Volt. It works fine, can run on 120/240, and even came with a license plate frame that says "KISS MY AMPS".
 

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LCS-25 installed outside mid-2012, works flawlessly everyday since. My Only point is the cable is a bit rigid @ -20C & below but maybe they improved the low temperature cable flexibility, I do not know...
 

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I've been using a Leviton Level 2 going on 6 years now, first with a PiP and now with the Volt. It has performed flawlessly. It's a plug-in unit, so I take it with me when I visit my brother in Virginia.
 

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Go big now. At least 7.2 kW.
That's what the Bolt can use. (of course the Bolt can use a smaller EVSE also)

You know this is not going to be your last EV, right?;)
Probably not a bad idea. ClipperCreek is suggesting the HCS50 if you want to future proof, it's a couple of hundred dollars more than the HCS40. However in defense of the HCS40 my guess is that batteries will eventually max out at 120KVh, i.e. 2X the Bolt, once batteries get good enough to hold 120KVh any future improvements in chemistry will be used to make smaller and lighter battery packs not tom increase the capacity. The Bolt does 239 miles on it's battery, double that and you are at 480 miles which is more than enough especially when you consider that fast charging networks will be widespread in the next few years. To charge 120KVh from 0 to full would take less than 17 hours with an HCS40 so it will still be good enough especially when you take into account that under normal circumstances you won't use more that 100 miles of range in a day which will be about 33KVh assuming a full size car that gets only 3 MPKWh, not the 4 MPKWh that the Volt gets. To charge 33 KWh with an HCS 40 will take the same 4.5 hours that the Volt takes today.
 

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I would advise against future proofing. I bought a 30A Bosch SPX (not recommending it as had I read this forum before buying, I'd probably have a CC, not that there is anything wrong with the Bosch) and if I end up buying another vehicle, it's a crap shoot whether I will hit or miss the target. If I had to do it over again, I'd go cheap and expect to buy a bigger one later. DC chargers are coming and they are bound to drop in price so home users can afford them. And if I end up with a tesla, I may also shoot the moon for dual onboard chargers, way more than my 30A EVSE can supply. Tech is changing so fast (and at a snails pace at the same time). Someday we may not even have EVSEs and all but running on Mr Fusions.
 

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I second llninja on don't futureproof. Most people will never need more than 30A. (Note I'm saying 30A real charging, not breaker size/model number as some units are advertised. That would be a "40" = 30/32A charging depending on the unit)
I'd run the bigger wire just in case, but no need to go crazy here.

Just consider this:
You have to sleep some time. Let's say you get your full 8 hours.
Even if the car is away all day long and only has those 8 hours to charge, you're still getting 30A*240V*8 = 57.6kWh
Approx 90% for charge losses and you're looking at about 52kWh you can recharge every single night.
That's ~200 miles every single day you'd need to exceed in order to need a more powerful EVSE.

The only advantage to more power is faster charging, but same thing, only different timelines. That would mean you need to turn around and do 200 MORE miles in less than 8h? -> DCFC, not home charging.

I mean, the incremental cost isn't that much. Go wild if you want, but it's not really a need to go higher than that.

Not even touching on the fact that many homes would need electrical service upgrades to add more than a 40A breaker, which costs far more than the slightly bigger EVSE might.
 

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You only need to recharge what you use. If you drive 50 miles in a day, any car capable of taking 32A (Bolt, Tesla etc) will top off in less than 2 hours with similar capacity EVSE.
 

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DC chargers are coming and they are bound to drop in price so home users can afford them. And if I end up with a tesla, I may also shoot the moon for dual onboard chargers, way more than my 30A EVSE can supply. Tech is changing so fast (and at a snails pace at the same time). Someday we may not even have EVSEs and all but running on Mr Fusions.
For me, I would never install a DCFC as a home unit. After about 80% SOC, you are recharging at the same rate as a L2 charger.

The max I would go for a home charging unit is a ~19 kW (240 V @ 80 A) L2 charger, but I would much rather have two ~10 kW units instead. It is very unlikely that I both get a vehicle that can charge at 20 kW on L2 and drain it empty and need to recharge in only four hours every night.
 

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For me, I would never install a DCFC as a home unit. After about 80% SOC, you are recharging at the same rate as a L2 charger. ....
Actually on a Spark EV it's a multi step taper after 80% at a DCFC.
After 80% I'll see it just drop to 24kW until (?) 90%. Then another taper to ~12kW, I don't stay to see any final tapering.
I almost always bug out at 80%, which means a 10-15 minute pit stop, tops.

I'm sure the Bolt will have similar taper steps.

It's the Leaf that clogs up DCFC stations. I've read they taper to less than L2 rates because they don't have a proper TMS for the battery pack. In some areas owners are given a 'Free Pass' for DCFC and so Noob's think they should suck up every last free electron to 100%.
 

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Actually on a Spark EV it's a multi step taper after 80% at a DCFC.
After 80% I'll see it just drop to 24kW until (?) 90%. Then another taper to ~12kW, I don't stay to see any final tapering.
I almost always bug out at 80%, which means a 10-15 minute pit stop, tops.

I'm sure the Bolt will have similar taper steps.

It's the Leaf that clogs up DCFC stations. I've read they taper to less than L2 rates because they don't have a proper TMS for the battery pack. In some areas owners are given a 'Free Pass' for DCFC and so Noob's think they should suck up every last free electron to 100%.
It's hard to say. We could probably estimate the math right now given Motor Trend's assessment that the Bolt required 2 hours 34 minutes to charge to 100% on DCFC.
 

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My LCS-20 plug-in has been great so far. The charger is installed in the garage, but I charge the car outside.

I considered the idea of future proofing, but I'm normally keep cars for 4 or 5 years, so it didn't make sense for me.
 

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.. Motor Trend's assessment that the Bolt required 2 hours 34 minutes to charge to 100% on DCFC.
...Some one should tell MT it's Bad EV Etiquette to charge to 100% at a DCFC. Staying to the end is pinching it.:p

And how many times do you arrive with 0% SOC?

I guess what MT is trying to say is this is the absolute longest you can stay at a DCFC.
But then were they using a 50kW unit? There are 60 and maybe 80kW units on the way, supposedly.

Back on thread, I can see going the least expensive route to installing an L2 EVSE. Especially if you have an existing 240 circuit to use and don't have to pull wires.
 
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