GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
I hate stock calipers on open alloys, especially after they get all grungy and start showing rust. If a $250,000 McLaren can have shiny red calipers, why not a $50,000 Volt (other than the extra $200,000 of course). Took my left front wheel off, caliper dismounted, hung on S hook from spring. Flushed it with Rust Wash for a day, flushed with water, flushed with brake cleaner, dry, painted with Dupli-Color caliper Paint Kit (brush on). Second coat, after it dried to touch, painted the mounting bracket while on car, used a plastic bag to cover the rotor. Scrubbed down wheel with Bug and tar cleaner to get the black road tar off inside of wheel then soaked with Rust Wash and wire brush to get off balance of corrosion particularly behind the spokes. Taped off the wheel with painters tape and newspaper on the front and wheel rim at the back. Painted with Dupli-Color wheel spray paint graphite because I had a can I wanted to use up. It doesn't cover very well so had to use a number of coats and run into town to get another can.

Logistics: My hydraulic jack isn't low profile so had to run the car up on 2x6 to get the height. I use a steel plate I picked up at recyclers for the jack to sit on so it rolls as the car is lifted as the cement drive the car is sitting on is exposed aggregate. Jack was used on the Mickey Mouse ears. I used a scissor jack with rubber slotted contact point as a back up to the lifting jack as it's a cheap 2 ton jack. I use 2x4 on 2x6 for wheel chocks as well as e brake (since it's a front wheel being removed).Much better. Three to go


06 Done.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
So, now you have . . . . painted stock calipers

Don
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,219 Posts
I did the same to both my Volt and Bolt calipers. I used a "G2" 2 part epoxy paint kit from tirerack. The Volt's are 7+ years old and going strong, easy to clean.

Bolt EV caliper paint front.jpg Caliper Paint.jpg Bolt EV caliper paint kit G2.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
I'm probably in the minority here, but I really don't like the look of brightly painted sliding cast steel calipers. Anybody that knows cars knows that they're very different than the fixed caliper, opposed piston aluminum calipers you see on sports cars that sometimes are also painted bright colors.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,219 Posts
I'm probably in the minority here, but I really don't like the look of brightly painted sliding cast steel calipers. Anybody that knows cars knows that they're very different than the fixed caliper, opposed piston aluminum calipers you see on sports cars that sometimes are also painted bright colors.
I made model cars as a kid. Loved painting the engine block, etc. For me, I like the look of a splash of color in the wheels. I don't care if it's not a Brembo or something else, I just like the color accent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
If it's good enough for the hypersports cars, it's good enough for me. I don't care if it's a multi piston affair or single piston, it's better than rust. If red is too much you can paint them silver or black (or blue) to match your preference and car colour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,722 Posts
When I saw the title, I thought the OP had a real problem with the brakes. Not an esthetic issue. OK, so you painted them....

Good for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
...and I admit I puckered a good bit with, "...I used a scissor jack with rubber slotted contact point as a back up to the lifting jack as it's a cheap 2 ton jack..."

Holy ****, man...seriously? I don't care who made it, a scissors jack is a disaster waiting to happen...
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,219 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,219 Posts
Holy ****, man...seriously? I don't care who made it, a scissors jack is a disaster waiting to happen...
In what way? All the GM scissors jacks are mechanically inferior to the job? Or are you referring to misuse (unstable ground, lack of tire chocks, etc.)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
All of the above. They are not structurally sound enough for repeated use, and fail rate is...doesn't matter what the percentage is, if your's is the one that fails.
Every car forum I've been on frowns on the scissor jack for anything other than emergency use. Many discard it at vehicle purchase and replace it with a quality bottle jack (which, of course STILL shouldn't be used as a stand!)
YMMV!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,219 Posts
All of the above. They are not structurally sound enough for repeated use, and fail rate is...doesn't matter what the percentage is, if your's is the one that fails.
Based on this and that nothing is failure free, the only recourse is to have the dealer lift the car, shifting a lift failure to them.

Every car forum I've been on frowns on the scissor jack for anything other than emergency use. Many discard it at vehicle purchase and replace it with a quality bottle jack (which, of course STILL shouldn't be used as a stand!)
YMMV!
"Every", "frowns", "many"? No actual failure rates? Have you found a bottle jack that fits under the Volt's lift/jack points?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
I do hate it when someone changes the title of a thread after there are several replies - Those replies reflected the original thread title, so if someone was to change it, an annotation that it has been changed (and why) should be reguired

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
http://knowhow.napaonline.com/car-jack-safety-floor-jack-vs-scissor-jack/


and the op is using it as a JACK STAND! It's just not a good idea_
No, I wasn't using it as a jack stand (I have plenty of those including a combo hydralic jack/jack stand type that gives me 21"). It was merely as a back up to the rolling hydraulic jack (not bottle jack) which was holding up the car. The wheel was off the car for a week (took a lot of soaking/wire brushing to get the black corrosion behind the spoke to get it ready for painting the backside of the wheel) and the hydraulic jack held up the car for that time as it turned out. The scissor jack was there in case it didn't to take/help take the weight of the car if it didn't (it's on concrete). Two notes: I had to drive up on 2x6 to get the hydraulic jack under the Mickey Mouse ears (I also have to do that on the TR7 it's as low) and the Volt is 1500 pounds heavier than my other cars so it's at the limit of the capacity of the jack. Have to start thinking of getting a high capacity, low profile jack. I'd never get under a car not firmly on jack stands but you don't do that when taking a tire off.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,219 Posts
http://knowhow.napaonline.com/car-jack-safety-floor-jack-vs-scissor-jack/


and the op is using it as a JACK STAND! It's just not a good idea_
Sure, no quibble with that article. I would never crawl under a car unless it was held up by a suitably sized jack stand.

But again, no stats, no details, no analysis on actual failure rates of various lifting equipment. What's the mechanical failure rate for a scissors jack sized for the vehicle? Same question for a bottle jack, a rolling hydraulic lift, a jack stand, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Flogging a dead horse, fo r sure, but...it is my understanding that a rolling hydraulic jack is NEVER to be used as a stand. It's only temporary until a proper stand is in place.
I've had a hydraulic jack lose pressure prior to getting a stand under the car. Fortunately, I wasn't under the car, and in fact, the wheel/tire was still on the car. I've also had a different hydraulic jack gradually lose pressure while being used, and watched the car slowly descend.

Steverino: I'm not trying to be flippant about this, but seriously. Do you really need to see statistics re: failure rate of any scissor jack? They're engineered to a minimum standard (no, I don't know that as a fact!), they're made out of stamped steel, joints/hinges are pressed/pinched. If they're not used perfectly vertical, integrity is lost, and the car can roll.

You guys can, and will, do what you want in your garage, but I would never recommend to anyone that a scissor jack belongs in any garage. They are for temporary emergency use only, and even then, with suitable precautions.
YMMV!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,219 Posts
Flogging a dead horse, fo r sure, but...it is my understanding that a rolling hydraulic jack is NEVER to be used as a stand. It's only temporary until a proper stand is in place.
I don't recommend that either.

Steverino: I'm not trying to be flippant about this, but seriously. Do you really need to see statistics re: failure rate of any scissor jack?
You implied a significant failure rate without any stats other than other people's opinions. I'm just asking for facts, I'm genuinely curious. I can't find any. I think it matters whether the failure rate is 1 in a billion uses vs. 1 in 2000 uses, or 1 in 10 uses. I'm focused on the equipment, not operator error.

Everything has a risk. Don't leave the house, it's dangerous out there. Of course, don't stay in the house either, it's dangerous in there too. Without data, it's a bit hard to judge which is more dangerous and what the danger source is or if it will even apply to me based on my circumstances.

I'll go out on a limb and say you are more likely to die just driving your car daily than you are by changing a tire with a scissor's jack. Does that mean I'd crawl under the car held up only with a scissors jack, or a hydraulic lift of some sort? No. I'd want jack stands.

I submit that most accidents will be caused by the operator rather than the equipment. The failure of an undersized tool is the operator's fault for example. Even the heavy duty lifts used at dealerships can fail due to worn parts, bad maintenance.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top